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Full text of "Walton Advertiser"






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WALT 




OR '" 

KLQNGING TC 

*£*&£**». Art*. 9.M4 




— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY — BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 




Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 1950 



Volume 35 - Number 1 



1949 Is Record Road 
Year For Kentucky 



The year 1949 was a record break- 
big road year for Kentucky and 
brought the state national recog- 
nition for an expansive highway 
program, Highway Commissioner J. 
A. Keck said today. 

During the year just passed Ken- 
tucky placed 2,926 miles of highway 
and bridges under contract at a to- 
tal cost of $38,233,802. A Bureau of 
Public Roads report In October rank- 
ed the state second in the nation in 
the number of miles of road under 
contract and sixth in the dollar val- 
ue of contracts awarded. 

"This is an all-time high for road 
money spent in one year in Kentuc- 
ky and is more than twice the value 
of contracts let duping 1948," Com- 
missioner Keck said. Roadwork for 
1948 totaled $16,500,000 and for 1947, 
$23,000,000. 

"Although 1949 was a record year 
for the Department of Highways we 
are out to break that record in 1950," 
Commissioner Keck stated. 'Pass- 
age of the salary amendment to the 
Kentucky Constitution will make 
possible the employment of Che nec- 
essary technical help and increased 
use of Kentucky 'highways will mean 
more revenue. Kentucky's progress 
depends upon more and better high- 
ways. Our program calls for many 
major Improvements," the Commis- 
sioner said. 

Christmas Home Coming 

On December 26th, the children, 
grandchildren and great-grandchil- 
dren of C. E. Baker gathered at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond H. 
Baker, Verona, Route 1. A bounti- 
ful dinner was served at noon, and 
afterwards everyone exchanged 
gifts. Those present were: 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Baker, Boian 
and Betty Mae Johns of Warsaw; 
Mr. and Mrs. O. O. Baker and Chas. 
McCrander, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. George 
E. Baker, Rita and Ronnie, of Rising 
Sun, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. Landy Young 
and Bob, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. 
Young and Douglas, Mr. and Mrs. 
James W. Young and Johnnie, of 
Warsaw; Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. 
Baker, Jr., Bonnie and Ralphie, Floyd 
C. Baker and Miss Thelma Rider, of 
Wallton; Mr. and Mrs. W. T. McClure, 
Edgar B., Mary Lois and Allen Con- 
dit, of Elsmere; Mr. and Mrs. How- 
ell Vincent, Sue, Galvernia, Halena, 
Sydney, Peggy and Charlene Vin- 
cent, of Covington; Mr. and Mrs. 



SLEET-BROWN 

On Sunday morning, December 25 
following worship services at the 
Hughes Chapel Methodist Church, 
Beaver Lick, Miss Rebecca Sleet of 
Walton, and Mr. William Brown of 
Beaver, were united in marriage by 
the pastor, Rev. V. V. Bill, before a 
large audience in the beautifully 
decorated church. 

OVIrs. Brown is a teacher in the 
Covington Public School system, and 
Mr. Brown is a painter. They are 
residing with the bride's father, C. 
C. Sleet, of South Main Street. 

Their many friends extend con- 
gratulations. 

Homemakers to Meet 

The Walton Homemakers Club 
will meet with Mrs. Ralph Carpen- 
ter with Mrs. Daisy Jack as co- 
hostess on Friday January 13th. The 
lesson will be 'Millinery." 



Missionary Meeting Today 

The Woman's Missionary Society 
of the Walton Christian Church is 
meeting at the church today (Jan. 
5th). Mrs. George Fisher and Mrs. 
Carl Simpson are hostesses. 



JOHN H. VEST 

John H. Vest, age 75, passed away 
at his home on Verona Road, Wal- 
ton, Saturday, December 31st after 
a long illness. 

Besides his, wife, Mrs. Emma Tun- 
gate Vest, hie is survived by five dau 
ghters, Mrs. Carl H. Watkins of Cdn 
cinnati, Mrs. Bruce Price of Lock 
land, Ohio, Mrs. Albert Thomas of 
Owenton, Ky., Mrs. Howard Penn- 
ington of Glenda'le, Ohio, and Mrs. 
Andrew Jaraian of Walton, and two 
sons, Austin H. Vest of Cincinnati, 
and William Vest of Walton, Route 
2. 

Funeral services were held in the 
Walton Baptist Church at 2:00 p. m., 
Tuesday, January 3, 1950, with bur- 
ial at Owenton, Ky. 

Arrangements were completed by 
the Chambers & Grubtos funeral 
home, Walton. 



Wildcats Trip Bearcats 30-19 
Tuesday Night In Newport Gym 



Substitute Clerk- 
Carrier Position 
Is Open Here 



Hopewell Circle to Meet 

The*Gladys Hopewell Circle will 
meet at the Walton Baptist Church 
on Thursday, January 12th at 7:30 
p. m., with Mrs. Dora Pennington as 
hostess. All members are urged to 
be present for this first meeting of 
the new year. 



Lesson On Millinery 
Given Boone County 
Homemaker Leaders 



Miss Dorothy Threlkeld, Clothing 
Specialist from the University of 
Kentucky, gave the lesson on Mil- 
linery to Boone County Homemak- 
ers} (recently. Fifteen clubs sent 
leaders for the closs. Those present 
were Mrs. Lee Marshall, Mrs. T. 
Hensley, Mrs. Lou Pope, Mrs. J. Rice, 
Mrs. J. Northcutt, Mrs. R. Kottmeyer, 
Mrs. V. Goodrddge, Mrs. Ed Utzinger, 
Mrs. R. Seibree, Mrs. J. Dye, Mrs. Geo. 
Cassidy, Mrs. R. Duvall, Mrs. F. 

Willis L. Marksberry of Verona; Mr. £*££' Jgj £ g£TS& ^ I' 
and Mrs. Earl Scudder, Betty and ET'-SS^ff*^ 



Joe, of Warsaw; C. E. Baker, St., Miss 
Juanita Baker, Master Raymond H. 
Baker, Jr., and the host and hostess, 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond H. Baker. 



LEGION! 

POST 



The third in a series of square 
dances will be held at the Walton 
Legion Home, Friday evening, Jan- 
uary 13, 1950. Public invited. Fred- 
die Fields and the Foolish Fellers 
will again ibe n hand to supply the 
music for the evening. — Pub. Chm 



The regular business meeting of 
Johnson -McElroy Post, 277, Ameri- 
can Legion will be held Monday 
evening, January 9th at 8:00 -p. m. 
in the Legion Home. Members are 
urged to be present. Business meet- 
ings of the Post are now held on the 
second and fourth Monday of each 
month.— Adj. _^ lm ^^... 

Gunpowder Homemakers 

The January meeting of the Gun- 
powder Homemakers will be held 
on Tuesday, January 10, 1950 dn the 
home of Mrs. Bert Marksberry at 
10:30 a. m. , 

The project will be "Clothing and 
Millinery," with Mrs. Dolpha Sebree 
and Mrs. Edgar Utzinger as leaders. 
Visitors always welcome. — Pub. Chr. 

Return from Florida 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Justice of the 
Braoht-Piner Road and Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer Lawrence of Williamstown, 
have returned home m from Orlando, 
Fla., after having spent the Christ- 
mas holidays with their "children, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Justice and 
family. While in Florida they tour- 
ed both the east and west coasts. 



Morehead, Mrs. W. B. McCormick, 
Mrs. Stanley Fooks, Mrs. Bonnie 
Woods, Mrs. Matthew Flynn, Mrs. 
R. J. Myers and Miss Donna Mae 
Ten-ill. 

The next training class will be 
held January 11th in the Florence 
Town Ball. After that, folks, watch 
for those new Spring Bonnets! 



Pleasant Grove W. S. C. S. 

Mrs. H. A. Sutter was hostess to 
the Pleasant Grove Woman's Society 
W Christian Service for it's annual 
Christmas' party, December 15. Her 
spaeio^-homeSwas decorated beau- 
tifully in traditional motif. After a 
short business' meeting, conducted 
by Mrs. F. B. Hermes, members and 
guests assembled in the dining room 
for lunch, where a huge Santa 
greeted them. 

In the afternoon the program was 
in charge of Mrs. Ralph Lewellen. 
The scripture reading of the birth 
of Christ was given by Mrs. C. W. 
Pruett. The program also included 
Mrs. W. B. LeMaster, Mrs. Ira Jack- 
son and Mrs. J. A. Rich. Members 
are sending a Christmas (basket to 
a needy family. The closing prayer 
was offered by Mrs. John Wheary. 

Recordings of Christmas carols 
were play, with members forming a 
chorus. Games and the appearance 
of St. Nick, who distributed gifts to 
all; was enjoyed. 

Mrs. Sutter was assisted by her 
daughter, Mrs. Norman McConkey 
in dispensing hospitalities to the 
following: Mesdames Clarence Arm- 
strong, William Grant, F. B. Hermes, 
A. L. Hicks, foa Jackson, W. B. Le- 
Master, Ralph Lewellen, George Pet- 
singer, Ralph Porter, Walter Raabe, 
J. A. Rich, C. W. Pruett, John Wheary, 
A. Sbuster, J. HiUard, and guests- 
Mrs. U. R. Turner, Miss Marcella 
Armstrong and Masters Gene Jack- 
son and Norman McConkey. 

In January, the society will meet 
at the 'home of Mrs. F. B. Hermes. 



The U. S. Civil Service Commission 
today announced an examination 
for Substitute Clerk-Carrier for duty 
in the Walton (Ky.) Post Office. 

The basic rate of pay for Substitute 
Clerk-Carrier is $1,315 an hour. After 
.the performance of one year of sat- 
isfactory service, including time 
served as a Special Delivery Messen- 
ger, the basic rate of pay is increas- 
ed 10 cents an hour for the second 
year of satisfactory substitute ser- 
vice, and 5 cents an hour each suc- 
ceeding yeaT thereafter until a max- 
imum of $1,815 an hour is reached. 
This 5 cent increase is made at the 
beginning of the quarter following 
the completion of one year of satis- 
factory service in the next lower 
grade. 

The age limits for these positions 
are 18 to 50. These age limits will 
be waived for persons entitled to 
veteran preference, and, under cer- 
tain circumstances, for war-service 
indefinite employees. No specific 
experience or education is re^ ured, 
but all applicants must pass a writ- 
ten examination designed to test 
their ability in sorting and in follow- 
ing instructions. 

Applicants for these positions must 
actually reside within the delivery 
zone of the Walton (Ky.) Post Office 
or be bona fide patrons of that of- 
fice. 

Applications for this examination 
must toe filed with the Sixth Region- 
al Office, U. S. CM1 Service Commis- 
sion, U. S. Post Office and Court- 
house, Cincinnati 2, Ohio, not later 
ithan January 16, 1950. Further in- 
formation and application forms 
may toe obtained from the Commis- 
sion's Local Secretary located at 
Walton, Ky., or from «he information 
office of the Sixth Region, located 
on the ninth floor of the Federal 
Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Local Couple Injured 
Sunday In Automobile 
Mishap In Tennessee 



Mr.' and Mrs. Jess Thornton, of 
Walton, were involved in an auto- 
mobile accident about 2 p. m. Sun- 
day, January 1st. 

The couple were alone, and head- 
ed for Knoxville, Tennessee, where 
he is employed as Government em- 
ployee on the tobacco markets there. 
The accident occurred near Onida, 
Tennessee,, with Mr. Thornton driv- 
ing and seeming to lose control due 
to the slippery condition of the road 
and rammed a bank, throwing both 
clear of the car, where they laid in 
an unconscious condition for some 
time until a passerby pick them and 
took them to the hospital. 

Mrs. Thornton is suffering from 
broken nibs, cuts, bruises and shook, 
while Mr. Thornton has face and 
head cuts, back injury, but is re- 
sponding nicely. . 

Mr. and Mrs. James Vest and Mr. 
and Mrs. Jess William Thornton has 
gone to Knoxville where they are 
in the hospital. 



INCOME TAX MAN 
HERE JAN. 11 &27 

Collector of Internal Revenue, S. 
R. Glenn, announces that a deputy 
from his office will visit Walton on 
January 11, and 27, and Burlington, 
January 12 and 30, 1950 for .the pur- 
pose of assisting farmers in pre- 
paring their January 31st declara- 
tion or final income tax returns, al- 
so taxpayers whose income under 
the law is not classified as income 
from farming and was not subject 
to withholdingr and taxpayers who 
would be required to file amended 
declaration returns or Would be priv- 
ileged to file final returns by Jan- 
uary 16. 

The service is absolutely free, and 
Collector Glenn urges the taxpayers 
of this county to see the deputy and 
let him help them with their income 
tax problems. 

Gunpowder Homemakers 

The December meeting of the Gun-' 
powder Homemakers in the form of 
a Christmas party was held at the 
home of Mrs. B. M. Stevens Decem- 
ber 13th. 

A program of songs and stories 
was carried out by the capable pro- 
gram chairman Mrs. Web Shelton. 
Suggestions for Christmas decora- 
tions were given by Mrs. Edgar 
Utizinger. 

Dinner was followed toy games and ; 
an exchange of gifts. Answering 
roll call with "the most treasured 
present received as a child were 
Mesdames Ray Newman, Paul Aylor, 
George Black, Clephas R add iff, 
Cj'lenii Stevens, Cliff Norman, Bert 
Marksberry, Edgar Utizinger, Robert 
Moore, Dolepha Sebree, William 
Oliver, Virgil Kelley, Web Shelton, 
Miss Elva Hughes,. Visitors Mes- 
dames Preston Hedges, William 
Ferguson and Harold Merke. 



PENNINGTON-BERKSHIRE 



On Saturday evening, the last 
hour of the old year, an impressive 
ceremony was solemnized in the 
Walton Christian Church parsonage. 
Using a dauble ring ceremony, Rev. 
Fred S. Nichols united in the holy 



Next Game At 
Hazard, Jan. 13 



The Newport Wildcats handed the 
Walton-Verona Bearcats their first 
set-back of the basketball season 
bono^ of marriage Miss Mary Louise Tuesda j ht , n N e Wport , defeat- 
Pennington and Galen Robbinsl lng , the locals 30 . 19 in ^ hat seems 

Ksnire. Ito have been a very slow and cau- 

These young people, among thejtious contest.' The winners led 

finest of our community, are de- throughout the game, but it was 

servedly popular and they will have quite close until late in the final 

the best wishes of their unusually [ quarter, when the home team pull- 



large circle of friends. 



Special Events For 
Homemakers at Farm 
And Home Convention 



ed away. Period scores were: First, 
7-6; second, 15-11; third, 20-15, and 
fourth, 30-19. 

This was the Bearcats' first loss 
and gives them a record for the year 
of 9 wins and 1 loss. 

In the preliminary game, the New- 
port reserves routed the local second 
team 35-15. 

Walton-Verona FG 

Meadows, f 1 

Rice, f l 



Local Mason Named 
As District Deputy 
Grand Master 



W- O. Rouse, a life-long resident 
of Walton, was elected Secretary of 
the Walton Lodge, F. and A. M., No. 
719, for the nineteenth consecutive 
time at the Masonic election held 
here December 27, 1949. 

Mr. Rouse was raised to the sub- 
lime degree of a Master Mason in 
the Walton Lodge on October 3, 1919 
and was awarded his 25-year pin by 
the Grand Lodge of Kentucky in '44. 



February 3 has been designated T 
as Homemakers Day at the Farm ;?„ n j°"' „ - ? 

and Home Convention in Lexington, 
scheduled to begin January 31. 

High spot of the day will be the 
Homemakers International Lunch- 
eon, when Mrs. Raymond Sayre of 
Iowa, international president of the 
Associated Country Women of the 
World, wHl speak. 

Two women will be recognized as 
Master Farm Homemakers at the 
morning program. 

Decision of judges on a creed for 
Kentucky homemakers will be an- 
nounced and the author recognized. 
The winner of a story on tihe sub- 
ject, 'IMy Day," also wiia be Intro- 
duced. 

Homemakers who attended the 
National Home Demonstration Co- 
uncil in Colorado Springs will bring 
highlights of that meeting. Mrs. W. 
K. Morris, state president of the Ken- 
tucky Federation of Homemakers, 
will preside. 

Miss Alice Word, Hopkinsv*lle, 
International Youth Exchange dele- 
gate, who spent four months in Den- 
mark last summer through the co- 
operation of homemakers clubs 
throughout the state, will use col- 
ored slides in telling pi her trip. 

Gavels will be presented to home- 
makers associations iiCarter, Mar- 
shall, Monroe and MoBneary coun- 
ties for having met the requirements 
of the Kentucky Federation of Home- 
makers. The association in Powell 
county will ibe awarded a president's 
pin and gavel for having secured a 
home demonstration agent. 



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Watch Party Saturday 

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Carlisle enter- 
tained with a New Year's watch par- 
ty, the following guests: Mr. and 
Mrs. Ward Rice and Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Stephenson. Lunch was 
served ait midnight. 




W. O. Rouse 



Mr. Rouse has been most faithful 
in his services, having served as 
Master of the local lodge in 1924, 
and as Patron of the Eastern Star in 
1928. He became a member of the 
Scottish Rite of Covington in 1920. 
Walton Lodge elected Brother Rouse 
an honorary life member on Decem- 
ber 22, 1949. 

For services well rendered In the 
interest of Free Masonry, Brother 
Nat S. King, Jr., Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Kentucky, conferred 
upon Bro. Rouse the honor of select- 
ing him to represent the Grand 
Lodge In this section as District 
Deputy Grand Master lor the ensu- 
ing year. Brother Rouse labors ard- 
ently dn the interest of his lodge and 
is worthy of all the honors bestowed 
upon him. — A Member of Walton 
Lodge, No. 719. 



Ryland Homemakers 

Mrs. iF. B. Hermes was hostess to 
the Ryland Homemakers Club for 
the annual Christmas party, Tues- 
day, at her lovely home in Ryland 
Heights. 

Christmas carols were sung by the 
group, accompanied by Mrs. J. S. 
Murchlson at the portable organ. 
Christmas gifts were exchanged. 

Mrs. J. A. Rich read a poem, "I 
Sing The Birth," by Ben Johnson. 
Mrs. R. L. Gibson read a story, "Gift 
From Nazareth." Mrs. Oliver Gee 
read a poem, 'Just Pretending," and 
Mrs. O. J. Williams read an enter- 
taining story, 'Duke's Christmas." 
Mrs. William Dickman had charge 
of the games, and Mrs. J. S. Murcha- 
son closed the program with a read- 
ing, "Billy Peebles' Christmas." A 
basket was filled for a needy fam- 
ily. 

The following were present: Mes- 
dames Alice Frakes, Oliver Gee, Wm. 
Bagby, W. A. Damon, Shelby Martin, 
J. A. Rich, N. L Leach, R. L. Gibson, 
O. J. Williams, J. S. Murchison, R. 
C. Fornash, H. R Rubbe, James 
•.Frakes and iguests, Mrs. Roland 
Hermes, Mrs. Wendell Jackson, Miss 
Jane Jackson, and the hostess. fy 

Real Estate Transfers 

Harry F. Johnson reports the fol- 
lowing real estate transfers, com- 
pleted by him: 

The heirs of the late Frank Bridges 
and wife, farm of 85 acres near Fisk- 
burg, sold to Fred Jones and wife. 

George Flynn sold to Cecil Cum- 
mins and Wife a 103-acre farm on 
Bagby Road, Kenton county. 

Because of her Interest in learning 
to sew In her homemakers clulb, the 
family of Mrs. Marguerite Seelhorst 
of Greenup county presented her 
with an electric sewing machine. 



Maddox, c 1 

j Cheeseman, g 1 

[Vest, g 3 

Cleek, g 2 

Totals „ 9 

Newport FG 

Sheanshang, f ___ 6 

Moeves, f 3 

Knapp, c 1 

Redmond, g 

Derrick, g 2 

Totals 12 

Cheeseman Injured 

During the Wildcat-Bearcat game 
Layne Cheeseman, Walton guard, 
fell and sprained his elbow. He <vsl3 
treated at St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
and released. 
Hazard and Leslie County Next 

Next weekend the Bearcats take a 
trip down in Kentucky, playing 
Homer Lee Osborn's Hazard five on 
Friday night, Jan. .13, and the Leslie 
County team, Saturday night fol- 
lowing. 



TROUTMAN-RYAN 

, On Thursday, December 29th at 
3:00 p. m. in Covington, Miss Jean- 
etta Troutman of Williamstown, and 
Mr. Richard Ryan of Walton, were 
united in marriage. They were ac- 
companied toy Mr and Mrs. Ralph 
Taylor of Williamstown, and follow- 
ing the ceremony the bride and 
groom motored to Louisville for a 
^hort honeymoon. 

Mrs, Ryan is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Daniel Troutman of Cal- 
houn, Ky., and has been employed 
by the Production Credit Corporation 
in Williamstown. Mr. Ryan is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Ryan 
of Walton Star Route, and is associ- 
ated with a brother, Geo. W.Ryan, 
in operating Shamrock Inn, Bracht 
Station. 

The Ryans expect to reside in 
Walton. Their many friends ex- 
tend congratulations. 

Wedding Reception 

A wedding reception and dinner 
was given December 24th at 7:00 p. 
m., in the home of the bride's mo- 
ther, Mrs. Ann Dudgeon, in honor of 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stephenson. 

Guests were Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Sparks, Charlie Sparks, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ray Sparks and family, Mrs. Arthur 
Burdine, Mrs. Edith Black and Mary 
K., Jimmie Brewer, Mrs. Emma 
Flynn, Mr. and Mrs. Lebus Stephen- 
son and Sherry M., Mr. and Mrs. 
Owen Stephenson and Marilyn, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Stephenson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Marion Stephenson and L. B. 
Stephenson. Everyone left at a late 
hour having had a nice time and 
wishing the bride and groom much 
happiness and success. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson were 
married in the Baptist parsonage by 
Rev. B. C. Garrett 



DRIVER DIES IN CAR 

James R Bristow, 36, Union, was 
found dead in hds car on Philadel- 
phia street, Covington^ Tuesday, by 
Charles Westerman. Mrs. Tressa 
Riffe, Kenton County Coroner, re- 
ported a verdict of death due to a 
heart attack. 

Grover Eads, commercial vege- 
table grower in Wayne county, 
treated approximately 1,500 square 
feet of plantbed with methyl bro- 
mide for weed control. 



•■■•-■■■ ■■ ' ' ■■ ; ' ■■•-■ -■ 



, .^l^'i'^/i!"'''^^!^^^!'-- v/'i 7^- i , 



Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 5, 1950. 



WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 



Entered as Second Class Matter 

January 1, 1916 at the Poet 

Office at Walton, Ky. 



Mark M. Meadows 

Editoi and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

S1.50 PER TEAR 
(In Advance) 




KENTVCKIAI^ 
,nWASHIN6W* 





MEMBER 



:enTucky presi 
'association, 

-o.ciiJUifA ntnrtwM 



— Is Touz Subscription Paid — 



DR. PAIL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



Trey're all back— the Senators and 
Congressmen from Kentucky and 
elsewhere. The halls and corridors 
of the Capitol looked like a hotel 
lobby in a college town on the night 
of the big game. And, of course, the 
big topic of conversation was .the 
game of politics. With all of the 
House and a third of the Senate up 
for election, lawmakers were fear- 
fully talking about campaign tides 
and trends. 
Last Time: 

This coming election (November) 
will be the la^t one under the pres- 
ent District setup. It seems to be a 
foregone conclusion that the state 
will lose a seat in Congress. Ken- 
tucky has failed to keep up with the 
average growth of the nation. 

There was a time when the Blue 
Grass state ranked way up there 
when it came to numerical strength 
in Congress. Back there on 1830, 
Kentucky had 13 Congressmen. On- 
ly New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia 
and Ohio had more. Since then, the 
trend has been down. Today, we 
have nine. In 1952 that figure may 
be reduced to eight— or even seven. 
A Big Part: 

Kentucky, in spite of its numerical 
decline, still plays a big part in leg- 
islative affairs. 

For example, Senator Withers is 
on the Senate Labor Committee and 
that committee will handle propos- 
als for a National Health Insurance 
program as well as Civil Rights. 
There's bound to be wireworks. 

Senator Chapman will be no less 
busy. His committee on the Armed 
Forces will consider a Draft exten- 
sion and his committee will tackle 
the job of keeping the nation — and 
the free democratic world — well 
armed. 
Committee Ross: 

To Congressman Spence will fall 
one of the toughest jobs in the Low- 
er House. As Chairman of the House 
Banking Committee, he'll handle 
rent control legislation. In addition 
he'll ibe in charge of export-import 



INDEPENDENCE I 

ii» — I— ■ — i limn mi — — — I 



controls, a mighty ticklish subject 
these days. 

Matters of tax reduction fall to the 
House Ways and Means' Committee. 
Here Congressman Gregory will get 
a chance to use his influence. 

When it comes to economy, Con- 
gressman Bates will be consulted. 
He's on the House Appropriations 
Committee. In the field of federal- 
aid-to-education, young Congress- 
man Perkins will play a part. He's 
a member of the House Committee 
on Education. 

All in all, Kentucky makes up in 
influence and prestige what it may 
lack in numbers. 
Do You Know: 

The House and Senate chambers 
look a lot better. All those unsight- 
ly steel girders that held up the roof 
are gone . . . Northern Kentucky of- 
ficials are expected to come to Wash- 
ington soon to consult on flood con- 
trol appropriations . . . Fred Vinson, 
although on the Supreme Court, still 
is in demand as a guest at parties 
. . . and Washington radio people, 
headed by NBC's Bill McAndrew, 
formerly of Covington, are prepar- 
ing to entertain President Truman 
next month. 

ADMINISTRATRIX NOTICE 

All persons having claims against 
the estate of Ells Hopperton, deceas- 
ed, are requested to present same, 
properly proven according to law, 
and all persons indebted to said 
estate are requested to call and set- 
tle with undersigned. 

—ALBERTA HOPPERTON, 
2t-51 Administratrix. 

Approximately 75 percent of the 
farms in Russell county are growing 
Ky. 31 fescue. 

Popcorn in Calloway county yield- 
ed from 1,000 to 1,200 pounds an acre 
and sold for $2.75 a hundred lbs. 

Dan Doby of Knox county cut his 
alfalfa four times, with a total yield 
of eight tons. 



Little David Cain, son of Thomas 
Cain, had an appendix operation, 
but made it home for Christmas. 

Miss Mary Houston broke her arm 
at a skating party last week. 

W. E. Maners, pastor of the Inde- 
pendence Baptist Church, reports 
that he has regained his faith in 
Santa Claus. His people turned out 
at prayer and Bible study meeting 
in a goodly number. All was quiet 
till the close of the service when the 
pastor and wife were invited to the 
basement where refreshments were 
served and fifty to seventy-five dol- 
lars' worth of presents were pre- 
sented to the pastor and wife, with 
best wishes for a Merry Christmas 
and a Happy New Year. 

Richard MoKdnley underwent a 
minor operation last Friday at St. 
Elizabeth Hospital. 

Mrs, Dan Hoffman has been suf- 
fering with a heart ailment. 

New Year's parties were given in 
the homes of Miss Velma Louder- 
irrilk and Miss P*uline Williams. 

In the church circles, the folk are 
still talking about how well the 
Baptist young people did in their 
Christmas play. The house was 
filled. 



W. R. Sparks of Laurel county 
built a 40x70 ft. tobacco barn, using 
plans from the College of Agricul- 
ture and Home Economics, U. of Ky. 

Frank Oickie of Bell county order- 
ed 12,000 locust seedlings for setting 
out on his farm in the spring. 



Four (thousand acres were sowed 
to cover crops in Whitney county, the 
largest acreage In several years. 

Farmers in Trimble county who 
fired their hurley, came through 
with bright tobacco, despite frequent 
warm rains. 



GOOD F'00DS,-th#RVSHT KIND, 

AND"$UNSH'IN*E u .GAli-ORE •• 

SUCH VITAMlN'.'SouaCE^f,;' 

»HAVE PLENT^I N iTQRg. . 



«MB 



,'»(' 



*•■' 





&-*-«-*/ NOT EVEN AN ESKIMO 
WOULD TRADE PLACES WITH HIM I 



CM 



COLD? You bet it's cold on an icy pole in the teeth of 
a biting wind! But weather can't stop C P/ S. Co. 
trouble shooters when emergency repairs are needed 
to maintain your electric service. 

Winter or summer, day or night, when storms unavoid- 
ably disrupt electric service, you can be sure that 
C P. S. Co. linemen are on the job, doing their best 
to repair the damage in the shortest possible time. 
They don't expect any praise or thanks for this. They're 
simply doing the Job for which they've been trained. 

So, if your lights should flicker or go out during a 
storm, think of the men on the ley poles or exposed to ^ 
the wind and tain. Regardless of personal discomfort, 
they'll be working hard to restore your service as 
quickly as It humanly possible. 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

Ijoun. QrtendUf, ClecUio Company 



' ■ ' But 3u^r ^o :^kp^ur e 

■j ', llOUR ^U^PUY-^ .'O.KAY. 
' U 'E AfcL^W'&'OFH'E :'MJ LTI P L E ' 
-•A- DAY".. 



There in vitamin protection 
for you, neighbor! When 
you supplement the food you 
eat each day with One-A- 
Day (brand) Multiple Vita- 
min Capsules, you get all 
the vitamins known to be 
necessary in human nutri- 
tion. When it is so easy and 
inexpensive to take One-A- 
Dat (brand) Multiple Vita- 
min Capsules, can you afford 
to be without them? To 
assure minimum daily re- 
quirements, take just one 
capsule each day, —a,-^ __ 

druogUtl, 



ONE W DAY 



MULTIPLE VITAMIN CAPSULES 



For the Best In Heating 
J arman Heating Service 

WALTON ... 524 or 921 

Engineered Heating — Coal, OIL 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



DIAMOND 
iVALUE . . . 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and 
admiration. 

Come to Motch's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced i n strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
ence In this one loca- 
tion Is your assurance 
of getting dollar for 
dollar value. In tout 
purchase. 

/ Weekly or 
Monthly Payments! 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON. KENTUCKY 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 



After - Inventory 

CLEARANCE 

Entire Stock 

Of Seasonable Merchandise 

Greatly Reduced ! 



1 Table Slightly Soiled and Mussed 1 
Merchandise at '. — ™ Price 



-AS ALWAYS 



GUARANTEED QUALITY 



You get more quality tor your money when 
you buy "STAR BRAND." "POLL PARHOTT" 
and "ENDICOTT JOHNSON" shoes. We sell 
better shoes at lower prices. Compare the 
quality and price of our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. P. F. Gym Shoes. 

—WE FIT BY X-RAY— 




Morris Dept . Store 

"The House of Quality" — Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER -t- KENTUCKY 



Maytag! $29,95 

For Your Old Washer; No Down Payment; 1 Yr. to Pay 

Ofcourseyoucan 
afford a /ftai/Jaq/ 




capacity- 



'.Te7b»iVt. 



Now — a genuine Maytag at these easy-on-the-budget prices! 
Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
faction with the rugged, dependable Maytag! 

Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
onstration. 





THE MAYTAG CHIEFTAIN. A gen- 
uine Maytag, yet priced within a 

few dollars of the lowest- ^mn mac 
eost waehers on the *|2*t" 
market. ■»-»— „. 



THE MAYTAO COMMANDER 
Big, square porcelain tub. Gyra- 
foam action waihaa „ - ___ 
extra fast, extra *\AQ"> 

dean. " '""" 



HAGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 



I 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



-** 




Thursday, January 5, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 




WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 
Bryan Rector, Supt. "' 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Fred S. Nichols, Pastor 
Claude Adams, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

• Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth ' Fellowship 6:45 p. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 

ST. PATRICK CHURCH. VERONA 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
5th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

ALL SAINTS MISSION. WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m: 

5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

iRev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 
—Services Every Sunday — 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 
J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service _•_ 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. __-_ 7:30 p. m. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m, 

(First and Third Sundays) 



Page Three 





■T lntan«H™_ ItoUcrm Vll 
Sund., SchoolU-on, fTI 

ill WSiMAH 1 



SCRIPTirRE: Acti 2:1-41. 
DEVOTIONAL READING! Joel 2:20- 



The Church Dynamic 

Lesson for January 8, 1950 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 
J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a 

Christian 'Endeavor 6:30 p 

Evening Worship 7:30 p 



m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 



SOUTH FOBK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Don Smith, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 




INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 

Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m, 

Bible Study Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen. Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 1 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 



CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Walter Kldwell, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 



CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor — Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt.— Harvey Hughes 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 
Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m. 



LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 



BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Moming Services 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services ■ 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR , 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington. Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Rav 



— 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

-COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



♦ 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 





again 

investors of 

lump sums are receiving their 

semi-annual cash income, as always. 

FIRST FEDERAL ESfS_? 

501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINGTON, KY. 



•PHE CHURCH is not meant to be 
* a club, a lecture-hall, a debat- 
ing society, a rest home, a music 
hall, an entertainment bureau or a 
burial association. It has some- 
thing to do along all these lines, 
of course. But the Church is meant to 
be a place and 
channel of power, i 
One of the last 
things Jesus, the 
Founder of the 
Church, said to his 
friends was: "Ye 
shall receive pow- 
er when the Holy 
Spirit is come up- 
on you." Not— you 
shall receive com- Dr - Foreman 
fort, or wealth, or Insight, or any 
other good thing, though all of 
them have thqlr place. What 
Jesus highlights is power. 

Dr. W. M. Horton, in his little 
book on the Christian faith, asks: 
When Is a church not a church? 
His answer Is: When it has lost 
the Holy Spirit That is a good 
New Testament answer. 

The early Christmas could not 
have imagined a church with- 
out the Holy Spirit, because 
in fact there had never been 
one without him. It was the 
coming of the Spirit on that 
summer day in Jerusalem that 
actually made the church, in 
the first place. True, it was not 
made out of nothing. 

But suppose the Spirit had never 
come? What would have happened? 
Sooner or later the little band would 
have grown tired of waiting, would 
have given up faith in Jesus' prom- 
ise, would have drifted off one by 
one, and the Christian church would 
have died before it was born. 

Tongues of Fire 

•THERE SEEMS to be something 
* mystic, mysterious and unreal 
about the Holy Spirit, to most peo- 
ple's minds. We read in Acts about 
the flaming tongues of fire, about 
the rushing mighty wind, about 
Christians talking in strange lan- 
guages; and then we go to our own 
church and find there no fire, no 
wind; only ordinary English is 
spoken by everyday people, the 
same people we have been seeing 
all week. 

We get to thinking the Holy Spirit 
is just something in the Bible, some 
experience they could have away 
back yonder, but not here and now. 
After all, looking over the church 
from that day to this, and around 
the world at the present day, how 
many cases, authentic genuine cases 
of fire-on-the-head or storm-in-the- 
church-house, do you' find? Not 
many! Does that show the Holy 
Spirit Is not here any more? ■ 

We must remember that SI 
Paul met with much the same 
questions. Did a man have to 
speak in strange tongues to be 
sure he had the Holy Spirit? 
Fortunately, Paul stated in so 
many words what the fruits of 
the Spirit are: Love, joy, peace 
... Look up the rest of it in Gal. 
3:22-23. 

You may take St. Paul's in- 
spired word for it: If you over see a 
church, a Christian group, that is 
notable for love, joy, peace-. . . 
gentleness, goodness, faith . . . you 
may be sure the Holy Spirit is there. 
Wo do not gather grapes from thorns 
nor figs from thistles, Jesus says. 

You don't have the fruits of* the 
Spirit without having the Spirit. And 
that is Power. Said a great Austral- 
Ian preacher: Show me a church 
where the members treat one an- 
other with more real love than the 
people outside the church treat one 
another, and you will find men 
crowding the doors of that church to 
get In. ) 

» • • 

How Can We Get 
the Holy Spirit? 

WE CANNOT GET the Spirit by 
wishing ourselves back in the 
first century. We can have the Holy 
Spirit now, on the same terms as 
always. There are no new condi- 
tions, no complicated rules, no ap- 
plication blanks to fill out. Jesus 
said: God will give the Holy Spiril 
to them that ask him; Paul said: 
Covet earnestly the best gifts. 

In any church, if there it 
even a small group who want 
the power of God in their lives, 
who want his power for the 
church, that little group can 
change that church and change 
the community. Power passes 
through a wire when one end > 
of it is attached to a dynamo 
and the other end to a ma- 
chine that is doing some work. 

Prayer— that is the touch with 
God. Service— that is the link with 



NEW BETHEL BAPTIST, VERONA 

Rev. R. F. DeMoisey, Pastor 
Dewey Ferguson, Supt 

Sunday School _1 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 

— Services Every Sunday — 

WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Grover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMlllian, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U L. 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. m. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-©i_ae Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 

STAFFORDSBUBG CHURCH 

Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m, 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 

Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 10:30 a, m. 



WALTON, KY. 
Phone — 352 

FLORENCE, KY. 
Phone— 193 

Chambers & Grubbs 

FUNERAL HOMES 



WE APPRECIATE . . . 

When a family calls us in 
time of need, we feel deeply 
honored, for we believe that 
no public servant, and prop- 
erly so,- is selected with as 
much care as *he funeral 
director. We appreciate the 
confidence so often placed 
in us. 



THE BEST PLACE 
to" 



EAT ! 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 




For A Rainy Day! 

Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as little as $1.00! 

Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KT. 




DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday. 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 





$$l* 



fin* &* 






tstea /*c 



Among the many kinds of trees in exist- 
ence, very few retain their foliage during the 
cold winter months. Only a few withstand 
the driving winds and storms and still main- 
tain beautiful green branches. ' 

The graceful scene below shows a remark- 
able characteristic in the pine tree. Some 
miraculous element within the pine enables 
it to display its lush greenery amid the 
whiteness of fallen snow. 

Such are the amazing qualities of nature— 
the millions of wonders in God's creation. 

In order to understand more fully the God- 
given powers within ourselves, we must 
study the Holy Word and attend regularly 
the services of the Church. By doing this we 
will come to realize our potentialities and 
talents and will learn to live a fuller more 
useful life. 

* 

mmmmsam 



IW|p< 



.*,.- 









1HE CHUHCH FOB AIX 

AU FOR THE CHOBCT 

"cone why rv.^°pjfl r ">"»<* 
o' bi» co__aunL'i'/ or *• «*«► 
BiW, d__f^ r J** *•** four 

" WM*! . I_»_w— _. IMI ■ 



Linton's Barber Shop 

Walton, Kentucky 

Florence Deposit Bank 
Florence, Kentucky 

Walton Lumber Co. . 

Phone Walton 19 . 

Hamilton and Jones 
Walton. Kentucky 

Consolidated Telephone Co. 
Florence, Kentucky 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 

Phone Walton 95 



Conrad Hardware 
For Service, Large or Small. See Powers 
5 

Dixie State Bank 
Walton, Kentucky 

Meador's Grocery 
Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables. Meats 

Walton & Readnour 
Coal - Feed ■ Seed Phone Walton 154 

Roberts Grocery 
When You CM Quality and Pries 

Community Public Service Co., Inc. 

Walton. Kentucky 



KM-NI 



fX 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 5, 1950 



Personals 



Mr. and Mis. Bill Duchemin and 
two daughters and Miss June Wor- 
ley of Portsmouth, Ohio spent tihe 
Christmas holidays with Mr. and 
Mrs. Dan Roberts and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Vallamding- 
ham entertained pn Christmas day, 
the following guests: Mr. and Mrs. 
G. A. House, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Norton of Covington; Mrs. Claude 
Vice of Knoxville; Mr. and Mrs. C. D. 
Mann and Clinton Shields of Flor- 
ence; Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Jones of 
Jonesville; Miss Colleen Valland- 
ingham, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Delph and children. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Ransom of Ve- 
rona entertained with a turkey din- 
ner December 29th, for the follow- 
ing: Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ransom, 
Bucky and Jimmy Ransom of Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn., Mr. and Mrs. James 
Ransom, and Sylvia -Ransom of 
Grant, Mrs. Ursula Watts, and 
Francis Ransom of Washington, D. 
C. 

The third tobacco show in May- 
fdeld in 15 years took place in No- 
vember, being open to eight counties 
in Kentucky and three in Tennessee. 

Sixty-eight kerosene lamps were 
wired by six homemakers clubs in 
Henderson county in one month. 



—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



FOR SALE — Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. - tf-1 



HAY, STRAW, CORN— Delivered in 
quantities of one ton or more. 
Phone Ind. 6427. Russell Klein, 
Morning View, Ky. 3t-l* 



FOR SALE — Holstein heifer, been 
fresh four months, milking good 
Virgil Vallandingham, Crittenden, 
Ky. Ph. Williamstown 4490. lt-1* 




INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE — Re- 
ports prepared, thirty years ex- 
perience. W. G. Hargis, 34th and 
Graff Streets, Covington. COlonial 
7244, Independence 6488. • 2t-l» 

FOR SALE — Fresh cow and calf, 
large Jersey, heavy producer. R. 
A. Stephenson, Verona, Ky. Phone 
Walton 784.- lt-1* 



FOR SALE— 7 O. I. C. pigs, 6 weeks 
old. J. M. Cockrell, Harris Road. 
Phone Ind. 5031W. lt-1 



:-*m$P' -^vr 



| THE NEW DE LAVAL STERLING SPEEDETTE 

Especially Designed 

for the Man Who 

Milks Ten Cows 

or Less! 

The new De Laval Sterling Speed- 
ette is designed especially (or the 
man milking 10 cows or less. Your 
pocketbook can afford it— and you 
can't afford to be without it! It will 
save up to 68 full working days a 
year on a 10-cow herd, save you 
countless steps, do the milking in 
half the time and produce more and 
cleaner milk for you. See it today! 




How would you like a stack of fresh, 
orlsp, lovable, spendable MONEY— 
avaUable to you EVERT MONTH! 
Here's how you can get It— with a mem- 
bership In the simple, automatic 
"Money-of-the-Montb" Club! WHAT 
YOU DO: If you're employed by a firm, 
go to your payroll department and get 
your signature affixed to the Payroll 
Savings Flan for the purchase of United 
States Saving Bonds. Or, if you're self- 
employed, your bank can offer a simi- 
lar plan — the Bond-A-Month Plan. 
WHAT YOU GET: In just ten years, 
your bonds will mature. In ten years, 
they'll be worth four dollars for every 
three Invested! u. s. Treaiur, Devtnmtm 



ON KENTUCKY FARMS 

One hundred tulip bulbs were set 
out along the Carter county court- 
house toy the Tuesday Tomemakers 
Club and garden group. 

Forty-four farmers in Caldwell 
and adjoining counties placed 4,370 
acres of woodland under fixe pro- 
tection in 1949. 

The Slater Homemakers Club In 
Ballard county is starting a chil- 
dren's library to circulate with that 
of the homemakers. 

The average yield of corn per acre 
in the Pike county Corn Derby con- 
test was 85.5 bushels in 1949 com- 
pared to 78.9 bushels in 1948 and 
76.4 bushels in 1947. 

Wild onions in pastures in Todd 
County caused considerable loss to 
dairymen, 70 cans of off -flavor milk 
being returned dn one day. 



NOTICE— . 

One 1940 Plymouth 2-door will be 
sold' at auction at B-M Sales & Ser- 
vice, Walton, Ky., January 18, 1950 
at 10:00 a. m. Due for labor, mater- 
ial and repossession on car. 2t-l 



NOTICE — 

One 1939 Lincoln 4-door will be 
sold at auction at B-M Sales & Ser- 
vice, Walton, Ky., January 18, 1950, 
at 10:00 a. m. To settle account for 
labor material and storage. 2t-l 




MICHELS 

WELDING CO. 

722 WASHINGTON S T , Covirwon 
CO 670 



CLEARANCE SALE 

Shoes, Dresses and Hats - One-fourth to One-third Off 
Odd Lots of Blouses, Slips and Robes - Greatly Reduced 

Town & Country Shop 

WALTON? KENTUCKY 



T 



THEANSMR 



ItoVour Toughest 



Plowing Requirements! 




For a plow wid* 
plenty of brute 
strength . . . high 
lift for easy turning 
and transporting . . . 
plus the extra clear- 
ance necessary for 
deep plowing in 
trashy conditions, 
you'll find a John 
Deere Truss-Frame 
Plow unsurpassed. 
Its many features 
make it a real leader 
in two-, three-, and 
four-bottom plow 
value. See us for 
full details . . . soon. 



JOHN DIEM TRUSS-FRAME PLOWS 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 



110 PIKE STREET 



COVINGTON, KY. 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO WITH THE . . . NEW 

KENTUCKIANA 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

Carrollton, Ky. 

The Modern House with Uniform Light! 
\ : \ —TOP THIS— 

Cecil Sebree, Verona, Ky. — Sold 

358 lbs $61.00 

394 lbs. 61.00 

380 lbs. .. :... 61.00 

; 396 lbs. :„- 61.00 

430 lbs. 61.00 

400 lbs : 61.00 

4 1 6 lbs. v 61 .00 

456 lbs. . 61.00 

38q* lbs. 5j . . 50.00 

444' lbs. 3 ; 45.00 

392 lbs. _ . 45.00 m 

LEONARD COOK - - GENERAL MANAGER 
Otha Cook, Field Agent M. F. Judy, Floor Mgr. 

Dave Gaines and Joe Duncan, Auctioneers 
Phil Stallard, Weighman Harold Hedger, Bookk'per 




TOBACCO GROWERS! Sell your tobacco at the Covington 

Independent Tobacco Whse. Co., Erlanger, Ky. 

Just South of Covington, DIXIE HIGHWAY, ROUTES 25 & 42; Out AWAY from RIVER FOG & SMOKE 

Good parking - Clean Rest rooms - Plenty unloading space. NO WAITING! SALES EVERY*OTHER DAY! 

Sell with men who GROW tobacco, who KNOW tobacco and your problems! 

Boyd Elliott, General Manager Dixie 7413 One Hill, Auctioneer 
Ernest Dance, Floor Manager Earl Acra; Weigh Man 
J. W. Grant, Field Man "Grade for grade, no better Nathan Elliott> Field Man 
market in Kentucky . 



30 Head Hish Grade Dairy Cattle 30 

AUCTION 

Saturday, Jan. 1 4 io a. m. 

Location: At the R. L. Bowman farm on Youell Road, just off 
Limaburg-Hebron Road — See Arrows! 



Having decided to quit the dairy business, R. L. Bow- 
man is offering for sale bis fine herd of high grade dairy 
cattle which he has built up over a period of years — 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

This ip a fine high-grade herd comprised of Holsteins, 
Guernseys, Jerseys and Swiss; several with calves by 
side and others to be fresh by day of sale. This is one of 
the finest herds in Northern Kentucky, Bangs tested and 
Straight in every respect. Don't fail to see them — 

Large Holstein, 7 years old, calf by side; 4 Guernseys, 
4 years old, calves by side; Jersey, 5, years ojd, calf by 
side; Holstein, fresh with second calf; Guernsey, 5 years 
old, was fresh in Oct. ; Holstein, 5 years old, was fresh 
in Oct.; Guernsey and Jersey mixed, been fresh eight 
weeks ; Jersey, 6 years old, fresh in Oct. ; Guernsey, 4 
years old, be fresh by day of sale; Holstein, a heavy 
springer, 3 years old; Jersey, 3 years old, giving good 
flow of milk; Guernsey, 6; years old, a heavy springer; 



Holstein, 5 years old, heavy springer; Jersey, 4 years 
old, heavy springer; Jersey, 6 years old, heavy springer; 
Black Pole, 3 years old; Hereford heifer, springer; Black 
Pole bull calf, weigh about 400 lbs. ; Guernsey, 3 years 
old, heavy springer; Holstein, 6 years old, was fresh in 
Sept. ; Black Pole bull, 2 years old, a nice one ; Holstein 
cow, 3 years old, gviing good flow of milk; large Swiss, 
5 years old, heavy springer; Guernsey, 7 years old, giv- 
ing large flow of milk; Guernsey, fresh with third calf; 
Guernsey and Jersey cow mixed, 5 years old, springer; 
W'hiteface cow, fresh with calf by side. 

MISCELLANEOUS: About 1 4 ten-gallon milk cans, 
small milk pails, etc., approximately 4 tons Korean hay, 
baled. v 

FARM: The farm of 108 acres with nice 8-room 
house, good dairy barn for 40 cows, concrete silo, 2.2 
acres tobacco base, all tractor land, will be offered for 
sale privately on or before day of sale. 



R. L. Bowman, Owner 

SALE CONDUCTED BY 

Col. Lute Bradford Auction Co, 

FLORENCE, KENTUCKY PHONES: FLORENCE 229; WALTON 671 

Bradford & Worthington, Auctioneers 
Lucian Bradford, Sales Manager 



Thursday, January 5, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 




Mrs. Dora Fields and Johnnie 
Fields, Mt. and Mrs. Stanley Allen 
and three sons had Christmas din- 
ner with Mrs. Esther Fields and 
children and Mrs. Jesse Allphin of 
Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hayes and 
baby daughter have returned to 
their home here after spending the 
holidays in Owenshoro and Louis- 
ville. 

Miss Carol Kendall has returned 
to Washington, D. C, after spending 
Christmas with her parents, Mr. and 
Mis. Marvin Kendall, and her sister 
Donna. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Hughes were 
the Christmas holiday guests of their 
son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Perry 
Hughes, at Indianapolis. 

Mr. t and Mrs. Matt Flynn and 
family spent Christmas day with 
her motherTMrs. Minnie Roberts, at 
Falmouth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie Connelly of 
Frankfort were New Year's eve 
guests of his father and wife, Mr. 
and Mrs. P. R. Connelly. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Stone left Mon- 
day to spend the winter months with 
their daughter and husband, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. T. Pickett, in Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perry Hughes of In- 
dianapolis, Ind., are receiving con- 
gratulations on the arrival of a lit- 
tle daughter, who has .been named 
Laura Kathleen. They have three 
sons. 

Granville Morton and Josephine 
Rogers of Chattanooga, Tenn., are 



DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

613 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday, 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



guests of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Phillips. 

Mr. and Mrs. MaTvin Pennington 
of Washington, D. C, spent the 
Christmas holidays with her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. R.- M. Daniels of Ve- 
rona Road, and other relatives and 
friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Powers Conrad and 
Mr. and Mrs. Gayle McElroy spent 
the holidays in New Orleans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Edens spent 
their Christmas vacation with rela- 
tives in Tennessee. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crowder and 
daughter Vickie Lynn of Hamilton, 
Ohio spent New Year holidays with 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Carpenter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Lusby, Pam- 
ela, Debby and Denny Lusby, and 
Misses Anna and Mattie Hudson 
spent Christmas day with Mr. and 
Mrs. D. L. Lusby. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Lusby were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Smith 
of Louisville, the past week. 

Mrs. Christine Smith and two 
children are now located in the 
Mabel Johnson apartment. 

Miss Colleen Vallandinghaim was 
the Saturday guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Rodgers in Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Flynn and fam- 
ily and Mrs. J. T. Stone were guests 
of Mt. and Mrs. Wm. House of In- 
dependence, New Year's day. 

Sue and Betty Lou Phillips of 
Crittenden spent the holidays with 
I their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gordon Phillips. 

Little Jimmie Stone was a Christ- 
mas supper guest of Mrs. Abbie Bush 
and daughters, Linda and Ora. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Daniels of 
Walton and Mr. and Mrs. Marvin 
Pennington of Washington, D. C, 
enjoyed Christmas dinner in the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Blaine Daniels 
of Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Stephenson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stephenson, 
Ann Dudgeon and Mrs. Emma Flynn 
spent Christmas day with Mr. and 
Mrs. Clatence Sexton at Erlanger. 

Mrs. Abbie Bush entertained for 
dinner Christmas day, the following 
guests: Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pendck 
and two children, Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Mann, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Bush, 
Mr. and Mrs. Pascal Bush, Linda and 
| Ora Bush, and Mr. and Mrs. Cecil 
Osborn and two children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Johnson, Jr. 
have moved from the Pruett apart - 
|inents, and are now located with her 



parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry May- 
hugh. 

Misses Ruth Ann and Louise Isbell 
of Russell Springs spent the New 
Year's holidays with Mr. and Mrs. 
P. R. Connelly. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Parker had as 
dinner guests Christmas day, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jesse Callen, Mr. and Mrs. 
David Houston, Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Woods and son Albert, Mr. and Mrs. 
Zeke Works, Mr. and Mrs. Toon Park- 
er, Bill Parker and Mr. and Mrs. 
Jimmy 'Reed. 

Mrs. Ollie Horn and Mrs. Lottie 
Petty were holiday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bert, Parker. 

Mrs. Dora Fields and litle grand- 
son, Ronnie Ray Allen, have had 
severe colds during the holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. K. Johnson spent 
Christmas day with their grand- 
daughter and husband, Mr: and Mrs. 
Wm. Parman of Latonia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell Taylor and 
two children of Chattanooga, Tenn., 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dan 
Roberts and family during the hol- 
idays. 

Billy Wynn of Western College, 
Bowling Green, spent the Christmas 
holidays with his. parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ray Wynn. 

John C. Brakefield of Great Lakes, 
111., was the holiday guest of his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Brake- 
field. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnoild Wynn and 
daughter of Russell Springs were the 
holiday guests of his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed Wynn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace "Buster" 
Glenn have moved to "Ruth's Cab- 
ins," where they are now in charge. 

James W. Smith of Key West, Fla., 
is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry Mulford and 
son 'Dewey and his father, Riley 
Mulford of Dayton, Ohio, spent the 
Christmas holidays with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Chapman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Breeden 
spent Christmas with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Estil Hughes of St. 
Albins, West Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Chapman had 
as guests Christmas day: Mr. and 
Mrs. Terry Mulford and son, Mr. and 
Mrs. CliMton 'TBud" Robinson and 
baby, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Chapman, 
Mrs. Charles Mann, Linda and Step- 



hen Mann, Pete Chapman, Riley 
Mulford, Harold and Jeanette Chap- 
man. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Stone had as 
Christmas holiday guests, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Epping, Miss Marie 
Armstrong and Miss Rose Marie 
Petty, all of Richmond, Ind.; Mrs. C. 
T. Pickett and Mr. and Mrs. Eldon 
Pickett of Covington; Dale Myers of 
Erlanger; Mr. and Mrs. Leo Flynn 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Summey, Mr. and Mrs. P. R. Con- 
nelly, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. House and 
A. O. Connelly. 



Public Sale 

Am leaving for the South and will sell my furniture, 
cow, stock truck and tools to the high bidder at 
P1NER, KY.— ON LLL HIGHWAY 

SAT., JAN. 14 

Beginning at 1 : 00 P. M. 

10-ft. refrigerator, electric cook stove, washing ma- 
chine, all General Electric, almost new; medicine cab- 
inet; oil cook stove; coal cook stove; kitchen table and 
4 chairs; 5 table lamps; 5 -piece living room suite; 5- 
piece bed room suite; large heating stove; clocks; radio; 
2 rugs; electric coffeemaker; silverware; dishes; cook- 
ing utensils; chicken brooder; lawn mower; lot of jelly, 
tomatoes, peaches and all kinds of other canned fruit; 
50 chickens; 3 rocking chairs; some garden tools; 1941 
G. M. C. stock truck; Holstein cow, 4 years old, and 
other items too numerous to mention. 



-TERMS CASH- 



Hilton Steinhauser 

... Sale Conducted By 

Harry F. Johnson 

Real Estate & Auction Co. — Phone Ind. 6196 



J 



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— in— 



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THURSDAY • JANUARY 12 
Tim Holt - Richard Martin 
* — In— 

GUN SMUGGLERS 

—Bargain Night- 



Mr. and Mrs. Stanley McElroy of 
Lexington, spent part of the Christ- 
mas holidays with Mr. and Mrs. 
Grover Ransom of Verona, and Mrs. 
Hazel McElroy and family of Wal- 
ton. 



Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hume of Wal- 
ton, had as dinner guests Sunday at 
the Phoendx Hotel, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Johnson and daughter Marie 
of Covington. 

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PHONE 95 



WALTON, KY, 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 5, 1950 



[ FLORENCE NEWS 



Mrs. Rosa Mary Aylor entertained 
on Christmas evening with a six 
o'clock dinner in honor of her im- 
mediate family, six sons, her daugh- 
ter and all the members of their 
families, with the traditional "yule- 
tide festivities. Following the din- 
ner the group had the usual ex- 
change of gifts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Taylor of 
.Erlanger were dinner guests in the 
home of (Mr. and Mrs., Larry Aylor 
and daughter on Friday evening of 
Christmas week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy C. Lutes and Ann 
entertained the Post Office person- 
nel at their home on Montgomery 
Drive .with a Christmas party prior 
to Christmas eve. 

Advance Notice: You and your 
friends will be glad to know the date 
has been set for the next Bingo soc- 
ial to be given at the Fire Hall by 
the Ladies Auxiliary of the Volun- 
teer Fire Dept. Remember the date 
— January 19th. 

We wish to welcome two new fam- 



ilies to the community, on Sweet- 
briar Avenue — the Eger and Russell 
families. 

Mrs. Martha Richards and son Jer- 
ry were holiday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. John O. Richards of Covington. 

Barbee Simpson and Blayne Mil- 
ler of Park Hills spent the Christmas 
holidays with the former's mother 
at Sturgis, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cam Kennedy have 
purchased property on Beaver Road 
near Walton and will occupy same 
in the near future. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Woodwarchen- 
tertained for his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Will Wood/ward, Christmas day. 

Mrs. Charles Carpenter is much 
improved following a siege of ill- 
ness. 

Carl Rouse enjoyed a yuletide din- 
ner in the home of his* cousins, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Porter of Burling- 
ton. 

Mr. and M|6. Otis ROuse of Burl- 
ington are visiting their son, Elbert 
and family, of Miami, Fla. 




Our town was very resplendent 
with decorations for the holidays. 
The large, brightly lighted tree in 
front of the iFire Hall attracted much 
attention, as did the chimes that 
rang out from the Methodist Church 
belfry and Ackley's Drive-In. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Stephenson and 
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Stephenson en- 
tertained with a Christmas dinner 
party, including as guests Clayton 
Brown and family, Dave Wlngate 
and family and Sydney Ambrose 
and wife. 

Logan county has a 4-H club en- 
rollment of about 500 members. 

The two-millionth tree In Callo- 
way county planted in the forestry 
oevelopment program was placed on 
the Murray State College Campus. 



Public Sale 

My work has. moved me to Florida and I will sell my 
three rooms of furniture at Auction, to the high dollar, 
at my grandfather's home, known as the John Tom 
Roberts place on ' 

Stephenson Mill Road 

Saturday, Jan. 7 



Beginning at 1:00»P. M. 

Two-piece living room suite; lounge chair and otto- 
man; wool rug, 9x12; Kenmore vacuum cleaner and 
attachments; 2 end tables; Heatrola; 3-way floor lamp; 
3-piece Maple bed room suite with springs and inner- 
spring mattress; Tapan deluxe philgas range; Westing- 
house refrigerator, 7 ft.; glass door utility cabinet; din- 
ette table and 4 chairs. This furniture is almost new and 
in extra good shape. If you want good furniture, don't 
miss this sale. Also lots of other items too numerous to 
mention. 

Mrs. Lucile Runion 

N. D. Moore Farm - Stephenson Mill Road 

Sale Conducted By 

Harry F. Johnson 

. Real Estate & Auction Co.— Phone Ind. 6196 




35 HEAD OF CHOICE REGISTERED & GRADE 
WISCONSIN & IMPORTED CANADIAN COWS 

Saturday, Jan. 7 

At 10:30 a. m.- . - 

I will sell at my barn located 1 2 miles West of Frank- 
fort and 8 miles East of Shelbyville at Peytona, Ky., on 
U. S. 60, the following: 

A clean herd of choice fresh^nd close springer Dairy 
Cows, five of which are registered imported Canadian 
Holstein cows with papers and good blood lines, and 
plenty of breeding. These cows have style, type and 
producing ability and are cows that are capable of pro- 
ducing 50 to 70 pounds daily. 

Also 30 head of choice fresh and close springer Grade 
Holstein cows from Wisconsin. These are large cows 
with style, type and good color; all these cows are T.'B. 
and Bangs tested and are young, from 3 to 6 years of 
age. | If you are interested in choice cows, both registered 
and grade. Attend this auction. 

Inspection Invited Any Time! Terms Cash! — 

Edward Masters 

SHELBYVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Phones: Residence, Waddy 2539; Barn, Waddy 2704 

AUCTIONEER: J. HAYDEN IGLEHEART 



Lots of folks complain that the money 
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firm's Payroll Savings Flan, or — if this 
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from you. In fact, every $3 you invest — 
In the safest Investment in the world — 
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V S Treasury Dt&mmtmt 



R. E. Tanner and wife entertained 
at dinner Qhristmas night for R. F. 
Woodward and wdfe and P. J. Allen 
and wife. 

Renaker Miller and Miss Allee 
Sayexs were quleMde dinner guests 
of Miss Ruth Best at the hotel Sin- 
ton, Cincinnati. Miss Best is a well 
known soprano and radio star. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Denham, Sr., 
were host and hostess with a turkey 
dinner Christmas for their son, Sam 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Dolwick, Jr. 
were 'host and hostess with a family 
dinner party Christmas day. The 
menu consisted of turkey and all 
the accessories, and guests included 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. Miller, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. R. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. M. 
M. Graham of Park Hills, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Mogan, Mrs. Scott and 
Mrs. Naney, all of Covington, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Homer Eads and dau- 
ghter Sally Jo of Chattanooga, Tehn. 




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Alan "Rocky" Lane — in 

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hit no. 2 

Jimmie Davis — In 

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Thursday, January 5, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Seven 



DAIRYING NEAR TOP 
ON KENTUCKY FARMS 

Dairying now ranks second only 
to tobacco as a source of income on 
Kentucky farms, according to the 
Agricultural Experiment Station at 
Lexington. Total state income from 
dairying may exceed $150,000,000 in 
1949. 

Increase dn alfalfa, clovers and 
other hay craps and more and better 
grass are encouraging dairying. 
With restricted acreages In tobacco 
and other cultivated crops, most 
farms have labor .to milk a few cows 




When The Crash 

Comes — Be 

Protected 

pS^&tutual Insurance 
^^ Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON, STY. 



or keep other livestock. With home- 
grown feeds, and often home-pro- 
duced stock, profits are almost as- 
sured. * 

Farmers in more than half of the 
counties in Kentucky are now using 
artificial breeding to improve their 
herds. 

CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to thank everyone for the 
donations and the (help they have 
"given us since the time our home 
was destroyed by fire.- Your kind- 
ness shall never be forgotten. 

Mr. and 'Mrs. Lawrence Poole 
lt-1* and Balby 

Homemakers clubs in Meade co- 
unty are working wiith other agen- 
cies to obtain .better telephone ser- 
vice iin the county. 

Don Redford of Hart county, dis- 
trict corn champion, produced 138.9 
bushels per acre, top county yield 
in four years of the Corn Derby. 



QUICK RELIEF FROM 

Symptom* of Distress Arising from 

STOMACH ULCERS 
due to EXCESS ACID 

FrooBookTellsofHomeTreatmentthat 
Must Help or It Will Cost You Nothing 

Over three million bottles of the Willa w> 
Tbbatmbwt have been sold for relief of 
symptoms of distress arising from Stomach 
and Duodenal Ulears doe to beam Add— 
Poor Digestion, Sour or Upatt Stomach, 
Q— llnw, Heartburn, SleepleunMS, etc. 
duotoExcasa Acid. Sold on 15 days' trtolt , 
Ask for "WUIanl's Meuage" which folly 
explains this treatment — frat — at 

R. C. Brakef ield. Druggist, Walton 



,smm<wv 



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There Is (ART) In A RTISTIC 

—FREE CALL & DELIVERY— 
16 South Main St. Phone 144 Walton, Ky. 



Fur Coats Cleaned & Glazed 

Altering Invisible Reweaving 

Relining Dyeing 

Leather and Suede Jackets Refinished Like New 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quality Work . . . Guaranteed 
— All Garments Insured — 



I. C. GAINES Prop. DAVE WORKMAN 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for dally market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Toads 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market in the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to us. Why 
not now? 

Reference: Ask the first 
man you meet 






I 



NEW SHIPMENT . . . 

AGRICO 

FERTILIZER 

6-8-6 — Cheaper than Last Year 
—BETTER ORDER NOW— 

Walton & Readnour 

PHONE 154 k WALTON, KY. 



Lovingly, 
Temple 

By Richard Hill Wilkinson 

DEAR TEMPLE: I was indeed 
glad to learn that you had ob- 
tained such a satisfactory position. 
I am sure that you will make a 
most efficient secretary.. Frankly, I 
have been entertaining some mis- 
givings about your future. Serving 
in the capacity of guardian to mod- 
ern young ladies is, after all, hardly 
in my line, although I was only too 
_______^ glad to look 

after the daugh- 

3 -Minute ter of my close 
"di" I isiai, £s 

he so unexpect- 
edly passed away. I Imagine you 
are quite a grown up young lady 
now, though it is hard for me to 
visualize you in any other form 
than a girl in pigtails and short 
dresses — " 

Aaron Bell, 34, looking 10 years 
younger, abruptly ceased dictating 
and stared hard at his stenographer. 
The stenographer, Miss Daniels by 
name, was small, dark, vivacious 
and exceedingly attractive. She had 
come to work in the law office of 
Attorney Aaron Bell two weeks pre- 
vious. She was a capable girl, yet for 
SrJme unexplainable reason Aaron 
hadn't been able to get used to her. 
That is to say. ne felt nervous 
whenever he was dictating letters. 

During the next few days 
Aaron began to get an inkling 
ow why it was that he felt on- 
easy when dictating letters to 
Miss Daniels. He began to won- 
der if heretofore he hadn't been 
attempting to evade an issue. 
He asked himself, secretly, If 
Miss Daniels was becoming to 
mean more to him than just a 
secretary. 

•pWO.DAYS LATER Aaron was 
* rudely swept out of the realm 
of ecstasy (a state of mind brought 
about by his dinner date with Miss 
Daniels), by receiving another let- 
ter from his ward. 

"Dear Guardian: My boss is real- 
ly quite lovely, and has been dis- 
playing an unusual amount of in- 
terest in me since my last letter. 



me siumoenng romance mat lurks 
within the breast of every man, or 
it might have been the simple de- 
sire of a man for a mate. At any 
rate Aaron took Miss Daniels in his 
arms and kissed her and whispered 
nonsensical things that somehow 
seemed to fit the occasion. 
•PHE NEXT MORNING he found 
*■ another letter from Temple 
Creighton on his desk. "Dear 
Guardian: I'm j sorry, but com- 
mands and demands from folks 
like 'you don'l. mean a thing when 
a girl is in love. And your little 
Temple is certainly in love. I ex- 
pect she'll be proposed to in the 
very near future." 

Aaron buzzed for Miss Dan- 
iels. "Dear Temple: This thing 
has gone far enough. It's a pity 
you couldn't have been en- 
dowed with at least a fraction 
of your father's good sense. 
It Is my wish that you Immed- 
iately send me the name and 
address of this boss of yours. 
I shall write to him at once." 

$ Aaron had hoped that that night 
be would find himself courageous 
enough to offer a proposal of mar- 
riage to Miss Daniels. Yet when 
again they were seated on the cliff 
watching the moon come up out of 
the ocean, his courage failed. 

Heavy-eyed he went to the office 
next morning to find a letter await- 
ing him from Temple Creighton. 
"Dear Guardian: You were right. 
He isn't the man I thought he was. 
Apparently he has just been amus- 
ing himself, with no idea of asking 
me to marry him. I do wish*you'd 
talk to him. His name is Aaron Bell. 
Lovingly, Temple." 



In Allen county, about 6,000 acres 
have been sowed to Ky ; 31 fescue, 
Ladino clover being used with a 
third of it. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

HMi\1tiT?Tro corp. 

UMwA^JE* A • ao-7 m„j:._ a„„ r~„ 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 




At any rate, Aaron took Miss 
Daniels in his arms and kissed 
her . . . 

I am not a little flattered by his at- 
tention and very much thrilled. In 
fact, I believe I could fall in love 
with him very easily." 

Aaron rang for Miss Daniels. 
"Dear Temple: I demand that you 
resign from your present position 
at once. It's silly and absurd to 
think of a girl your age falling in 
love, esspecially with a man who 
makes love to every stenographer 
he employs." 

That night Aaron .suggested a 
drive through the country and was 
delighted when Miss Daniels ac- 
cepted. It was a beautiful June eve- 
ning, with a full moon and a cool- 
ing breeze blowing off the ocean. 
It might have been the atmospher- 
ic conditions which stirred to life 



STURGEON 

Electrical Service 

—Wiring of All Kinds— 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 
— Phone 71 or 1396— 



I 



' For Food, Fun 
and Recreation 

Visit ... Ye Olde 
> 

Friendly Frogstool Inn 

WALTON. KY. 
Open 9 a. m. to 1 a. m. Daily 

Food, Beer, Pool 

Modern Rest Rooms 

Serving the Public Over 20 Years 

H. B. HUBBARD, Prop. 




Grinding and Mixing 

We do custom grinding and mixing ... we furnish 
the concentrates .•'. . youjurnish the grain- 
Here are some formulas— 

1 00 lbs. Ground Corn 
50 lbs. Ground Oats 
100 lbs. Master Mix Laying Mash Concentrate 

250 lbs. 20% Egg Mash 

3% Fat ' Cost— $3.81 per 100 lbs. 
8% Fibre L — — r- 



200 lbs. 
100 lbs. 

300 lbs. 



Ground Corn on Cob 
33% Dairy Concentrate 

16% Dairy 

3% Fat Cost— $2.93 per 100 lbs. 

9% Fibre 



Walton Feed Mill 

(Incorporated) 
\. WALTON, KY. PHONE 57 



L. J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

' and 



I PRICES REDUCED FOR 1950 

I USED CARS 



4-Door - Dark Grey 
Radio, Heater, Hydromatic 



OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 



1948 PONTIAC 

1947 FORD 4D °° r ' Radi °- Heater 



$1695 
$1145 




1/0(1§G 1939 Coupe 

V/IIlY. 1939 2-Door, Clean — s — 

ft* 

lUn 1 • 1937 2-Door. Nice Buy — 

PLYM. 



1941 



*395 
'495 
'395 
'695 



PLYM. 



$ 

1949 Sedan, Radio, Heater 



plirU 1946 Station Wagon 
LnCY. Radio, Heater 1 



1895 
1045 



LiitiY. 1946 • Very aeon - 

PONT. 



1947 4-Door, Radio. * 

Heater - Perfect Cond. __ 



'1295 

1295 



n 

■ 



S Most can have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 

• All are one-owner cars traded in on the NEW '49 PONTIACS. 

S Terms to Suit - Up to 24 Months to Pay! 

I Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 



C 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 5, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION 3^^ 



Classified advertising rate is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash in advance. 



SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE— All, nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing (Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf-1 



FOR SALE— Used, Model LA John 
Deere tractor, plow, cultivator and 
mower; Allis-Ohalmer "C" tractor, 
plows and cultivator. Butler Bros., 
Nicholson" Phone Ind. 5053. tf-49 

FOR RENT— -House, newly decorat- 
ed; electric; conveniently located; 
no pets; anyone using intoxicants 
need not apply; tobacco base. Call 
Williamstown 4495. lt-1 

FOR SALE — 1946 %-ton Chevrolet 
truck with flat bed and racks. 
Phone Walton 106, or see A. D. 
Warner, Walton, Ky. 2t-l 

AUTOMATIC fire protection is cheap 
insurance on your home, garage, 
church, etc. Why not investigate 
now. Send postal card to Red 
Comet Service Co., 834 Aflhambra 
Ct„ P. H„ Coving ton, Ky, lt-1* 

FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
First class work, guaranteed, good 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf-2 

WANT TO BUY— Dead Stock; horses 
$2.50; cows $2.50; hogs 50c cwt., 
according to size and condition. 
Phone Walton, day 178, night 772, 
or Butler 690*1. Griffin Fertilizer 
Co. t tf-1 



FOR SALE— 7 heifers and 8 steers, 
weigh about 300 lbs. O. L. Easton, 
2% miles East of Devon on Bristow 
Road. Phone Ind. 6216. 2t-l 



FOR SALE-^All kinds of Oak Lum- 
ber, fancing planks. All types of 
dressed lumber. Stevens Lumber 
dealer, Phone Florence 419. tf-50 

LOST— (Fix hound, white, black and 
tan spotted female, wearing col- 
lar. James Tupman, Florence, Ky. 
Liberal reward. Please call Jay 
Webster, Walton 1240. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE — Jim Brown, model 6, 
Hammermill; purebred Aberdeen- 
Angus yearling heifer, and riding 
saddle. A. W. Franz, Green Road. 
Phone Ind. 6747. 2t-l* 



FOR SALE— iHatchet mill, Smalley 
No. 5, mounted with 5-horse elec- 
tric motor; brand new, will sell for 
half. Rosegate Farm, Dixie High- 
way. 2t-l* 

FOR RENT— Power Chain Saws with 
one man $3.50 per hour. Phone 
Florence 419. ' tf-50 



FOR SALE — Kenton county farm, \ 
close in, good dairy or tobacco 
land, in blue grass, house, barn. I 
Owner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, I 
Ky. 4t-l* 



FOR SALE— Fat hogs, weigh 225 lbs. 
John L. Feagan, Walton-Beaver I 
Road, Walton, Ky. 2t-l*i 



COVINGTON 

Ef-Ko ARMY Store 

5th and MADISON 

FOR MORE THAN 



27 y. 



FOR SALE— Cheap, battery brooder, 
1,000-ohick capacity; steam oper- 
ated. Ind. 6757. Box 14, Decoursey 
Pike, White Villa. 2t-l* 



FOR SALE — Beautiful wine color 
two piece living room suite; also 
chair and floor lamps, used only 
six months. Rosegate Farm, Dixie 
Highway. 2t-l* 



WASTED TO BUY— Several 1000 ft. 
of Ash, Oak and Walnut lumber 
in the tree. Call Florence 419. 

tf-50 



YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. tf-46 



ears 

WE'VE ALWAYS SOLD 

Good 

Work 

Shoes 

We fit small feet, large feet 
narrow feet wide feetl 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

STORE 

508 MADISON AVENUE 
COVINGTON 



I CONRAD HARDWARE! 



Hamilton & Jones 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



. Invites You to Shop! 



V 



GIGANTIC AFTER 
INVENTORY SALE 

PRICES SLASHED 



2.98 Ladies' House Dresses $2.25 

Ladies' House Dresses $1.19 

Children's Dresses 89c 

Girls' Dresses $1.25 

Ladies' Felt Hats _ $1.00, $1.79, $2.29 

Ladies' Purses 79c and $1.00 

Ladies' Change Purses 30c and 50c 

Remnants of Yard Goods 

Earrings 55c pr., 2 pr. $1.00 

Scatter Pins . 55c 

Pearls, long strings $1.00 

Cigarette Lighters (fancy) '. $5.00 

Tie Holders $1.00 

2.98 Men's Pajamas (A only) .... $1.79 

Girls' Skirts (wool) ......... $1.00 

Ladies' Skirts (wool) ... $1.00 

Lace Collars 50c 

Girls' White Cotton Blouses 50c 

(sizes 5 to 12) 

Boys' Sport Shirts .... 79c 

(short sleeves) 

Ladies' Housecoats ... $1.39 

(small sizes -;orig. 3.98) 

Broken Sizes 
No Exchange On 



Boys' Polo Shirts ... 79c 

Anklets 15c 

Men's Colored Polo Shirts 79c 

Men's Mufflers (colors) JL $1.00 

Jackets . $1.00 

Boys' Ties 39c and 49c 

Ear Muffs . A 10c 

Little Girls' Knitted Bonnets 15c 

Baby Bonnets 59c 

Ladies' Houseslippers $1.00 

(assorted styles and sizes) 

Knitted Suits 79c 

Little Boys' Pajamas $1.25 

Boys' Caps (odds) r „ 39c 

Men's Caps 39c 

Boys* Coveralls 79c 

Men's Work Pants $1.49, $1.59, $2.49 

Boys' Wool Pants $1.79 

Boys' Light Weight Overalls ..... $1.65 

Boys' Ctoon Pants $1.65 

Men's Neckties . 79c 

1.98 Ladies' Uniforms .... $1.39 

Wool Flannel, 54" wide ....... 98c yd. 

Ladies' Better Dresses $5.00, $6.50, up 

Assorted Styles 
These Purchases 





New! OLD ENGLISH! 

J\ Cream Wax 
POLISH 

6 ox. 25* S# 

For your fin«it fumltur*. 



IS THE 
FLOOR WAX 
WOMEN PREFER 

£atf5 and teMft'/ 

65c Pt. $1.10 Qt. 




Oil Mop— 79c 





ALL ALUMINUM, mailbox NAME- 
PLATE, complete with bolts, nuts and 
brackets for mounting in any of the 
three positions shown — 

Single Nameplate $1.00 

Double Nameplate $1.75 




— $39.50— 



BLACK 
FLAG 



Contains Chlordane (1068) 
-the finest roach killer 
known. 



ROACH 
SPRAT 

50C PINT 

85* per Qoart 



for Service 



targe or Small 



See Power* 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES 0I : HOUSEHOLD 
™™ ., APPLIANCES 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKY 



TREES— Trimmed, topped and re- 
moved. Stevens Forestry Service, 
Phone Florence 419 or JU-5553. 

tf-50 

FOR RENT— Modern ifcwO-room and 
private bath unfurnished apart- 
ment 35 South Main St., Wal- 
ton. lt-1* 

PLUMBING & HEATTNG-^Repairs or 
new installations, furnace clean- 
ing and service on stokers, gas or 
oil furnaces. Tri -County Heating 
and Plumbing Co., Florence 593. 

tf-49 



WANTED — Woman to assist with 
housework, help care for invalid 
lady. Must stay all the time. Ph. 
Ind. 5067W. Lena J. Mills, Inde- 
pendence, Ky. lt-1* 



SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if order- 
ed before. January 1. For prices 
and information, call A. R. Kwo- 
zalla, Erlanger, Ky., Route 4. Fl. 
593. tf-49 



HAY FOR SALE~3aled, good Kor- 
ean and red top mixed; priced 
right for quick sale. J. M. Marsh, 
Box 189, Burlington, Ky. 4t-48* 



FOR \RENT — i room apartment on 
South Main. 98 South Main, Wal- 
ton. 2t— 51* 



FOR SALE— Beautiful all white Phil- 
gas stove; also Philgas water heat- 
er, and room heater. Rosegate 
Farm, Dixie Highway. 2t-l* 



BARGAIN, New Spinet Piano— Why 
buy an unknown make, second 
hand piano from an unknown 
party, when Kentucky's greatest 
music store offers you a new, 
standard brand piano, free service 
and . Shackleton's guarantee, all 
for tine same price? Special, from 
now until Chirdstmas, os as long 
as they last, we are offering to the 
readers of irMs advertisement the 
reliable Standard Brand New 
Cable Spinet Piano for only $595, 
on .terms less than rent, $4.00 
weekly. Phone ( reversing charges 
for full information) or write us 
for illustrated catalog ait -once. 
The quantity of pianos is Mimited. 
SHACKLETON PIANO CO., 621 
South Fourth Street, Louisville 2, 
Kentucky. 9t-43 



WANTED— Someone to raise nine- 
tenths acre of tobacco on shares 
or money rent, on the J. W. Step- 
henson farm; also some fence to 
be built. Call at 74 South Main St., 
Walton. Erma Stockman. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE — Purebred Duroc boar 
hog. P. J. Maddin, Walton, Route 
2. Phone Walton 271. 2t-51 

FOR KENT— Cash or shares; 101-aere 
farm, located off Richardson Pike, 
Kenton county; 4% acres alfalfa, 
other meadow, and cropland; good 
pasture; small tobacco allotment; 
good 4-room house; available Jan- 
uary. Inquire Riley's Store, Rich 
ardson Pike. 3t-51* 



FOR SALE— Judson field metal rol- 
ler, 9 feet wide, never used; come 
make me an offer. Rosegate Farm, 
Dixie Highway. 2t-l* 

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — K works, 
it pays, it gets calves. Sign up in 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M, Tay- 
lor, Walton 582. tf-45 



Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued on Page 4) 



IFOR SALE — Norge Fas-Temp oil 
heater, 85,000 B. T. U.; also Craft- 
man Jig saw, 18-inch. Ray Ack- 
man, Walton, Route 2. lt-1* 



FOR SALE — 'Looking for appliances, 
such as Refrigerators, Washers, 
Deep Freeze, Heaters, Radios, used 
or new, call Independence 6585. 
Myron Stephens. 40t-47* 




1941 Olds 4-Door 
1941 Pontiac 2-Door 
1939 Pontiac 4-Door 
1938 Chevrolet 4-Door 
1937 Chevrolet T-Door 



1935 Plymouth Coupe 
Used Trucks — - 

1939Chev. \y 2 ton dump 
1939 White 2]/ 2 ton dump 
1946G. M. C. 2 ton 






Heavy Duty Wrecker Service - 

Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. 5004 



Also Cooking, 
Water Heating 
and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 



WALTON, KY. 



■ ■ 



s 



I 






'4 ft*. 




to$ r*w 

***** 



' c '-.-; e 



?**« 



WALT 





— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY — BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 




PUBUSHIM 1 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1950 



Volume 35: — Number 2 



Burley Demand Strong 
—Price Change Slight 



Demand for Burley tobacco con- 
tinued strong when sales were re- 
sumed on January 4th. The Federal- 
State Market News Service jeports 
average prices for grades showed 
only slight changes as compared 
with averages established during the 
last three pre-holiday sales. The 
fluctuations, mostly around $1.00, 
were considered normal. Volume of 
offerings was heavier because of the 
added one-half hour to daily selling 
time. For the three day week, end- 
ing January 6, gross sailes amounted 
to 61,445,600 pounds for an average 
of $47.69 per hundred. The pound- 
age was around 4% million more 
than for the previous three days. 
The average was 45c higher. Sea- 
son gross sales were brought to 
384,458,500 pounds for $46.64 per 
hundred. 

Changes in average prices were 
mostly for leaf and tip grades, with 
losses and gains nearly equally di- 
vided. Lugs and flyings were about 
steady. The majority of heavy vol- 
ume grades were unchanged. 

Some improvement in quality was 
reflected }n slightly larger propor- 
tions of fair and good leaf and good 
flyings and Jugs. There were less 
low tips, flyings and nondescript. 
Most sales, however, continued to 
consist principal^ of low and fair 
leaf, tips and lugs, low to good fly- 
ings and nondescript. 

Receipts of the Associations, under 
the Government loan program, were 
estimated at 2 to 3 percent of bas- 
kets offered. Through December 21, 
Association deliveries were about 
13% million pounds or slightly over 
4 percent of grass sales reported be- 
fore Christmas. 

Deliveries to warehouses were re- 
ported to have slowed up consider- 
ably this week. This was partially 
attributed to weather conditions, but 
many are of the opinion that some 
markets, especially in middle Tenn- 
essee, are about out of offerings and 
have almost completed their selling 
season. Some markets may close 
next week. It is anticipated that a 
number of smaller markets will be 
closed by January 20. 

C. N. Taylor Speaks To 
Kiwanis Club In Tennessee 

Rev. C. N. "Deac" Taylor of Wal- 
ton, Ky., who is a ministerial stu- 
dent at the Temple College of the 
Bible in Chattanooga, was the guest 
of his brother-in-law, Chas. Powers 
at the Waynesboro (Tenn.) Kiwanis 
Club meeting last Friday and made 
an address to the club that was 
greatly appreciated. 

Mr. Taylor was a native of Som- 
erset and visited here some years 
ago as a ball player on the Somerset 
high school team. He attended 
Georgetown College for some time 
with the intention of becoming a 
minister, but dropped out and later 
became a whiskey merchant in 
Walton. When his small son began 
visiting the saloon and wanting to 
stay there, he realized he was in the 
wrong business and got out; be- 
came a member of the church, and 
then (began studying for the minis- 
try. Since then his son died and 
he realized more than ever that Tfe 
did the right thing when he quit 
the whiskey business and began his 
studies for the ministry. It was a 
splendid address and probably 
would have had a great deal more 
effect if 400 men of Wayne county 
could have heard it instead of the 
40 (members of the club. 

We do not think very much of the 
street preaching. We think it is 
just a money-making proposition in 
most cases, but if Rev. Taylor could 
have made that talk from the Dough- 
boy Park, Saturday, when the town 
was full of people, we cant but 
think it would have done some good. 
—Wayne County News. 

Blue Cross Enrollment 

The month of January has been 
designated as Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation enrollment month for all 
Farm Bureau (members.. During this 
month old members can enroll, and 
this will probably be the only month 
this year in which enrollment for 
old members will be open. New 
members can enroll within thirty 
days after joining the Farm Bureau. 

Further (particulars may be ob- 
tained from John E. Crigler, secre- 
tary, Burlington. 



Verona Homemakers 

The Verona Homemakers met in 
the home of Mrs. Geraldine Harris on 
January 6th with eight members and 
one visitor present. Mrs. Edith Ham- 
ilton had charge of the business ses< 
sion. Mrs. Pearl Lamn gave a re- 
port on a visit to the County Infirm- 
ary, which we were glad to hear. 
She said conditions were good and 
the six men, two women and two 
children were happy. She took gifts 
from our club. , 

After a lovely lunch, Mrs. Steven- 
son gave the program of scripture 
readings and talks. Mrs. Ethel Fooks 
gave the first lesson on Millinery. 

Present were Mrs. Ethel Fooks, 
Mrs. Edith Hamilton, Mrs. Ura Rob- 
erts, Mrs. Grace Renaker, Mrs. Pearl 
Lamn, Mrs. Pierolena Kannady, Mrs. 
Lillian Stevenson, Mrs. Susie Clore 
and the hostess and children. — Pub. 
Chm. 

Annual Farm Bureau 

Meeting January 12th 

The annual meeting of the Boone 
County Farm Bureau will be held in 
the Courthouse, Burlington at 8:00 
p. m., Thursday, January 12. • 

Two directors will be elected from 
each community. Officers of the 
Associated Women will also be 
elected. 

John Koons of the State Farm Bu- 
reau and Mrs. Roberts of the Assoc- 
iated Women will be present to ad- 
dress the members. Refreshments 
will be served immediately follow- 
ing the meeting. 

S. K. Alumni Dance 

On Saturday night, January 14th, 
the Simon Kenton Alumni Associa- 
tion will have a dance and get- 
together at the Simon Kenton High 
School, following the basketball 
game In which the Simon Kenton 
Pioneers play the Florence Knights. 
This is the home-coming game. 

All graduates of Simon Kenton, 
Independence and Piner High Schols 
are invited to this dance and get- 
together. 



County Red Cross 
Expresses Thanks 
For Contributions 



The Boone County Red Cross wish- 
es to thank all those throughout the 
county who sent in clothing and 
toys to be distributed to the less for- 
tunate at Christmas. We are grate- 
ful to be considered as the agent to 
give out these things to those who 
need them and we are also grateful 
to be considered a part of the won- 
derful Christian spirit which prompt- 
ed those who gave. As one man 
said in Florence, "we cannot prevent 
trouble, but we can .help when it 
comes." Sincere thanks goes to 
those organizations who gave, bas- 
kets of food and came to us and 
asked what families we knew who 
needed these baskets. No public or 
general appeal was sent out, and 
for that reason, it is doubly wonder- 
ful how people gave. 

One church had each child in the 
congregation bring a wrapped toy 
and put in on the Christmas tree at 
the church for needy children in the 
county. These gaily wrapped toys 
were put into a. huge box and 
brought to the office of the Red 
Cross for distribution. All things 
have (been given and we want every 
one to know how much pleasure 
they afforded the receivers, espec- 
ially the little children and their 
parents, for every mother and fa- 
ther want their children to have a. 
happy Christmas, and through your 
generosity many children will re- 
member this Christmas all their 
lives. 

In order to give the "best possible 
help Boone County Red Cross would 
like to ask .that anyone needing the 
services of this organization in any 
way, apply directly to Mrs. Eliza- 
beth G. Nestor, Executive Secretary, 
Florence. Telephone Florence 84. It 
has come to our notice that messages 
have (been given others to deliver to 
us and valuable time has been lost 
because of this, said Mrs. Ne$*or. 
For best results to yourself and the 
Red Cross, please come directly to 
the office, which is located in Flor- 
ence. 



CHARLES VEACH 

Charles Veach, 61, died in Wal- 
ton last Saturday, following a heart 
attack. He was a former resident 
of Fort Thomas, and a member of 
a prominent Northern Kentucky 
family. 

He is survived by two sisters, Miss 
Elizabeth Veach of Huntington, W. 
Va., and Mrs. Laura Cuni of Glen- 
dale, Calif. 

Funeral services were-held in the 
Chambers & Grubbs funeral home, 
Walton, Tuesday at 11:00 a. m., with 
burial following in Highland Ceme- 
tery. 



Mrs. Gaines Hostess 
To Literary Club 
On January 4 



Mrs. Alan H. Gaines was the 
gracious hostess Wednesday after- 
noon, January 4th for the regular 
meeting of the Walton Woman's 
Literary Club. 

The president, Mrs. Wendell W. 
Rouse, presided over the business 
session. Mrs. J. C. Mayhugh was 
welcomed as a new member, and 
was named as chairman of the Safe- 
ty Committee. 

Mrs. S. D. S. Ransom gave the 
spiritual guidance with an excell-- 
ent talk on "The Little We Know 
About A Woman of the Bible," bas- 
ing her remarks on Romans 16:1, "I 
commend unto you, Phoebe, our sis- 
ter, who is a servant of the church." 
Miss Jean Chambers, program lead- 
er, gave a thorough and interesting 
review of the book, "Peace of Mind," 
by Dr. Joshua Liebman. This book 
deals with problems which confront 
all members of society. Following 
adjournment the hostess served at- 



Fire Losses In Walton $385.00 
In 1949, According to Report 



The annual drive for funds to 
r.^tive refreshments, whUe a ple£3flr|<i€*rt infantile paralysis will run 



ant social hour was enjoyed 

Guests present were Mrs. C. W. 
Thompson, Miss Marie Chambers, 
Miss Anna Hudson, Miss Mattie 
Hudson, Mrs. Dan W. Bedinger, Mrs. 
J. M. Jack, Mrs. Wallace K. Grubbs, 
Mrs. John L. Vest, Miss Louise Con- 
rad and Mrs. Joe Berkshire. 

Members present were Mrs. Sam 
B. Sleet, Mrs. Wendell W. Rouse, 
Mrs. S. D. S. Ransom, Mrs. C. W. 
Ransler, Mrs. John Myers, Miss Em- 
ma Jane Miller, Mrs. D. L. Lusby, 
Mrs. A. R. Johnson, Mrs. Alan H. 
Gaines, Mrs. Barnette W. Franks, 
Mrs. J. R. Conrad, Miss Jean Cham- 
bers, Mrs. C. F. Blankenbeker, Mrs. 
John C. Bedinger, Mrs. C. S. Cham- 
bers, Mrs. J. C. Mayhugh, Mrs. Leo 
Flynn, Mrs. J. L. Hamilton, Mrs. 
Clayton Jones, Mrs. H. F. Mann, Mrs. 
Grover C. Ransom, Mrs. W. O. Rouse, 
Mrs. E. B. Wallace, and Mrs. W. D. 
Scroggin. 

Skating Party Tonight 

The Beta Club of Simon Kenton 
High school is sponsoring a skating 
party at the Walton <Rollerdrome on 
January 12th. The public is invited. 
Door prizes will be given. 



Beechgrove Homemakers . 

The December meeting of the 
Beechgrove Homemakers Club was 
held at the Latonia Gun Club. Mrs. 
Wm. P. Meyer, president, presided 
over the business session, which was 
very short. Members responded to 
roll call by telling of their most en- 
joyable Xmas. Mrs. Meyer appoint- 
ed four women to help deliver toys 
(which the club had repainted), fruit 
and candy to six needy families in 
Kenton county. A three-course lun- 
cheon was served by Mrs. Bryan 
Armstrong and Mrs. Louis Lee. The 
afternoon was taken up by exchang- 
ing Xmas gifts and singing Xmas 
carls. Sixteen members were pres- 
ent. Mrs. F. M. Powers gave two 
versions of "The Night Before Christ- 
mas." Mrs. Wanda Works gave the 
lesson on exterior beautification. 

The next meeting will be held Jan- 
uary 19th at the club.— Pub. Ohm. 



Boone Quota For 
March of Dimes 
Set at $2,000 



Boone duty's quota for the 1950 
March of Dimes has been set at 
$2,000, Ben F. Zimmer, Jr., county 
campaign director announced this 
week. The state quota for the cam- 
paign is $500,000. 



Nicholson- Atwood 

Homemakers Meet 

The January meeting of the Nich- 
olson-Atwood Homemakers Club was 
held on Wednesday, Jan. 4 at the 
home of Mrs. F. D. Cooke. 

Roll call was answered by mem- 
bers telling of "My most embarras- 
ing moment." The business session 
was conducted by the president, 
Mrs. John R. Loomis. 

A story entitled, "My Club Work" 
was given by Mrs. R. C. Hinsdale, 
and a lesson on Exterior Beautifica- 
tion was given Iby Mrs. Alfred 
B'Hymer. 

The Atlantic Pact and the United 
Nations was the subject for a most 
interesting talk by Mrs. J. C. May- 
hugh, Jr Mrs. John C. Cain con- 
ducted two games, and prizes were 
awarded the winners. 

Instructions on refinishing furn- 
iture, and a demonstration of the 
methods used was very capably giv- 
en by Mrs. Clifford Cornelius. 

Members present were Mrs. John 
R. Loomis, J. C. Cain, H. L. Pitcher, 
Steve Durr, J. C. Mayhugh, Jr., Les- 
lie Wagner, Arlie Young, Frank 
Stagman, S. C. Fisk, R. C.Durr, Al- 
fred B'Hymer, Ira Stephenson, John 
Butler, Clifford Cornelius, T. L. 
Bishop, Miss Zelma E. Byerly, and 
the hostesses, Mrs. Frank Cooke, 
Raymond Dickson and R. C. Hins- 
dale. 

Fish and Game Club Dance 

The Gallatin County Fdsh and 
Game Club is sponsoring a square 
and round dance at their new olub 
house on Route 16, near Napoleon, 
on Thursday, January 26th, begin- 
ning at 7:30 p. m., Central Time. 
Music will be furnished by Uncle 
! Frank Miller's band from radio sta- 
te 



from January 14 to 31. 

"Never has the need been greater," 
Mr. Zimmer declared. And he added 
that with .the heavy 1949 case load 
and its "terrific" drain on the ...Rat- 
ional Foundation's epidemic aid 

fund, the need "actually surpasses j ^"^ Vovtagtor'TneTubl 
tne quota. is invited 

Kentucky and the nation has just 
witnessed the worst year in the his- 
tory of the disease the director said. 
He pointed t othe large number of 
"carry over" iron lung cases as an 
example of the need for increased 
funds. "Since the Kentucky Chap- 
ter was founded in 1940, there has 
been only two iron lung cases that 
were carried over from one year to 
the next. But in 1950' the Chapter 
will be caring for 15 cases." 

His words were echoed by Gabe 
Taylor, State March of Dimes chair- 
man. "We are counting on the peo- 
ple of Kentucky as never before," he 
said, "to give lis the necessary funds 
to carry on the fight against this 
dread disease. If all our people 
knew the rapidly mounting costs of 
fighting polio I'm sure they'd open 
their pocketbooks as well as their 
hearts," Mr. Taylor said. 



Keck Announces 
Highway Projicts 



Highway Commissioner John A. 
Keck today called for contractors' 
bids on 32 road improvement pro- 
jects including 85 miles of state 
projects, 28 miles of rural highway 
projects and one federal -aid job ex- 
tending three-tenths of a mile. Bids 
will ibe opened in Frankfort, Janu- 
ary 27th. 

Surfacing and resurfacing will be 
done on the following ocal state 
roads: 

Boone County— Florence-Warsaw 
road from junction of US 25 and 42 
in OPlorence to city limits, 0.2 mile; 
Florence-Warsaw road from city 
limits of Florence to" Gallatin coun- 
ty line, 10.2 miles; Lexington-Cin- 
cinnati road from US 42 near north- 
east city limits of Florence to US 42 
near southwest city limits of Flor- 
ence, 0.5 mile. 

Gallatin County — Warsaw- Flor- 
enove road from city limits of War- 
saw to Boone county line, 5.2 miles; 
Warsaw-Carrollton road from city 
limits of Warsaw to Carroll county 
line, 1.1 miles. 

Reconstruction and traffio bound 
surface — Boone County; North Bend 
road from KY 20 at Hebron to KY 298 
south of Taylorsport, 5.4 miles, and 
Hopeful Toad from KY 18 west of 
Florence to US 42, 2.1 miles. 



Farm Bureau Opens Office* 

The Boone County Farm Bureau 
has rented the two-room building 
in Burlington, owned by Albert 
Kirkpatrick and Mrs. Georgia Wal- 
ton, fronting on Ky. 18, and adjoin- 
ing the Burlington Grill. The in- 
terior of the building has been re- 
conditioned and prepared for use by 
the Farm Bureau personnel and its 
directors, according to John E. Crig- 
ler, secretary and insurance agent. 
Mr. Crigler or his assistant will be 
at the office, according to present 
plans, on Monday, Wednesday and 
Friday of each week, and by ap- 
point other days. 

Entertain With Dinner 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hodges of near 
Beaver Lick entertained at dinner 
December 28th, the folowing guests: 
Goebel Black and son Tracy of 
Farmington, Mich., Howard Clem- 
ents of Lafayette, Ind., Mr. and Mrs. 
Harmon Tanner and sons and Billy 
Tanner of Washington, D. C, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Black and family and Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Black and family. 
All left at a late hour wishing Uncle 
Ben and Aunt Nora a Happy New 
Year. 



Wa-Na Club Meets 
Monday Evening 
In McElroy Home 



The Wa-Na Club, of Walton and 
Verona community, met Monday 
evening, January 9th in' the home of 
Mrs. Gayle McElroy, with Mrs. Al- 
bert Hunt as co-hostess. 

Miss Lillian Davis, president, was 
in charge of the business, which 
consisted of reports from various 
committees. 

Mrs. Clayton Jones reported she 
had sent our adopted friend, Miss 
Mary Sleet, in St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
Covington, a Christmas package. 
Each member drew a month in 
which they are to be personally re- 
sponsible for sending Miss Sleet 
cards and special gifts, throughout 
the year. A Christmas package was 
also sent to Mrs. Ollie Williams in 
Verona. A package of clothing was 
sent to Burlington to the Black sis- 
ters, residing in the County home. 

The program committee announc- 
ed the February meeting is to be a 
theatre party at the Cox Theatre. 

Miss Davis asked for a call meet- 
ing January 30th in order to give a 
skit of the History of "Penny Art 
Fund. Mrs. Clayton Jones extended 
an invitation to come to her home. 

The program was one of Citizen- 
ship, ably presented by Mrs. Fred 
Hamilton, her subject, "Marriage 
Counseling." Mrs. "Clayton Jones, 
"Sex Education In Schools." Mrs. 
Matthew Flynn reviewed Edna Fer- 
ber's short story, "That's Marriage." 
Spiritual guidance was given by Mrs. 
Leo Flynn, reading "Look to This 
Day," from the Sanskirt. — Thomas 
Moore's four lines "on taking a wife" 
and also an anonymous article "to 
Husband and Wife." 

A delightful salad course was 
served to the following members: 
Miss Lillian Davis, Mrs. Leo Flynn, 
Mrs. Matthew Flynn, Mrs. Fred Ham- 
ilton, Mrs.„01ayton Jones," Mrs. Clay- 
ton Renaker, Mrs, Charles Hayes, 
Mrs. Geo. W. Houston, Mrs. T. P. 
Strittmatter, Mrs. Albert Hunt, and 
Mrs. Gayie McElroy. Two new mem- 
bers were added to the membership, 
Mrs. J. B. Johnson and Mrs. Irwin 
Gaines. Mrs. Chester Armstrong was 
a welcome guest. — Pub. Ohm. 



The Walton Fire Department ans- 
wered 19 calls during 1949, with a 
total damage estimated' at $385.00. 
Of these 19 calls, 10 were automo- 
bile fires caused by short circuits in 
the wiring land careless smoking. 
The Department urges every motor- 
ist to check the wiring on his car for 
loose connections' and worn insula- 
tion, which may cause a fire. The 
remaining calls were burning trash 
and grass fires caused from various 
sources. 

The Department has grown very 
efficient in the past few years, with 
the purchase of new and better 
equipment for the protection of Wal- 
ton and vicinity. To list a few of 
these purchases, made possible thru 
the financial support of the people 
of the community: Rain coats, hel- 
ments and boots; additional fire 
hose; foam and foam nozzle for 
large petroleum fires; collapsible 
stretcher; Scott fresh air mask; a 
three-hundred-gallon-a-minute port- 
able pump for rural fires, and the 
latest in chemical extinguishers, a 
15-pound dry powder fire exting- 
uisher. 

Last summer firemen attended a 
three- day Kentucky Fire School at 
Lexington to learn new techniques 
of fire fighting. An instructor from 
the State Vocational Training School 
spent a week in Walton showing the 
department and individual members 
ways of improving their work as 
volunteer firemen. The Fire Depart- 
ment is a competant organization, so 
let's remember the statement that 
has been made many times — "When 
you have a fire, call the fire depart- 
ment first." It's those little fires 
that so many try to extinguish by 
themselves that get out of hand and 
do real damage. The fire depart- 
ment is for your protection and con- 
venience and if there is any little 
service you wish, just contact any 
member of the department. 

On Wednesday night, January 4, 
the Department elected officers for 
the new year, and James R. Allen 
was named chief for the fifth con- 
secutive year; Russell Groger, Dep- 
uty Chief; Guy Carlisle, First As- 
sistant Chief; Paul Simpson, Second 
Assistant Chief; Jack Rouse, Engine 
Captain; Cecil Osborn, Hose Cap- 
tain; Morgan Campbell, Hose Lieu- 
tenant; Charles Holder, Ladder Cap- 
tain, and Jesse W. Thornton, Ladder 
Lieutenant. 



LEGION! 

POST 

l M:u)s Mrres\ 



Don't forget the square dance to- 
morrow night, Friday, Jan. 13 at the 
Legion hall. Music by Freddie 
Fields and the Foolish Fellers. Stop 
in and dance awhile. Music starts 
at 9 p. m. 



How is your memory? Is it fair- 
ly long, or all too short? See if you 
can remember this past summer. 
Try to recall the number of times 
you read in your paper of some un- 
fortunate child or adult who was 
stricken with polio. Try to recall 
the fear, the anxiety you felt "when 
you realized how near to your own 
home polio had struck at its latest 
victim. 

Remember what you said and 
thought then? Sure, you were like 
everyone else, you said, "Why can't 
our doceors find a cure Why cant 
our medical men develop something 
to wipe th}s dread disease from the 
face of the earth?" 

They will, you can bank on that. 
When and how soon depends a lot 
on us. It takes money for research 
work — lots of money. The more 
money, the more research work, and 
the sooner the cure. 

The American Legion will sponsor 
its annual dance for the benefit of 
the polio fund on Saturday, Jan. 28. 
Let your heart, determine your ad- 
mission price— fifty cents or fifty 
dollars— it will all go to the polio 
fund. 

Let's help fight this dread disease, 
this orippler of children, this har- 
binger of death. Do your part this 
winter and hope that next summer, 
polio will be oh its way out— Pub. 
Chr. 



The Smithfield 4-H club in Henry 
county bought two sewing machines 
from funds made at their commun- 
ity fair. 



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Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 12, 1950 



• 


WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 




Entered as Second Class Matter 

January 1, 1916 at the Post 

Office at Walton, Ky. 


k, 


Mark M. Meadows 
Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 




SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

$1.50 PER YEAR 
(In Advance) 



I 



VERONA 



L 




Pat Sturdivent, who mas in the 
hospital, has returned to his home 
and is slowly improving. 

On Sunday, Jan. 1, Mr. and Mrs. 
(Robert Porter and family 'entertain- 
ed with a family dinner for his fa- 
ther, Earnest Porter. Guests were: 
Mr. and Mrs. Marion Waller and 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Jones of Critten- 
den; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Waliler of 
Lexington, and Mr. and (Mrs. W. E. 
Waller. 

Fearnot Blackburn, who has just 
returned from the Philippines, was 
a guest of the Porters in the after- 
noon. 

Jessie Lunsford, who spent the 
holidays with her family, returned 



[ 



INDEPENDENCE 



MEMBER 



KENTUCKY PRES! 
/^A SSOGIATION , 

' ' OKCMI'.l a JAKVAMt. III! 



NOTICE — 

One 1939 Lincoln 4-door will be 
sold at auction at B-M Sales & Ser- 
vice, Walton, Ky., January 18, 1950, 
at 10:00 a. m. To. settle account for 
labor material and storage. 2t-l 

Mrs. Frank Brumfield of Pendle- 
ton county raised 1,200 choice-qual- 
ity broad -breasted bronze turkeys 
this year, selling many at a premium 
price. 



Mrs. Lizzie Noel, who was in the 
hospital Dec. 20>-23, is improving 
slowly at her home. 

The Light Bearers Sunday school 

party at the home of Mrs. J. T. Roto- 

ierts'on Dec. 20 was well attended, 

in spite of the bad weather, and 

everyone reported an enjoyable time. 

( The class was especially glad to 

I welcome our pastor's wife and our 

teacher. So glad her husband was 

well enough to make it possible for 

her to attend. 

Mrs. W. E. Waller and sons joined to Hazelwood last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Laran and dau- i 

ghters in a watch party New Year's 
eve. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Roberts enter- 
tained their family Christmas day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mayro Hayden and 
daughter spent Sunday with his sis- 
ter. 

(Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Waller and 
sons joined the usual family gath- 
ering at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Vest and family. Mr. Vest's 
health is about as usual at this time. 

Wilbur Harris and family of 
i Tennessee were here for a family 
'reunion, and his mother returned 
home with them. 

Miss Nola Rose Yates spent her 
Christmas vacation with her grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chap- 
man. 

David King, Ralph Adams" and 
Billy Mac Waller joined their par- 
ents for the 'holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Waller and sons 
were entertained by Mr. and Mrs. 
C. M. Waller at Crittenden one eve- 
ning during the holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chapman 
spent Christmas day with their dau- 
ghter and family, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd 
Yates at daughter of Walton. 



MONEY? 



SEE 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave.. Cov. 

Phone HEmlock ^458 



Uncle George Rector has been in 
with a cold for about three weeks, 
but will soon be out, It is thought. 

Mrs. Nan Bagby has been very sick 
recently, but is a little better now. . 

Richard McKinley, after an oper- 
ation on his heel, is back from the 
hospital and on crutches. 

Mrs. Carrie Armstrong has not 
be en very well. «• 

The Riley and Stephens groceries 
are now closing on Sundays. Gor- 
don Riley said that he and Howard 
Stephens both readily agreed it 
would be a good thing to do and that 
so far all thecustomers who had 
spoken about it seemed. to think it 
the proper thing to do. 

The Oak Ridge Baptist Church 
baptised in the Independence Bap- 
tist baptistry last Sunday aifternoon 
and the Independence church bap- 
tised also at the close of the Sunday 
night service. 

Thomas Cain, the financial secre- 
tary, reports that the Independence 
Baptist Church raised a little better 
than $7,555.00 last year and fifty- 
five additions were reported. 

Clayton Hemingway, former .resi- 
dent of Independence, now of La- 
tonaa, is reported to be in very poor 
health. 

NOTICE — 

One 1940 Plymouth 2-door will be 
sold at auction at B-M Sales & Ser- 
vice, Walton, Ky., January 18, 1950 
I at 10:00 a. m. Due for labor, mater- 
ial and repossession on car. . 2t-l 

Wall presses for tobacco were us- 
ed by a number of growers in Bullitt 
county for the first time in 1949. 



Absolute 



AUCTION 



COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY 

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS 

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Department of Highways at its of- 
fice, Frankfort, Kentucky, until 10:00 
A. M., Central Standard Time, dpi the 
27th day of January, 1950, at which 
time bids will be publicly .opened 
and read for the improvement of: 
SP GROUP 14A (1950) * 

♦'Mileage shown in these groups 
indicates approximate distance to be 
surfaced and not necessarily the dis- 
tance between beginnings and end 
points shown in descriptiens. 

Boone County, SP 8-90— The Flor- 
ence-Warsaw Road from Jet. 25 and 
42 in Florence to S. W. C. L. of Flor- 
ence, 0.280 miles. Class I Mix, 190 
tons. 

Boone County, SP 8-90— The Flor- 
ence-Warsaw Road from S. W. C. L. 
of Florence to Galatin County Line, 
10.278 miles. Class I Mix, 11,920 tons. 

Gallatin County, SP 39-13 — The 
Warsaw- Florence Road from E. C. L. 
of Warsaw to Boone County Line, 
5.298 miles. Class I Mix, 6730 tons. 

Boone County, SP 8-10— The Lex- 
ington-Cincinnati Road from US 42 
near N. E. C. L. of Florence to US 42 
near S. W. C. L. of Florence, 0.510 
miles. Class I Mix, 345 tons. 

Gallatin County, SP 39-93— The 
Warsaw-Carrollton Road from E. C. 
L. of Ghent to Gallatin County Line, 
0.996 mile. Class I Mix, 765 tons. 

Boone County, RS 8-150-^The North 
Bend Road from KY 20 at Hebron to 
KY 298, 3% miles south of Taylors- 
port, 5.441 miles. Reconstruction 
and traffic bound surface. 

Boone County, iRS 8-390 — The 
Hopeful Road from KY 18, approx- 
imately 1-mile west of Florence, 
southerly to US 42, 2.16 miles. Re- 
construction and traffic bound sur- 
face. 

The attention of».prospective bid- 
ders is called to the prequalifica- 
tion requirements, and necessity for 
securing certificate of eligibility, the 
special provisions covering sublett- 
ing or assigning the contract and 
the Department's regulation which 
prohibits the issuance of proposals 
after 4:30 P. M. on .the day preceding 
the opening of bids. 

NOTE: A purchase charge of $10 
will be made for each proposal. Re- 
mittance must accompany requests 
for the proposal forms. Refunds will 
not be made for any reason. 

Further information, bidding pro- 
posals, et etera, will be furnished 
upon application to the Frankfort 
Office. The right is reserved to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS 
Frankfort, Kentucky 
January 5, 1950. 2t-2 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

January White 

SALE 

Entire Stock 

Of Seasonable Merchandise «..:.-.. 

Greatly Reduced! 

I Table Slightly Soiled and Mussed 1 
Merchandise at .' * Price 

AS ALWAYS 



GUARANTEED QUALITY 



For Food, Fun 
and Recreation 

Visit ... Ye Olde 

Friendly Frogstool Inn 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

NEW TELEVISION 

Food ■ Beer - Pool 

Modem Rest Rooms 
Serving the Public Over 20 Years I 
H. B. Hubbard, Prop. 



*<. 



2:30 P.M. 

To settle the estate of the late F. C. Cook, the heirs have signed a contract with 
Rel C. Wayman & Sons and B. H. Blair (agent in Grant County), to sell at absolute 
auction, the 9-room house with city water, electric and a large lot. The house is ar- 
ranged for three families and is located in DRY RIDGE, KY., on North Main St., 
and faces the Dixie Highway. This is good investment property. 

Terms Announced Day of Sale 

ENTERTAINMENT by Frank Miller and the Kentucky Fiddlers. Listen to WZIP, 
Covington, 1050 on your dial, each Saturday from 12:15 to 12:30 p.'m. 

REMEMBER! If you want to buy or sell privately or at auction, see or call 

Rel C. Wayman & Sons 

623 Washington St., Covington, Ky. Phones: HE 5107; Ind. 5064; JU 4895 

B. H. Blair, Grant Co. Agent 



i DIAMOND 
! VALUE . . . 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and 
admiration. 

Come to Match's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced in strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
ence in this one loca- 
tion' is your assurance 
of getting dollar for 
dollar value, in your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 
Monthly Payments I 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON. KENTUCKY 



You get more quality for your money when 
you buy "STAR BRAND." "POLL PARROTT" 
and "ENDICOTT JOHNSON" shoes. We sell 
better shoes at lower prices. Compare the 
quality and price of our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. P. F. Gym Shoes. 

—WE FIT BY X-RAY— 




Morris Depf . Store 

"The House of Quality" — Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER -:- KENTUCKY 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



I 
I 



Maytag! $29.95 

For Your Old Washer; No Down Payment; 1 Yr. to Pay 

Of course you can 





I 



I 



Now— a genuine Maytag at these easy-on-the-budget prices! 
Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
faction with the rugged, dependable Maytag! 

Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
onstration. 





THE MAYTAG CHIEFTAIN. A gen- 
uine Maytag, yet priced within ■ 
few dollars of the lowest- # __ _ * 
coat washers on the $19^95 
market. iA~W— 



THE MAYTAG COMMANDER 
Big, square porcelain tub. Gyra- 
foam action waahea M _ _ _ 
extra faat, extra + |44— 



HAGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 71 13 




I 



New Model DODGE Truck 

Yz Ton Pickup, with the new steering wheel shift, 

now delivered at your door for $1,390.00. 

Other Models off— ^ } ^,.1,1 % 2, 2%, 3 Ton 

Priced Accordingly 

Now On Display at Your . . . 

DODGE-PLYMOUTH & DODGE TRUCK DEALER 

COVINGTON AUTO SALES, Inc. 

HE 1722 24 EAST 5th STREET HE 1723 

Between Scott and Madison 
Dodge & Plymouth Carl - Dodge Job-Rated Trucks 



I 



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Thursday, January 12, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Three 




WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 
Bryan Rector, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Fred S. Nichols, Pastor 
Frank Penlck, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m, 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship 6:45 p. m, 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m, 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m, 



ST. PATRICK CHURCH VERONA 

Rev. Henry A. Buseimeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month 8:30 a. m, 

2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m 

3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m 

4th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m 
5th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 
i J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday School ,— 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service __ 1 11:00 a. m, 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m, 

GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a,.m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(First and Third Sundays) 





uTLnnu : 

WF International 'uniform H 
miP l Sunday 'Scho.,1 Ugon. P H 



By 08, KENNETH J, FOREMftH 



SCRIPTURE: Acts 2:42—5:42. 
DEVOTIONAL READING: Hebrews IV. 
23-26, 32-34. 



Fellowship 



Lesson for January 15, 1950 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. — 7:30 p. m. 



ALL SAINTS MISSION, WALTON 
Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. rn. 

2nd Sunday of month — 8:30 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month __ _ 8:30 a. m. 

5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 



KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m, 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. ___ 8:00 p. m. 
Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m 

— Services Every Sunday— 



INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. rh, 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a; m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Don Smith, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. in. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7f30 p. m, 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 
Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m 



NEW BETHEL BAPTIST, VERONA 

Rev. R. F. DeMoisey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

—Services Every Sunday — 



WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Grover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMilllan, Supt. 

Sunday School — 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship __'____ 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. m. 




LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 



BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 



NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship , 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U , 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 



CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor. 

Walter Kidwell, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 



CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt— HaTvey Hughes 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School - — 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Services 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. — 7:30 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 

1038 Madison Ave., Covington. Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 

Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Ray 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



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SAVINGS and 
LOAN ASSN. 



•THE FIRST CHRISTIANS didn't 
■ have everything we have, but 
on the other hand they had one 
thing seldom to be seen nowadays. 
They did not have the New Testa- 
ment, only the Old; they were not 
surrounded by an even partly Chris- 
ti a n civilization; 
they had no cen- 
turies of Christian 
tradition; they had 
no world-wide 
Christianity, only 
a small knot of 
people in one 
small and out-of- 
the-way city, Jerus- 
alem. On the other 
hand, for all they Dr. Foreman 
lacked, they had one great thing: 
Fellowship. We have it too, but too 
often in a week and watery fash- 
ion as compared with what they 

enjoyed. 

• . • 

Family Living 

THE VERY FIRST Christians 
lived literally like a big family. 
This is all the more extraordinary 
when you think of the variety of 
their backgrounds. (Look up the 
list o* places mentioned in Acta 
2:9,10 on a map of Asia, Africa 
and Europe.) A good family is a" 
unit. 

If little Willie comes down 
with appendicitis, his parents 
don't get out the family ac- 
count book and figure out how 
much Willie has been worth 
to the family, in dollars and 
cents, in his eight years of life. 
Suppose they calculated that his 
services, such as they are — carry- 
ing in the wood, feeding the chick- 
ens, or what not— had been worth 
about $23.75 since the last time he 
was sick, they wouldn't send little 
Willie to the hospital with the note 
to the doctor: "Please give- our 
Willie $23.75 worth of operation.- 
That's all he has put into the family 
budget and that's all we're going 
to let him take out!" 

Not by any means. Little Willie 
is taken to the hospital and what- 
ever operation he needs, that is 
the one his parents want him to 
have, even if it costs 20 times what 
Willie has been worth in cash. The 
family give Willie what he needs, 
and they also expect him to help 
out in all the ways he can. 
* » • 

Church Living 

ONE TROUBLE with our 
churches today is that so many 
of them have actually lost this fam- 
ily-feeling. The early Christians, 
we are told, "Were of one heart 
and soul." Could you say of your 
church that all its members are 
of one heart and soul? 

The early Christians, feeling thus 
close to one another, "had all 
things in common." What do the 
members of your church have in 
common? They meet in one place 
once a week. But what else? Do 
they even speak to one another? 
If one member of the congregation 
falls sick, do the others find out 
about it quickly, and when they find 
out, what do they do about it? If 
trouble comes to a member, do 
the other members rally around 
him? 

Does the church say to Its 
members, as the Salvation 
Army does of hard-pressed 
men, "You may be down but 
you're never out?" Some 
churches have a pastor's or 
deacon's fund, to be nsed in 
cases of need. 

Contributors to the fund are as 
anonymous as are those who are 
helped by it. The idea is for those 
who are blessed with large income, 
or those who may have special 
windfalls, bonuses, extra dividends, 
big crops, and so on, to chip in 
for the aid of all who may run into 
trouble. 

• • • 

Not All Troubles Are Financial 

NATURALLY, not all troubles 
are financial. Some of the most 
serious troubles have little or noth- 
ing to do with money. There are 
many other kinds of needs. For 
example, in any church there will 
be lonely people, and you can't cure 
loneliness with a check, no matter 
how big. 

The minister Is the key man, 
he can locate the needs, but he 
can't supply them all. Lonely 
people, those who have been 
through deep sorrow, men try- 
ing to find the right Jobs, young 
folks in danger of serious 
temptation — a church which 
is like a family will not let 
these people fight their battles 
alone. « - , 



Thirty -six 4-H club" hoys in John 
son county are raising chickens this 
year, most of them starting flocks of 
100 chicks. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. 

Worship : 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-Bible Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 



STAFFORDSBURG CHURCH 
Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. . 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m. 



WBION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

** Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 
Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 10:30 a. m. 



WALTON, KY. 
Phone— 352 

FLORENCE, KY. 
Phone— 193 

Chambers & Grubbs 

FUNERAL HOMES 



WE APPRECIATE . . . 

When a family calls us in 
time of need, we feel deeply 
hbnored, for we believe that 
no public servant, and prop- 
erly so, is selected with as 
much care as ^he funeral 
director. We appreciate the 
confidence so often placed 
in us. 



THE BEST PLACE 

EAT 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 




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Establish the habit- of regular 
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Personal and Business Loans I 

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WALTON, KY. 



DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 



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You ought to put into real action that long- 
felt desire to do something that will help others. 

\ » We all have that desire— all but the very 
selfish. We would like to serve. But where? 
How? 

One of the contributions which our churches 
make to the life of this community is in provid- 
ing countless opportunities for valuable service. 

Can you sing in a choir? Teach a class? Lead 
a youth group? Visit a shut-in? Pack a gift 
basket? Paint a Sunday School room? Mend a 
choir gown? 

These are humble, yet valuable services. They 
won't make you famous, but they'll make you a 
better person. And they'll help others discover 
the true riches in life. 

You ought to do it! You ought to join a church 
. . . and find the service that you can tender! 



1HE CHUBCH FOH All . . 
AU. FOB THE CHOHCH 

tot on earth for the butldtaa of 

F« .1 com ? unl,y and nation, m 
*2 *• «<*• of th. Church itMll 

MM **** hU ttoral and iS-' 
♦•rial aupport. Plan to ao to 

*»»*>* Matthew 

Tueid.y Isaiah 
WadneuTyI.uk* 
Thunday Ilalacbl 
Friday Luke 
Saturday Matthew 



as 40-m 

« 7-10 

• 46-49 

J M0 

4 16-21 



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CopyrlgM 1950, E. E. Kill 



ier. Str«aburg t 



Linton's Barber Shop 

Walton, Kentucky 

Florence Deposit Bank 
Florence, Kentucky 

Walton Lumber Co. 
Phone Walton 19 

Hamilton and Jones 

Walton. Kentucky 



•> 



Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence. Kentucky 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 
Phone Walton 95 



Conrad Hardware 
For Service, Large or Small. See Powers 

Dixie State Bank 

Walton, Kentucky 

Meador's Grocery 
Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables. Meats 

Walton & Readnour 
Coal - Feed • Seed Phone Walton 154 

, ! ^_ 

Roberts Grocery 

Where Tou Get Quality and Price 

Community Public Service Co., Inc. 

Walton, Kentucky 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



NOTED EDITOR 
TO SPEAK AT UK 

Bernard DeVoto, editor of "The 
Easy Chair" ,in Harper's Magazine 
and winner of the 1948 Pulitzer Prize 
for History, will visit the University 
of Kentucky, January 19 for two pub- 
lic lectures. One of the nation's best 
known author- leoturers, Mr. DeVoto 
comes to UK as the guest of the De- 



partment of English and appears as 
one of the heatfliners on the Depart- 
ment's annual literary • dramatic 
series. He is a former editor of the 
Saturday Review of Literature and 
has taught at Northwestern and 
Harvard Universities. 

— I* ..Tour Subscription Paid— 



Public Sale 

^ 

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PINER, KY.— ON LLL HIGHWAY 

SAT., JAN. 14 

Beginning at 1:00 P.M. ' 

10-ft. refrigerator, electric cook stove, washing ma- 
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4 chairs; 5 table lamps; 5-piece living room suite; 5- 
piece bed room suite; large heating stove; clocks; radio; 
2 rugs; electric coffeemaker; silverware; dishes; cook- 
ing utensils; chicken brooder; lawn mower; lot of jelly, 
tomatoes, peaches and all kinds of other canned fruit; 
50 chickens; 3 rocking-chairs; some garden tools; 1941 
G. M. C. stock truck; Holstein cow, 4 years old, and 
other items too numerous to mention. 

— TERMS CASH 



Hilton Steinh 



auser 

Sale Conducted By 

Harry F. Johnson 

Real Estate & Auction Co.— Phone Ind. 6196 



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Great 
Man 



By Richard Hill Wilkinson 

TF PROFESSOR AARON CHES- 
■ wick was famous he was not 
aware of this fact. He was too busy 
wttth his experiments in the field o\ 
chemistry, with teaching the under- 
graduates of Mapleridge College 
^_________^ the rudiments of 

I elementary 

I O • Minute science, with 

\0 Fiction wr i ting K p t per »f 

I and books ft 

which he set 
forth (in an almost apologetic style) 
the results of his experiments, and 
with reading avidly the works of 
such great scientists as Mons. Oli- 
ver Davillier and Senor Alfredo Val- 
le Indan, both of whom had long ago 
won his respect and admiration. 

He was an unpretentious looking 
little man, this Professor Cheswick, 
with pale blue eyes and horn- 
rimmed glasses and a pasty com- 
plexion. He wasn't one to attract 
attention or to assert himself. He 
went about with a perpetual far- 
away look in his^eyes. 

There came a time when a prob- 
lem presented itself that challenged 
his skill and knowledge. He labored 
over it for days. They days became 




He was an unpretentious look- 
ing man, this Professor Ches- 
wick. 

weeks and the weeks months. At 
last, worn and haggard, the little 
man was ready to admit defeat. 

Time after time he returned 
to it, only to find himself de- 
feated. He visited every library 
within miles, read every book 
by Davilliar and Indan, as well 
as other great scientists that 
was available, but without find- 
ing the answer. 

In the end Professor Cheswick 
had an idea. It was summer. He 
needed, a vacation. Why not take 
a month off, visit Europe and per- 
haps call on Davillier and Indan 
and ask them personally to clear up 
the matter that so burdened his 
mind? 

A week later Professor Cheswick 
sailed for France. The little school 
teacher was a lonely figure. He 
struck up a few acquaintances. He 
wasn't the type to attract people. 
But he enjoyed the trip. This was 
something he had never done be- 
fore, i — 

He wag glad when the boat 
docked. Eagerly he looked ahead to 
his meeting with Mons. Davillier. 

But alas! The next day Professor 
Cheswick learned that Mons. Davil- 
lier had gone to America for his 
summer holiday and was not ex- 
pected to return for another month. 

The little scientist was depressed 
and disappointed. His time was 
short. Madrid, where lived Senor 
Indan was a long way off. Yet it 
could be reached, he thought sud- 
denly and excitedly, by plane in a 
very short while. 

1JE WAS DELIGHTED to learn 
"that Senor Indarr was in Madrid. 
Yes, it was difficult to obtain an 
interview with the great man. He 
was constantly being pressed for in- 
terviews. What was it the American 
wanted to see him about? A prob- 
lem? Ah, yes, Senor Indan was re- 
quested to solve so many problems. 
It was very, very doubtful if he 
would grant an interview for such 
a slight matter. However, if the 
American would care to take his 
chances, Senor Indan was to appear 
at a reception on Tuesday night. 
Possibly there would be an oppor- 
tunity to ask his question ... 

Professor Cheswick attended the 
reception. He stood in. line for 
hours, a quiet, unassuming, unim- 
portant looking little man, waiting 
for his chance to speak to the 
great Senor Indan. It came at last. 
At last the Mapleridge school 
teacher and scientist stood before 
the man he respeoted more than 
anyone else in the world. 



Thursday, January 12, 1950 



He was so overcome by awe 
that for a moment he just 
stared. Senor Indan frowned 
Impatiently and Professor Ches- 
wick found his voice. He stated 
hfs question. The Senor's brows 
arched in surprise. 

"An unusual question, Senor," 
he said. "Frankly, I cannot answer 
It. There is only one man in the 
world with enough knowledge and 
learning to find the answer. He is 
one of your own countrymen. My 
good friend Mons. Davillier is at 
this moment in America seeking an 
interview with this wizard whom 
the whole scientific world respects 
and admires, yet who is so ab- 
sorbed in his work that it is diffi- 
cult to persuade him to appear in 
public. I refer to Professor Aaron 
Cheswick of Maolerid^e college." 
Released by Wv'ti r»-> 'tires 



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Thursday, January 12, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 




KENTUCKY 
.nWASHINGW^ 




Each day the House and Senate 
are in session, Divine Guidance is 
asked before lawmakers get down 
to work. 

On the day President Truman ad- 
dressed the joint session, Dr. Edward 
G. Latch, pastor of the National 
Methodist Church, said the prayer, 
We .believe all people — in and out of 
Congress— could well heed these 
words: 

'Save us from unworthy dis- 
cords, keep us from perpetual 
motion, restrain our unruly de- 
sires. Make us worthy of high 
positions we hold, give direction 
to our desires, develop within us 
understanding minds and loving 
hearts that the influence of our 
lives may always be for Thy 
good. Grant us wisdom, grant 
us courage that we may not fail 
Thee." 

Moving Time;. 

This is the time of the year when 
Congressmen and Senators change 
offices. Painters, carpenters and 




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electricians are busy as lawmakems 
move to better quarters. 
- Senator Withers, the junior sen- 
ator from the Blue Grass, is one of 
those who has obtained a new of- 
fice. It's on the third floor of the 
Senate Office Building, not far from 
the headquarters of the senior sen- 
ator, Virgil Chapman. 

The Withers's office now overlooks 
the north plaza of the capital with 
a beautiful view of the Supreme 
Court Building and (the dome of the 
Capitol itself. 
The Spotlight: 

The new Mrs. Barkley has taken 
the spotlight away from the other 
ladies of the Congress. 

Take the day the Senate opened. 
Mrs. Barkley was the center, of all 
eyes as she took her seat in the gal- 
lery. Her distinguished husband 
was almost forgotten until he bang- 
ed down the gavel and called the 
Senate to order. 

Mrs. Barkley was accompanied to 
the first session by her step-daugh- 
ters — Mrs. Max Truitt and Mrs. 
Douglas McArthur HI. It looks like 
a happy family. 
Back Home: 

We had an enjoyable visit to 
Northern Kentucky recently to pre- 
sent a gavel to the Christopher Gist 
Historical Society. The gavel was 
made from wood obtained at the 
Maryland farm of General Covington 
for whom Covington was named. 

During the visit we had occasion 
to drive through Warsaw and La- 
Grange late one night, too late to 
stop and see friends. But the quiet 
and charm of those two Kentucky 
communities reminded us of the 
English countryside. We were dis- 
appointed at. not being able to take 
time out and spend several days a- 
way from the rush of Washington. 
Do You Know: 

While visiting the Fifth District 
we heard many complimentary 
things about Boone County's Judge 



HENRY'S BOOTERY 

SHOES ... For the Entire Farnily . . . SHOES 

Next to Kroger Super Market - Erlanger, Ky. 

SHOP HERE & SAVE 

RED GOOSE SHOES RUBBER FOOTWEAR 

MEN'S GOOD WORK SHOES 

SPECIAL! Rayon Stockings ........ 35c pr., 3 for $1.00 



BABY FARM— Dirt for Dough 

Boone County, near Verona, on the new highway; 57 acres of rich 
tobacco land, 1948 crop was 63-cent, 1949 crop 57-cent; this is a 
real producer and a money-maker; has nice 5-room modern 
home, as in any city; large tobacco barn, racked for tobacco; 
stripping room, up-to-date chicken house, corn crib full of corn; 
fenced and cross fenced; 2 ponds, cistern at house, creek in 
pasture; lots of nice shade trees in yard; $15,000 is the price of 
farm alone; see owner. Walter Merrill, Verona State Road, or 
exclusive agent— 

REL C. WAYMAN & SONS * 

623 Washington St., Covington, Ky HE 5107; Ind. 5064 




SELL YOUR TOBACCO WITH THE . . . NEW 

KENTUCKIANA 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

Carrollton, Ky. 

The Modern House with Uniform Light! 




As host of "Confidential Close- 
ups," George Fisher greets Holly- 
wood personalities every Saturday 
on WLW-NBC at 5:45 DJm. EST. 



Carroll Cropper . . . We were im- 
pressed, itoo, with the widespread 
popularity of John Drahiman, clerk 
of the Campbell Circuit Court . . . 
Congressman Spence had bad luck 
almost as soon as he returned to the 
capital. Robbers broke into his Ft. 
Thomas home . . . And a recent vis- 
itor in Washington was Major James 
B. Davis of Park Bills, just back from 
Alaska, and Lt. Col. Jack E. Wert, 
formerly of Ft. Mitchell. 

Ryland Homemakers 

A message for the New Year was 
given by Mrs. J. A. Rich at the Jan- 
uary meeting of the Ryland Home- 
makers Club which convened at the 
home otf Mrs. William Damon, presi- 
dent of the club. 

Mrs. William Dickman opened her 
program with a song, "Bless Be the 
Tie," and Mrs. Shelby Martin read 
a poem entitled, "The Old Year and 
New." The devottonals were given 
by Mrs. W. H. Bagby. 

The lesson on Wood finishes and 
their application was explained by 
Mrs. Shelby Martin and co-worker, 
Mrs. it. B. Frakes. A special work 
shop day will be held later this 
month. 

Now is the time to order flower 
seed for good selection, advised Mrs. 
Bagby, garden leader. A beautiful 
flower garden is one that is care- 
fully planned, she stated. 

A study of foods will be the sup- 
plementary program for February. 
Members will discuss the value of 
vitamins. 

Members responding to roll call 
with, their pet peeve, were Mesdames 
William Dickman, J. H. Frakes, Shel- 
by Martin, J. A. Rich, O. J. Williams, 
F. B. Hermes, W. H. Bagby, R. B. 
Frakes, William Damon, new mem- 
ber, Mrs. W. P. Schwall, and Miss 
Zelma iByerly, home demonstration 
agent. 

Mrs. J. A. (Rich will toe hostess for 
the February meeting.— Pub. Chm. 

John W. Burks of Barren county 
found that a silo filled with a mix- 
ture of corn and cane is a valuable 
aid in lowering costs of milk pro- 
duction. 

Try Our 'WANT ADS" for Results! 



*» 



LITTLE SOUTH FORK 



Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Boots and dau- 
ghter spent the New Year's weekend 
with relatives in Lexington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rea Scudder, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charley Sutton, Mr. and' Mrs. 
Harry Baker and daughters were the 
New Year's day dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mrs., Julius Sutton and daugh- 
ters. 

. The congregation was glad to see 
Rev. Joe Johnson back at church, fol- 
lowing an operation. 

Rev. Joe Johnson, Sally and Bonnie 
Baker were Sunday dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. iRea Scudder. 

Everyone was glad to see a change 
of weather. 

Don't forget Sunday school and 
church next Sunday. 



GLENCOE 



Eagle Creek has been very high 
the past week. ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Snow spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Walter Noel. 

Mrs. Kitty Egleston is home after 
being in the hospital with a broken 
leg. 

Martin Noel has been cpnfined to 
his toed for several days. 

Mrs. C. E. Radford has been to see 
her father in the mountains. 

Mrs. Georgia Noel entertained her 
Bible class members Christmas. 
Fourteen ladies were present. Our 
teacher, Mrs. Pyle, gave a very fine 
reading, "The Birth of Our Lord," 
after which prayer was offered and 
presents were exchanged. All were 
then invited to the dining room 
where refreshments were served. All 
left saying they had a very fine time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Crouch are 
enjoying a nice trip to Florida. 

Word was received from Mr. and 
Mrs. Gilbert Reed, who are in Flor- 
ida, that they are really enjoying 
themselves. 



State No. 73-625 

VERONA BANK 

Report of condition of Verona Bank of Verona in the State of 
Kentucky at the close of business on December 31. 1949. 

ASSETS 
Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash in process of collection __, $ 87, °~xxl 

U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed __ 210,200.00 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions — L ^X'aS 

Other Ibonds, notes, and debentures aJw'/X 

Loans and discounts 143,962.04 

Bank premises owned $700.00, furniture and 

fixtures $100.00 S 000 " 

Other assets : 941.74 

TOTAL ASSETS $444,072.85 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations $262,698.37 

Time deposits of Individuafls, partnerships, and 

corporations 125,492.33 

Deposits of United States Government ^ 

(including postal savings) — 6,469.89 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 1,335.40 

Other deposits (certified and officers' checks, etc.) 750.00 

TOTAL DEPOSITS - $396,745.99 

TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) $396,745.99 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capital • — $ 25,000.00 

Surplus 15,000.00 

Undivided profits 7,326.86 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 47,326.86 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $444,072.85 

* This bank's capital consists of 1,000 shares common stock 
with total par value of $25,000.00. 

MEMORANDA I 

Assets pledged or assigned to secure liabilities 

and for other purposes -^"sgt — $15,000.00 

I, G. C. Ransom, Vice President-Cashier, of the aifove- named 
bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true, and that 
it fully and.correctly represents the true state of the several mat- 
ters herein contained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge 
and belief. 

Correct— Attest: G. C. RANSOM. 

W. B. Ambrose, W. T. Renaker, T. J. Carr, C. E. Baker, Directors. 

State of Kentucky, County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 5th day of January, 
1950, and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of 
this bank. 

BLANCHE C. RANSOM, Notary Public. 
My commission expires November 23, 1950. 



TOBACCO SOLD ON SALE OF JANUARY 4, 1950 

lbs. avg. 

W. Robinson and W. E. Simpson 970 $54.39 

Lisxie Smith and Charles Aldridge 1218 50.13 

Emma Flynn and Matthew Flynn ts —-- 4294 51.36 

M. L. Baker 4894 50.28 

Mary Rich and B. Belew 1694 52.88 

B. Jump and M. R. Cheeseman : 1692 52.93 

E. H. Wolfe and Son _. 2066 5142 

Henry Deck 1924 5257 

Ed Hellmer 1298 55.57 

M. Malone f— 2680 56.00 

C. H. Baker _j — ... — -. 940 55.57 

C H. Baker and Russell Baker 1020 56.87 

Ben Adams 1510 52.12 

Ray Ellis - : —1430 5269 

Lallie Southgate and W. Mahoney 2452 51.30 

Franklin Judy 1440 50.37 

C. Meyers __.,__,^1838 50.85 

James Simpson and Son 3266 50.09 

B. Lillard , _ — 1966 56.33 

Ed Peterson - — ^„926 52.78 

James Perigo : — -.2248 50.80 

William Schrimer and Everett Hatton — — —2130 50.68 

LEONARD COOK GENERAL MANAGER 

OTHA COOK FIELD AGENT 

JOE DUNCAN & DAVE GAINES AUCTIONEERS 

J. F. JUDY FLOOR MANAGER ~ 

PHU. E. STALLARD WEIGHMAN 

HAROLD HEDGER BOOKKEEPER 




At one time or another moet of us be- 
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wrought nerves. This makes us irritable, 
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not do as so many thousands have done 
for over sixty years— try 

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" Miles Nervine is a mild but effective 
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has brought restful nights and peaceful 
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ave it on hand and be 
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nerves threaten to keep 
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iisT 



Set 1.00 




New Plymouth Special DeLuxe Four-Door Sedan 




The Plymouth Special DeLuxe four-door sedan, one of nine new models, is shown above. The car contains 
important styling changes and improvements for safety and comfort. Its high compression engine and many 
mechanical features provide lively, economical performance. 

• •• ^ •«• *••»• 

Plymouth Has New Look 

Both Coming and Going 



The 1950 Plymouth car, with im- 
portant styling changes and improve- 
ments for safety and riding comfort, 
will go on display in dealer show- 
rooms throughout the country Jan- 
uary 12. 

There are new lines in the silhou- 
ette which give the new Plymouth a 
longer, lower, more streamlined ap- 
pearance. The changes are readily 
apparent whether viewed from front, 
rear, or side. 

Rear fenders, which are bolted on 
for economical removal in case re- 
pairs are necessary, have been re- 
styled and lengthened. A larger rear 
window on club coupes and four- 
door sedans, slightly greater over-all 
width, and alterations on the rear 
deck provide a longer, heavier, road- 
hugging appearance for all models. 
The grille has been simplified and 
made more massive. It consists of 
two large horizontal bars with a 
curved-down top member and a 
single vertical bar at the center. 
Above the grihVthe Plymouth name 
plate appears in larger block letters, 
apd a bigger, more colorful medal- 
lion has been placed over the name 
plate. 

Described as "Packed with value 



and ready to prove it," the new 
Plymouth was characterized by D. 
S. Eddins, president of Plymouth, as 
"The greatest car value we have 
ever offered the public." 

"When we speak of value," Eddins 
said, "we mean that we have com- 
bined beauty with sensible styling, 
that we have achieved big-car per- 
formance with small-car economy, 
and that the mechanical excellence 
of which we have always been 
proud has maintained its high level." 

The front and rear tread have 
been increased, a factor which in- 
creases stability, eases tire loading 
stress on curves, and enhances the 
car's general appearance. Thirty-two 
per cent larger than on previous 
models, the new rear window in- 
creases visibility and its lines blend 
into the car's new streamlining 
motif. The window is set in a newly 
designed locking rubber seal. 

There are larger bumpers on both 
front and rear. In addition to pro- 
viding greater protection for the 
grille, rear deck and fenders, the 
bumpers add materially to the gen- 
eral appearance of massiveness. 

The theme of simplicity which has 
been carried out in the medallion 
and name plate on the front has 



been continued in the ornamentation 
of the rear deck. The block-letter 
name plate, the license plate light 
ornament, the license plate recess, 
and the T-shaped luggage compart- 
ment handle are styled to accent the 
car's low, sleek lines. Combination 
tail lights and stop lights are set 
into each rear fender. 

The redesigned instrument panel 
provides new backgrounds of trans- 
parent gunmetal on spun aluminum 
for the gauge dials, speedometer, 
radio dial, and clock. The gunmetal 
finish is also used on the radio grille 
screen. There are larger rotary 
switch knobs which are easier to 
operate. 

Features for performance, comfort 
and safety which were previously in- 
troduced in the Plymouth line have 
been retained. The car has charac- 
teristic interior roominess, ample 
head and leg room, and wide, deep 
chair-height seats. The six-cylinder, 
97-horsepower engine has a 7 to 1 
compression ratio. The combination 
ignition and starter switch, auto- 
matic electric* choke, super-cushion 
tires, safe-guard hydraulic brakes 
and safety-rim wheels are among the 
"high-priced car" features contained 
in the new Plymouth. -.j 



"""NERVINE 



NOW ON DISPLAY AT 



WALTON GARAGE 



PHONE 40 



WALTON, KY. 






V s 






Page Six 



JIMMIE NED MASON 

Burial .for Jimmie Ned Mason, 18, 
was held in the Carrollton Cemetery 
upon arrival of the body here from 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. 
Serviced were conducted at Union 
Baptist Church. 

The youth, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Winston Mason of Union, died in the 
hospital Tuesday morning of a rare 
head ailment from which he had 
suffered for six months. Following 
hospitalization in Cincinnati during 
the summer he was taken to Balti- 
more two weeks ago for further 
treatment. 

Young Mason graduated from the 
New Haven high school last May 
and was stricken shrtly after. 

NOTED EDITOR 
TO SPEAK AT UK 

Bernard DeVoto, editor of "The 
Easy Chair" in Harper's Magazine 
and winner of the 1948 Pulitzer Prize 
for. History, will visit the University 
of Kentucky, January 19 for two pub- 
lic lectures. One of the nation's best 
known author- lecturers, Mr. DeVoto 
comes to UK as the guest of the De- 
partment of English and appears as 
one of the headliners on the Depart- 
ment's annual literary - dramatic 
series. He is a former editor of the 
Saturday Review of Literature and 
has taught at Northwestern and 
Harvard Universities. 

— Is Your Subscription Paid — 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 




QUICK RELSEF FROM 

Symptoms of Distress Arising from 

STOMACH ULCERS 

due to EXCESS ACID 

FreeBookTellsofHomeTreatmentthat 
Must Help or it Will Cost You Nothing 

Over three million bottles of the Wi i.l a rd 
Tbiitiiint have been sold for relief of 
•ymptoms of distress arising from Stomach 
and Duodenal Ulcers due to Excess Acid — 
t*oor Digestion, Sour or Upset Stomach, 
Gasslness, Heartburn, Sleeplessness, etc., 
doe to Excess Acid. Sold on IS days' trial I 
Ask for "Wlllard's Message" which fully 
•jiplnlni this treatment — Ires — at ... 

R. C. Brakef ield. Druggist Walton 



WHEN 

NERVOUS TENSION 







By Richard Hill Wilkinson 

"T\KAR TEMPLE: I was indeed 
■** glad to learn that you had ob- 
tained such a satisfactory position. 
I am sure that you wiil make a 
most efficient secretary. Frankly, I 
have been entertaining . some mis- 
givings about your future. Serving 
in the capacity of guardian to mod- 
ern young ladies is, after all, hardly 
in my 'line, although I was only too 
■ glad to look 

3 after the daugh- 

- Minute ter of "my close 
Fiction ' rie " d - T ° m 

Creighton, when 

he so unexpect- 
edly passed away. I imagine you 
are quite a grown up young lady 
now, though it is hard for me to 
visualize you in any other form 
than a girl in pigtails and short 
dresses—" , 

Aaron Bell, 34, looking 10 years 
younger, abruptly ceased dictating 
and stared hard at his stenographer. 
The stenographer, Miss Daniels by 
name, was small, dark, vivacious 
and exceedingly attractive. She had 
come to work in the law office of 
Attorney Aaron Bell two weeks pre- 
vious. She was a capable girl, yet for 
some unexplainable reason Aaron 
hadn't been able to get used to her. 
That is to say, he felt nervous 
whenever he was dictating letters. 

During the next few days 
Aaron began to get an inkling 
ow why it was that he felt un- 
easy when dictating letters .to 
Miss Daniels. He began to won- 
der if heretofore he hadn't been 
attempting to evade an issue. 
He asked himself, secretly, if 
Miss Daniels was becoming to 
mean more to him than just a 
secretary. 

•TWO DAYS LATER Aaron was 
* rudely swept out of the realm 
of ecstasy (a state of mind brought 
about by his dinner date with Miss 
Daniels), by receiving another let- 
ter from his ward. 

"Dear Guardian : My boss is real- 
ly quite lovely, and has been dis- 
playing an unusual amount of in- 
terest in me since my last letter. 




JUL 



Thoa« occaaional night* when ner- 
vous tension keeps yon awake — are 
you more wakeful the harder yon try 
to aleep? Those days when tense 
nerves make you irritable and jumpy 
—ere you crankier and more restless 
when you try to fight the feeling? 

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At any rate, Aaron took Miss 
Daniels in his arms and kissed 
her . . . 

I am not a little flattered by his at- 
tention and very much thrilled. In 
fact, I believe I could fall in- love 
with him very easily." 

Aaron rang for Miss Daniels. 
"Dear Temple: I demand that you 
resign from your present position 
at once. It's silly and absurd to 
think of a girl your age falling in 
love, esspecially with a man who 
makes love to every stenographer 
he employs." 

That night Aaron suggested a 
drive through the country and was 
delighted when Miss Daniels ac- 
cepted. It was a beautiful June eve- 
ning, with a full moon and a cool- 
ing breeze blowing off the ocean. 
It might have been the atmospher- 
ic conditions which stirred to life 




TION! 



I BLUE BELL ANTIQUE SHOP ON U. S. 25, 

4 Miles North of Walton, Ky. 

Antiques - Furniture - Glass - China - Rugs - Clocks 

Chairs - Secretaries - Clothing - Shoes - Mattresses 

Linoleums - Pianos - Sewing Machines - Beds 



Tuesday, Jan. 17 

I 10:00 A. M. 1 

John Stubblefield 

OWNER and AUCTIONEER 



I 



cne suimoering romance tnai lurks 
within the breast of every man, or 
it might have been the simple de- 
sire of a man for a mate. At any 
rate Aaron took Miss Daniels in his 
arms and kissed her and whispered 
nonsensical things that somehow 
seemed to fit the occasion. 
•THE NEXT MORNING he found 
* another letter from Temple 
Creighton on his desk. "Dear 
Guardian: I'm sorry, but com- 
mands and demands from folks 
like you don't mean a thing when 
a girl is in love. And your little 
Temple is certainly in love. I ex- 
pect she'll be proposed to in the 
very near future." r „ 

Aaron buzzed for Miss Dan- 
iels. "Dear Temple: This thing 
has gone far enough. It's a pity 
you couldn't have been en- 
dowed with at least a fraction 
of your father's good sense. 
It is my wish that you Immed- 
iately send me the name and 
address of this boss of yours. 
I shall write to him at once." 

Aaron had hoped that that night 
he would find himself courageous 
enough to offer a proposal of mar- 
riage to Miss Daniels. Yet when 
again they were seated on the cliff 
watching the moon come up out of 
the ocean, his courage failed. 

Heavy-eyed he went to the office 
next morning to find a letter await- 
ing him from Temple Creighton. 

"Dear Guardian: You were right. 
He isn't the man I thought he was. 
Apparently he has just been amus- 
ing himself, with no idea of asking 
me to marry him. I do wish you'd 
talk to him. His name is Aaron Bell. 
Lovingly. Temple." 



Thursday, January 12, 1950 




J. L. HENDRIX 

Services for J. L. Hendirix, a life- 
long resident of Gallatin county, 
were held at 1 p. m., Tuesday at the 
Carlton funeral home, Warsaw, with 
Iburlal in Highland Cemetery. A 
member of Ten Mile Baptist Church, 
Mr. Hendirix died Sunday at his home 
in Glencoe. He was 81 years old. 

Survivors are his widow, Mrs. 
Pearl Hendrix; a son, Leonard Hen- 
drix, Warsaw; four daughters, Mrs. 
Ben Blyfhe, Mrs. Walter Stanford 
and Mrs. William Gibbons, all of 
Cincinnati, and Mrs. Earl Spencer 
of Warsaw. 

J. W. Spencer, cashier of the Dixie 
State Bank, Walton, is a grandson of 
Mr. Hendrix. 



"Ruth" Class to Meet 

The "Ruth" Class of the Walton 
Baptist Church wiil hold their meet- 
ing at the church Monday evening 
at 7:30. Let's begin the new year 
with 100% attendance.— Puib. Chm. 



—IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID?— 



Notice to Telephone Users 

The sleet storm on the night of January 4th did a great amount 
of damage to the outside plant of the Telephone Company. Trees 
fell on our lines breaking many poles and thousands of wires. 

Other wires were broken by the shear weight of the ice that col- 
lected on them. We have been working from daylight to dark, and 
when practical into the night, every day since the storm struck. 
We have brought experienced men and equipment , into this ter- 
ritory and we have employed all the local inexperienced help we 
can use. We have had material shipped from the factory by air- 
plane. We are doing everything possible to restore service with- 
out unnecessary delay and we sincerely appreciate the fact that 
our customers realize that the extent of the damage makes it im- 
possible to avoid some interruptions in service. 

It will be appreciated if all customers whose service is not restor- 
ed by Friday of this week will report their telephone at that time 
although a previous report may have been made. 

Consolidated Telephone Co. 



BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 



The Gamaliel Homemakers Club 
in Monroe county donated 40 books 
to the local school library and pur- 
chased a new large-size dictionary. 

The use of electric lights in to- 
bacco stripping rooms has .become a 
rather common practice in Fleming 
county. 

Boyle county 4-H. club members 
in baby beef projects made a total 
of $603 last year in state and county 
prizes. 

A. V. Piercy of Clinton county who 
had "a prolific stand" of wild onions 
prior to seeding fescue, states it is 
now difficult to find a single plant 



INDEPENDENCE, KENTUCKY 



— : Report of Condition at Close of Business December 31, 1949 :— 



Cash Balance $ 463.654.18 

U. S. Bonds __ 1,089.530.00 

State and County Bonds 20,000.00 

Loans and Discounts 319,465.19 

Banking House ' 5,000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures 1.00 

Other Assets 2,017.00 

Total Assets $1,899,667.37 



Demand Deposits $1,161^40^44 

Savings Deposits 583.281.14 

Time Deposits 15,563.63 

, Total Deposits _ $1,760,685.21 

Certified & Cashier Checks 7,8984)6 

Capital Stock 504)00.00 

Surplus Fund 504)00.00 

Undivided Profits & Reserves -,,, <t 264)26.73 

Reserve for Taxes 24557.37 

Dividends Payable 1-1-50 1,500.00 

Total Liabilities l_ $1,899,667.37 



-Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corppration- 






■\ 



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WALTON GARAGE, Walton, Ky, 



Thursday, January 12, 1950 

■"' i m 





WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 




(Mrs. Robert E. Hetterman has gone 
to (Louisville to visit Mr. Hetterman, 
who is in the veterans' hospital. 

Miss Pauline Stephenson has re- 
turned to U. K., after spending the 
holidays with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ira Stephenson. 

Mrs. Ira Stephenson and Mrs. 
Pascal Bush spent the New Year's 
weekend in •*fexington, the guests 
of itheir brothers and their families 
— the Henry boys. They also visit- 
ed relatives in Cynthiana and Paris. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Washburn 
had as Sunday guests, Mr. and Mrs. 
Herman Simmons and sons Herman, 
■Jr. and Johnny, Mr. and v Mrs. J. W. 
Loomls, Mrs. Ann Webster, Mrs. 
Carol Loornis and Barbara, and Pfc. 
Robert L. Moomis of Ft. Bragg, N. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Florence of 
Verona Road are the DMud parents 
of a new daughter, born December 
31st, named Belinda. 

John Hetterman and family have 
returned from Bowling Green, to 
their home in Crittenden. Mr. Het- 
terman was Assistant County Agent 
at Bowling Green for the past year. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lebus Stephenson 
and daughter Sherry Marlene enter- 
tained at 7 o'clock dinner Thursday 
evening for Mr. and Mrs. Leon Pen- 
nington and daughter Betty Joyce. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Feagan visited 
their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. C. B. 
Powers, and son Bobby of Gauley 
Bridge, West Virginia, a few days 
during the holidays. They were ac- 
companied by C. T. Best of Bethel 
Ohio. 



Mrs. Pearl Dunn of Dry Ridge, 
spent Saturday with Misses Anna 
and Moilie Chapman. 

Mrs. Lloyd Slpple of Dry Ridge 
spent last week with her daughter, 
Mrs, Wilbur Florence and family. 

We are glad to see Herman Sim- 
mons, Jr., able to he out again after 
being confined to his home with a 
broken leg. 





Pretty Beverly Younger, who 
taught Little Theater classes in 
the Northwest, turned to radio 
and now plays leading roles in 
the dramas on WLW-NBC's "Cur- 
tain Time" Wednesdays at 10:30 
p.m., EST. 



How would yon like a stack of fresh, 
orlsp, lovable, spendable MONEY- 
available to yo« EVERY MONTH! 
w B k? 7 yo » can W* "-with a mem- 
"M^ P ? t u *ST ,,mp,e ' "tomatio 
vm n *^ of ;i he -Month" Club! WHAT 
YOU DO: If you're employed by a firm, 
»o to your payroll department and eet 
your signature affixed to the Payroll 
Savings Plan for the purchase of United 
States Saving Bonds. Or, if you're self- 
employed, your bank can offer a simi- 
lar plan — the Bond-A-Month Plan 
WHAT YOU GET: In just ten years' 
your bonds will mature. In ten years,' 
they 11 be worth four dollars for every 
three Invested! n .s t n 




Shoes, Dresses and Hats - One-fourth to One-third Off 
Odd Lots of Blouses, Slips and Robes - Greatly Reduced 

Town & Country Shop 

WALTON, KY. 




Dairy Tips From the 

County Agent's Office 

The profit derived from milking 
cows can be greatly increased by 
following a few simple rules, ac- 
cording to Bill Davis, Boone County 
Agent. 

1— Cows respond to kindness — 
rough handling, vicious dogs, ill- 
fitting or irritating milkers, and 
loud noises around the barn all help 
to cause a cow to hold up her milk. 
Keep dogs, cats and strangers out of 
the barn when milking. 

2 — Milk at the same time every 
day — cows are creatures of habit and 
regular milking, feeding and caring 
for the dairy cows is an important 
factor in getting the most milk and 
profit. 

3— Stimulate the milk let-down by 
washing the udder and feeding grain 
just before milking. 

4— Milk qukfkly— when the milk- 
ing is started it should be done 
rapidly. If a milking machine is 
used do not leave it on the cow after 
the milk flow has ceased. The milk- 
ink machine will creep up on the 
teats causing damage to the delicate 
membranes of the udder which may 
result in masti tis and in causing 
the cow to become a stripper. Too 
much stripping develops strippers, 
decreases production and has a ten- 
dency to dry cows off* j 

5— When first milking a heifer, do 
so gently so the heifer will not dis- 
like milking and (become a kicker or 
poor milker. 



—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



RUSSELL'S REFRIGERATOR and 
APPLIANCE REPAIR — Freezers, 
refrigerators, milk coolers, motors, 
pumps, etc.; also limited number 
rebuilt refrigerators, guaranteed 
for whole year. Phone Ind. 7430. 

4t-2» 

INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers it's 
members life insurance, auto and 
truck insurance (largest in Ken- 
tucky), the and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tt-2 



Page Seven 



WANTED— Man to raise tomatoes on 
shares; any amount to suit; furn- 
ish everything. Mrs. Grace Jones, 
Walton, Route 1. _t-2 



FOR SALE— Two work horses, 8 yrs. 
old. G. R. Epperly, Bullock Pen 
Road. Phone Ind. 6696. 4t-2* 



FOR SALE— Ladies (black coat, size 
14; child's green coat, size 12 
Mrs. Charles Dennler, 116 North 
Main St., Walton, Ky. it-2» 



WANT TO RENT— Two or 3-room 
house, close to bus line, either 
cash or will work out rent. W. M. 
McGowan, General Delivery, Wil- 
liamstown, Ky. lt-2* 



CHUCKS and Hatching Eggs from 
high producing,, pullorum-tested 
Reds. Breeders immunized against 
Newcastle. Chicks from such a 
flock can make money for you. 
Grant Maddox, Florence. Phone 
384. et-2 




PAIR MARES— Will trade for cows 
or will sell cheap. H. A. English, 
Walton. Phone Walton 850. lt-2* 



FOR SALE_— %■ length camel hair 
coat; two size 12 suits, and one 
size 10 suit, good condition; also 
Welch baby buggy. Mrs. Dan 
Roberts, Walton. Phone 66. lt-2* 



FOR SALE — Rubber tired wagon, 
6x12 flat bed, good tires, cheap. 
Phone Ind. "7430. lt-2* 



FOR SALE — Two-year-old Western 
mare pony. H. A. English, Walton. 
Phone Wajton 850. lt-2* 



__ State No. 73-763 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

Report of condition of Dixie State Bank of Walton in the 
State of Kentucky at the close of business on December 31. 1949. 

ASSETS 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve 
II <ir£?J?' and t c ^ U ^ ms in Process of collection ._$ 361,549.41 
U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 869 000 00 

Loans and discounts (including $32.41 overdrafts) " 460 ISs'S 
Bank premises owner $10,000.00, furniture and " 4b0 ' 15,3 - 23 

fixtures $1,200.00 _ __ 

TOTAL ASSETS 



GLAZED BRICK TILE -^.1,375 sjze 
12"x5". Phone Independence 6142. 

lt-2 



ENROLL during January in Blue 
Cross Hospitalization through Boone 
County Farm Bureau. Family 
rates $24.50 per year; most hospital 
expenses covered. Get further in- 
formation, John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. _t-2 



LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships 
and corporations _ 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships 
and corporations 

Deposits of United States Government "' 
(including postal savings) 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $1 593 - 462 74 

Other liabilities _____" — _-* 1 _' Dy ^ 4 b2.74 

TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including " 
subordinated obligations shown below) 



- 11,200.00 
$1,701,902.64 



-$1,164,628.29 

- 271,731.10 

2,877.47 
154,225.88 



1,020.00 
-$1,594,482.74 



CARD OF THANKS— 

Mrs. John H. Vest and children 
wish to express their deep appreci- 
ation and thanks for the many kind 
and thoughtful deeds of their fri- 
ends and neighbors during the recent 
illness and death of Mrs. Vest's be- 
loved husband, John H. Vest. To the 
ministers, Rev. Garrett, Rev. Hoff- 
man and Rev. Nichols, for their kind 
helpfulness; to the Baptist choir; 
Chambers & Grubbs, and all others 
who helped more than we can tell 
during this trying time, we extend 
our most sincere .thanks. lt-2* 



CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

sSSSSb I * 30,000.00 

Undivided profits "" I~"Z~""" 274iq on 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS __""""" $ 107419 90 

TOTAL LIABILITIES & CAPITAL ACCOUNTS -$1,701 WW 

*~J1 This ba i nk ' s f t? ital °°nskl!s of 50° shares common stock with 
total par value of $30,000.00. 

MEMORANDA 
Assets pledged or- assigned to secure liabilities 

and for other purposes . +. $250,000.00 

I, James W. Spencer, cashier of the above-named bank do 
solemnly swear that the above statement ft true, and that Tfully 
and correctly represents the true state of the several matters here 
in contained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge anc I belief 

^T^Sf,'' JAMES W - SPEN CER. Cashier! 

Walter D. Vest, G. W. Baker, A. H. Gaines, Directors. 

State of Kentucky, County of Boone, ss; 

^-,°l n t0 , and ^scribed before me this 10th day of January 1950 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank' 
hi - BESSIE C. JOHNSON, Notary Public' 

My commission expires September 12, 1953. ««i«iry i-uouc. 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 




Z00& a// around it and you'// foiow 
ttsi/our AJWT^tl- S/lOlWD BUT / 




J%RS7!. .andMnest. . .atZowe&t Cost/ 



Only Chevrolet brings you all these major advantages at lowest cost— 
NEW STYLE-STAR BODIES BY FISHER . NEW TWO-TONE FISHER 
INTERIORS « CENTER-POINT STEERING • CURVED WINDSHIELD 
with PANORAMIC VISIBILITY • BIGGEST OF ALL LOW-PRICED 
CARS . EXTRA-ECONOMICAL T<f OWN-OPERATE-MAINTAIN 
• PROVED CERTI-SAFE HYDRAULIC BRAKES 



INTRODUCING CHEVROLET'S EXCLUSIVE NEW 



POWE§^___ 




Dixie Chevrolet Sales 



Phone 95 



Walton, Ky. 



AUCTION 

Saturday, Jan. 21 

10:00 A.M. 

We have contracted with Bradford & Worthington to sell at auction, on the above 
date, located on State Route 16, 

2 Miles South of Verona, Ky. 

The following described property: Team and harness, extra good; 2 brood 
sows, to farrow in February; 1 2 shoats.-weigh about 100 lbs. each; 1 McCormick- 
Deering No. 9 mowing machine; 1 hay rake; 1 wagon and box bed; 1 sled; 1 disc 
harrow; 1 turning plow, steel beam ; 1 corn drill with fertilizer attachment ; 1 Dixie 
plow; 1 five-shovel plow; 1 set of stretchers; 2 doubletrees and singletrees; 1 corn 
scoop; 1 hayfork; 1 tobacco setter; I three-row marker; 1 twenty-gallon kettle; 
1 scalding box; 1 neck yoke; 2 milk pails; 1 sprinkler; 2 chairs. 

FEED— 1 00 bushels of corn, and 5 stacks of hay. 

Terms Cash 

J. it WORTHINGTON & B. W. SPAULDING, Owners 
BRADFORD AUCTION CO. 

Florence, Kentucky Phone Walton 671 or Florence 229 

Auctioneers: Bradford & Worthington 
Sales Manager: Lucian Bradford 



5* 






j 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 12, 1950 



j FLORENCE 



Mrs. Marie Kinman spent the New 
Year's holidays very pleasantly with 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert West and son 
Bobbie of Louisville, and shared in 
the celebration of the fourth wed- 
ding anniversary of Mr. and Mts. 
West. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Howard and 
Lindy Sebree are at home follow- 
ing a vacation in Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Tanner were 
guests of the Perry Aliens, New 
Year's day. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Easterday and 
son Lee were .guests the past weke 
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. O. 
Easterday of Akron, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldridgo Carpenter 
were New Year's guests of their dau- 
ghter, Mrs. R. G. Keyer, and Mr. 
Keyer. 

Mrs. Harry Daugherty and Mrs. 
Paul Chaney were hostesses to a 
number of relatives and friends 
with a luncheon Dec. 30th at the 
home of the former, the honor guest 
ibeing Mrs. J. F. Daugherty. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell House and 
Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Taylor departed 



for Florida, Tuesday of last week. 

Services for Allen M. Dauby, 55, 
who succumbed suddenly of a heart 
attack, were held from the Talia- 
ferro funeral home, Erlanger, Jan. 3 
at 11 a. m„ with Rev. H. L. Reid of- 
ficiating. Interment was in Hopeful 
cemetery. Sympathy of the com- 
munity is extended the family. 

Mrs. Irene Renaker entertained 
most graciously over the New Year's 
holidays with a turkey dinner, for 
the following guests: Mr. and Mrs. 
Carlton Crisler and sons Gary and 
Steve, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Barth 
and daughter " Marsha Jane, Mrs. 
Hellfcn Rouse ami sons Tommy, Jack 
and «rent, Mrs.' Mamie Cahill, Miss 
Ruth Cahill and Robert Huller of Ft. 
Mitchell, Mrs. Eva Miller and son 
Renaker and the hostess. 

Harry K. Daugherty and brother, 
Jos. F., and wife and Mrs. Minnie 
Daugherty of Walton, were holiday 
guests of Dr. and Mrs. Harry Dau- 
gherty. i 

Sympathy of the community goes 
out to the family of J. B. Conrad, 79, 
who succumbed Wednesday at the 
home of a son, John, of Burlington 
Road. Services were held from the 
Hopeful church, Saturday, with Rev. 
Hodges and Rev. Andrees officiat- 
ing. The Stith funeral home was in 



$r 



GRANT 

WU1JA.MSTOWN.KX 



MS 2020 



SATURDAY ONLY * JAN. 14 

2— ACTION HITS— 2 

hit no. 1 

Johnny Maclc Brown — in 

"LAW OF THE WEST" 

hit no. 2 

Kirk Douglass - Laraine Day — in 

"MY DEAR SECRETARY" 



2 DAYS . . . STARTING SUNDAY 



3rW -CaoaPu>a'«6t -fawn,' voen. from, (X/a/wuyt Bft£& \ 

jane Wyman- Dennis Morgan j 

Ttie Lady lakes k Sailor ] 



"EvEAROBIzStSSSssr mssr& 



CURTC 



I 



A&tS«& 



TUE. & WED. 



JAN. 17 ■ 18 



JAMES CA6NEY 



WHITE HEAT 



CO J1Ai*fN0 

VIRGINIA MAYO 



THUR. & FBI. * JAN. 19 - 20 

2-^ACTION HITS— 2 

Hit No. 1— Jon Hall— in 

"DEPUTY MARSHALL" 

Hit No. 2— Roibt. Montgomery 
— in— 
"ONCE MORE MY DARLING" 



FARM BARGAIN 

1/2 mile from Walton on Route 16; 3Vz acres ground with 5-room, 
one-floor plan home with. bath; house in good shape; barn, 
chicken house; ground is practically level, with good dug pond. 
Priced to sell at 57,500. 

REL C. WAYMAN & SONS 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION BROKERS 
623 Washington St., Covington, Ky. HE 5107, Ind. 5064, JU 4895 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Yards 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market in the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to us. Why 
not now? 

Reference: Ask the first 
man you meet 



High Prices for Tobacco 

These tobacco growers sold their crop with "men who 

-.. — rV/ ■ 1 — — — : = 

know tobacco best" ... at the 

Brite-Lite Whse. 

Carrollton, Kentucky 

' — — lbs. avg. 

Tom Childers and D. Ferguson - 2912 $57.87 

A. J. Ogden and Orie Morrison _ 1652 60.03 

Susie M. Stephens and Stanley Clifford -2250 57.30 

J. C. Bedinger and B. Shields lr ...2198 54.87 

A. C. Rosenstiel and Rosenstiel .3860 54.86 

B. B. Hodges and Walton ..._ 1 040 55.97 

Frank Kaelin and D. C. Richardson ,794 56.58 

Nick Trapp and Son _.._...5556 55.90 

Grace Brown and Walter Buckler 2086 52.65 



charge of arrangements and burial 
was in Hopeful cometery. 

Mr. and (Mrs. Geo. B. Miller had 
as Sunday dinner guests, Mrs. W. R. 
Miller, Blayme Miller of Park Hills, 
and <Renaker Miller. - 

Trooper R. R. Miller departed for 
Louisville, Sunday, where he will be 
stationed for an indefinite period. 

We rgeret to report the Illness of 
Robert Woodward .the past week. He 
is improving, however. 
Women's Society Meets 

The Women's Society of the Flor- 
ence Methodist Church convened on 
Jan. 3 at the church. The session 
opened with prayer by Mrs. C, N. 
Ogg. Mrs. Paul Chaney, president, 
conducted the business period and 
reports were heard, followed toy de- 
votions by Mrs. C. A. McKlbben. 
Mrs. Helen Bethel was chairman of 
the program entitled 'Take My 
Love," which included the songs, 
"Love Devlne" and "Savior Thy Dy- 
ing Love," by the group. The ses- 
sion closed with prayer by Mrs. Ella 
Bethel. Members attending were 
Mesdames Ethel Daugherty, Pearl 
Baker, Eva Miller, Allie Markesbery, 
Kathryn Oliver, Ella Bethel, C. N. 
Ogg, C. A. MoKihben, Helen Bethel, 
Ida Miller, Nannie. Mitchell, Naomi 
Chaney, Leila Allen and Miss Mary 
A. (Markesbery. — Pub. Chin. 

1 — — • ■ 

UK TO SPONSOR 
CHOIR FESTIVAL ' 

Church choirs from nine Central 
Kentucky towns will meet at Lex- 
ington, Sunday, January 22 for a 
choir festival sponsored by the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Extension De- 
partment and the MacDowell Music 
Club of Lexington. More than 200 
choir members from Danville, Leb- 
anon, Frankfort, Lexington, Midwa'y, 
Mt. Sterling, Paris, Richmond and 
Winchester will participate in the 
festival. 

Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



HEALTH AND CHARM 
CONVENTION SUBJECTS 

Discussions of health, charan and 
good looks, will have a place in the 
program scheduled for the Farm 
and Home Convention at (Lexington, 
January 31 to February 3rd. 

Charles P. Taylor, educational di- 
rector for Kentucky of the American 
Cancer Society,, will show a Walt 
Disney film and speak on the sub- 
ject, "Can We Defeat the Traitor 
Within?" 

Dr. Bruce Underwood, Louisville, 
state health commissioner, will dis- 
cuss "Progress in Making Kentucky 
a Healthy Place." 

Miss Mary Stuyvesant, New York 
beauty advisor who has as her slo- 
gan, "Look Your Best to Do Your 
Best," will make two appearances on 
the program. She will speak on, 
"Every Woman Can Be Beautiful," 
and again on "Fashion and You." 

SOCIAL SECURITY NOTES 

On January 19, Edward J. Bolte, 
Field Representative of the Social 
Security Administration office, will 
toe at the Erlanger Post Office from 
10 a. m. to il a. m., and at the Wil- 
liamstown Post Office from 2 p. m. 
to 3 ip. m. All persons interested in 
the old -age and survivors insurance 
program, or applicants for social se- 
curity cards should consult this rep- 
resentative. ' 

EWe numbers are gradually in- 
creasing in Caldwell county, there 
now being about 2,500 head of 
breeding stock. 

A total of 11,000 tons of limestone 
was spread in Livingston county 
last year. 

In 1947 there were eight farm 
tractors in Harlan county; now there 
are about 50. 

Homemakers in Rowan county 
have set a goal of 500 as the num- 
ber of rural mail iboxes to be paint- 
ed and stenciled this year. 



1950 CHICK SEASON NOW OPEN 

1 Week and 2 Week Old Chicks Available 

(while they last) 

All Chicks from Blood Tested Flocks! 
ORDER NOW . . . PRICES ARE RIGHT! 



Pollitt's Hatchery 

PHONE FLORENCE 159 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



R. W. Gross Appliances 

Dealer for G. EL and Philco Appliances 

INVENTORY SALE 



Reductions of 10% to 15% on 

Television Sets, Refrigerators, Stoves, Home Freezers, 
Radios, Heaters and Many Small Appliances! 

"SEE GROSS & SAVE" 
Phone Ind. 5111 Independence, Ky. 




WHAT A WALLOP ! 

That ice storm last week really dealt me a paralyzing blow! 

Falling tree limbs and heavy lotdings of ice pulled down my 
lines in scores of places, snapped off poles and cross arms by 
the dozen, and disrupted my service throughout this entire area. 

All available linemen and servicemen were called out immedi- 
* ately and emergency repairs were pushed with all possible 
speed, despite constant rain and severe weather handicaps. 



Linemen worked early and late, scarcely taking time out to eat 
or sleep, but unfortunately they couldn't 'be everywhere at 
once. Transmission lines had to be repaired first, and then 
primary, secondary and house service lines, in that order. 

It was a tremendous undertaking because the damage was so 
widespread, but the biggest part of the work is now finished, 
and our men will stay on the job until service is back to normal 
for everyon.e ,, 

AH of us at Community Public Service Company wish to thank 
you for your patience and understanding of our difficulties 
during a most trying time. 

We especially wish to thank those who reported fallen lines, 
gave our men food and hot coffee and otherwise helped during 
the emergency. Your cooperation i» sincerely appreciated. 



Thanks a lot! 



REDDY KILOWATT 
Your Electric Servant 



Community Public Service Company 



INCORPORATED 




Thursday, January 12, 1950 



I 






WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Nine 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 

State and Federal " 

FARMERS FILE BY JANUARY 31st! 

Experienced - Quick - Efficient - Reasonable! 

Save Money by Filing the Right Way! 

Bring Last Year's Duplicates, If You Have Them 

Office Hours: Evenings and Week Ends 

R. V.LENTS 



i 



| STAFFORDSBURG I 

*" ■ ■■ ■ ' ■ w i nn ! ■! 



1 Lloyd Avenue 



Florence, Ky. 




Hamilton & Jones 



Invites You to Shop! 



Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS- 
LOWEST PRICES 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and Seel 




Farms for Sale 

^Jtv^Ft:* ?™ °? V L n * y ' State h tehway; 7-room modern house; 
new 4-room tenant house; large combinaUon'^arir, equipped for 
dairy; new milk house; good tobacco barn, racked off; one other 
t hA,fcr PP i" g u r °°T : double gara & e w » th stor ^ e sP^e; brood 

fai ?T'J^t Ck n n t h °, US€ i ^° Smoke houses - co ™ cril >; new 
base 2.6, most all tractor land; this is a nice farm; price $25,000. 

114 r^f^ E ^ — Boone county, State highway; 7 rooms and bath, base- 

Si«V r , nace ' str ' ctl >' modern; large combination barn; new 

rv S mI* - 6 ' I?t rge , 0rch f rd - ; fme Iake -*«*ed with fish; this is one 

of the prettiest spots In Boone county, with between one-half 

and one mile road frontage; price $22,000. 

146 ^?^~ 7 mi L es from F16rence - Just off Route 42, on good road; 
good 5-room house; combination barn, fixed for dairy; milk 
house; plenty of outbuildings; three ponds; new base 1.9; this 
Is all tractor land; price $17,800. 

214 AORES— 15 miles from Florence; 6-room house; two barns- 

• i°r£ T ° th t T ^tbuildings; 18 acres alfalfa; well fenced -new 

tobacco base 2.7; price $14,500. "Jncea, new 

160 ACRES— Near Walton on State highway; dandy 7-room house 
^l h Z^ ; 2°j d ?3, ry barn: ™"khousef tobacco ba^TsVripp 
h£X ^.VS dOUM , e ^ arage; double <»™ ■*! smoke house; 
, 9^?r«^ U8e L n T,L ayang house; mound ceUai - to »>acco base 
*i^^ aC I!f ^ h f at ' 15 - acres alfalfa - 3° acre s mixed hay, 6 acres 
timber rest of farm tillable; 2 newly developed springs with 
concrete troughs, pond and small lake, twi cisteVnl; ^ pricedTt 

^JfPSFZ^fiZF** ° n ? tate road > 17 mi]es from Florence; two 
Kt^SnJ!* 1 ?* 8, + eaui ?P ed for d ai^: all necessary outbuUd 
ings; plenty of water; tobacco base 2.6; price $10 500 

64 ACRES— Near Walton; 7-room house, part basement- small 
house; combination barn with 12 stanchions; new X' house- 
SsTLKf T miIk : double garage; chicken hole; smoke 

^ISflB&g* ""* cooler and 6 ™ lk cans: base 15 

■ ^ ACRES— Near Verona on State highway; barn, strippine room- 
no house; double garage; price $5,500. siri PPing room, 

104 ACRES— Kenton county; 5-room house; combination barn 

OSOf&t^SZ *** house ' and other oSSffiidiSS 

oase l.b, this is a blue grass farm; price $8,500 

^ihSimflte 7 " r< ?° m modern house : barn with 9 cow 
SSK& 2 m i; lk pnce U S3 n 750 e ° Utbulldin ^ a " in ««»-_*«t 7 

65 ACRES— 4-room house; 2 barns; garage; smoke house- hen 
, J^J" 00 ** hOUSe: 10 aCreS a " alfa: baseTsfprice $5 8oS 

ct^^T^" 111 * of i main road, hard road to farm, 30 miles from 

^fb^Lf^SSi^SfSi ^ b ? ra ^ 17 stanchions; new 
milk house; tobacco barn; electric in Ml buildinss- Dlentv rrf 
water; 30 acres alfalfa; price $6,850. . amimngs ' P lent y of 

85 ACRES-^Near Verona; 6-room house; combination barn eonim 
ped for dairy; electric in all buildings- 14 acres of ha^\f1^L 
of tractor land; base %Si price £S. * y ' M aCTeS 

^price^so: * 2 ' TOam ' h ° U6e; 2 ban,S; P lent y ,of ™«to; electricr 
80 >. A ^? ES ~*l? m , iles from town ; 6-room house; barn- tool shed- 

^/SP^ 10 mlles ^ m Florence on State highway; bus service- 
s-room house; combination barn; new milking parlor- base of 
1.4 acres; price $6,000. 8 panor, oase or 

38% ACBE5--S miles from Florence on State htehwav 6-room " 

2oS^r : vf fruit trees: *•** and WBK'iSBP 

^^s^^^ss^m^ 5 SttiMtotem! ,tws house ' 

"'SSF? IN SMALL TOWN, 20 miles from Covington-lO-room 
•huse and storage space, water in house; being^sed fo/Zo" 

iT«« €s iii M * !b ^ 8enient and fumace ; «** cSSS^mS So 

a 3-apartment house; has 1 acre of ground; this is S^nfiW 
ful piece of property; bus service; ,prL $7500 wonder- 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES » 

GENERAL STORE-New 4-room cottage, garage, feed stores .these 
are all good buildings; store building is llrgewithpfentv^f 

^rei1t g i a vS erfua business; prlced * ^SffM 

CA !SZ^t n i on °°unty; place of business and all equtoment- 4- 
, room ^ living quarters; double,garage with lot of s?S space- 
rs pla<* is ideal y located business the best; owner selling 

S n t < S? m l2 f health; **" ^^ 'books; Price $12^000 Can bf 
handled with small down payment or willTade to farm 

"'Sately^ Pike ' ^ t0 H ^ wav .; Pr^e $1,100, if sold 

R. P. Coleman 

Reed Estate and Auction Sales 
FLORENCE. KENTUCKY. PHONE FLORENCE 148 



The wonderful weather enjoyed 
over most of the holiday week was 
conduoive to much visiting among 
relatives, friends and neighbors, 
which all adds up to a better com- 
munity spirit. 

This year, for the first time with- 
in the memory of most of the folks in 
this neighborhood, a watoh night 
service was held at' the church. We 
did not have a large number pres- 
ent, but the program was very much 
enjoyed by all present. After sing- 
ing a few songs, a prayer or two and 
some fitting remarks by Rev. John 
Wheary, several persons took part 
in reading the first six chapters of 
the gospel of Mark. At eleven -thirty 
a wonderful spread of sandwiches 
and cookies, with coffee or cocoa, 
was enjoyed. At 12 all joined hands 
and sang, "Blest Be the Tie That 
Binds," and after a few prayers all 
left for home, having made a good 
start on the New Year. Let's plan 
for a larger,, Watch Night service 
next year. 

Paul Keeney, who was home for 
a three-day Christmas weekend, re- 
turned to Hudson, N. Y., on Dec. 26. 

Mrs. Wm. Brooks joined her hus- 
band, who has been here several 
weeks, for the holidays. They plan 
to make their home here. We are 
glad to see them back. 

Several letters and cards have 
been received from the travelers 
from our neighborhood, telling of 
the fine time they are having. We 
will be glad to welcome them back 
and trust they will be pleased to re- 
turn. Among those away are Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Former and son, Mrs! 
Daisy Richardson and Miss Helen 
Richardson, who are in Texas, and 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Ballinger who are 
in Arizona.- 

Having spent ten days visiting 
friends and relatives, Miss Hope 
Keeney returned to Washington, D. 
C, where she. is an Occupational 
Therapist at Walter Reed Hospital. 



We are so glad to have as the 
evangelist assigned to our church, 
Rev. Cal Ryan. We hope that the 
weather will improve and more 
people can enjoy his fine sermons 
and worship with us. 

TREFOIL DOES WELL 
IN FLEMING COUNTY 

A half- acre planting of birds-foot 
trefoil on the C. E. Gorman farm in 
Fleming county has been observed 
with interest, notes Farm Agent J. 
I. Stephens. It was seeded on frozen 
rye ground last February. A good 
stand was obtained and by Novem- 
ber it had made as much growth as 
alfalfa would have made on the 
same land. The plants were sturdy 
and well branched after being rath- 
er heavily grazed. Mr. Gorman 
plans to sow 15 acres next spring. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 
Phone HEmlock 2458 



DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

613 Madison Ave. 

Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday. 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



HOW TO FEED FOR MORE MtlK 






AMERICANS NEED 

VITAMINS 




THEN TRY , 
0ne-A-Day 

(HAND) 

Vitamins 

Otla package of genuine One-A-Dat 
(brand) Multiple vitamin capsules/ 
They cost only $2.00. Take one each 
day for 60 days, if you are not en- 
tirely satisfied, return the empty 
package to your druggist and he will - 
refund your money. Remember, vi- 
tamins help keep your energy, nerves 
and digestion up to par. Money back 
tf .. J»delight«}. ..CkfjHQr druggist 
for genuine Onk-A-Day (buind) 
Multiple Vitamin Capsules, made 
by Miles Laboratories. Look for the 
figure "1" on the blue package. 



DR. PAUL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. bchnippering 



1. Plenty of Good Quality Roughage 

• PLUS • 

2. Grain, properly mixed with — 

3. MASTER BLEND 

Dairy Concentrate 



& 



z± 



For complete instructions ask your 
Master Mix Dealer for the Master 
Blend Feeding Program. 



m 



■*. / 1 




L. J. METZGER 

O^JOMETRIST-^- 

and 

OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 0535 

Office Hours ... 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 




STURGEON 

Electrical Service 

, * 

—Wiring of All Kinds— 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 
—Phone 71 or 1396— 



: lti.»"i ' 



Grinding and Mixing 

We do custom grinding and mixing . . . we. furnish 
the concentrates ... you furnish the grain — 
Here are some formulas: — 

100 lbs. Ground Corn 
50 lbs. Ground Oats 
100 lbs. Master Mix Laying Mash Concentrate 
250 lbs. 20% Egg Mash 

3 % Fat Cost— $3.8 1 per 1 00 lbs. 

8% Fibre 

200 lbs. Ground Corn on Cob 
100 lbs. 33% Dairy Concentrate 
300 lbs. 16% Dairy , 

3% Fat Cost— $2.93 per 100 lbs. 

9% Fibre 

Walton Feed Mill 

(Incorporated) 
WALTON, KY. PHONE 57 



•• 



PONTIAC TRADE-IN SALE 

Examine These Bargains Before You Buy! 



'46 CHEVROLET SEDAN 

Black finish, driven little JtlDQ 1 * 

radio and heater M»*wo 



'49 PLYMOUTH SEDAN 

Maroon finish, sun visor, $1795 

radio, heater, many extras 



'47 PONTIAC 2-Tone Grey 

17,000 miles, radio, heater, $1395 



looks new 



'39 CHEVROLET Town Sedan 

Radio, heater, covers, $495 

49,000 miles; bargain «P*«»i» 



'46 CHEVROLET Station Wagon 
8-Passenqer, fully equipped, £1003 
dandy utility car _„._ 1_T1__ * 1US5 



'39 DODGE Business Coupe 

Black finish; a good $395 



economical car 



'41 PLYMOUTH TUDOR 



Black finish, radio, heater, 
seat covers; see this today 



$695 



'47 FORD Super Deluxe 
Sedan; Rio red finish, $1095 

fully equipped, looks new 



'37 PONTIAC 6 SEDAN 



Black finish, radio, heater, 
seat covers; bargain 



$295 



'48 PONTIAC Hydramatic 

Sedan; grey finish, radio. $1695 

heater; a showroom car j 



Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 
- All are one-owner cars traded m on the NEW '50 PONTIACS. 

Terms to Suit - Up, to 24 Months to Pay! 

Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 



<" . 



Page Ten 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 1 2, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION ^jm^ 



Classified advertising rate 1b 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash In advance. 



SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE— All nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf-1 



FOR SALE— Used, Model LA John 
Deere tractor, plow, cultivator and 
mower; Allis-Chalmer "C" tractor, 
plows and cultivator. Butler Bros., 
Nicholson. Phone Ind. 5053. tf-49 

INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE — Re- 
ports prepared, thirty years ex- 
perience. W. G. Hargis, 34th and 
Graff Streets, Covington. COlonial 
7244, Independence 6488. 2t-l* 



FOR SALE— 7 heifers and 8 steers, 
weigh about 300 lbs. O. L. Easton, 
2% miles East of Devon on Bristow 
Road. Phone Ind. 6216. 2tl 



FOR SALE— All kinds of Oak Lum- 
ber, fancing planks. All types of 
dressed lumber. Stevens Lumber 
dealer, Phone Florence 419. tf-50 

LOST— (Fix hound, white, black and 
tan spotted female, wearing col- 
lar. James Tupman, Florence, Ky. 
Liberal reward. Please call Jay 

_ Webster, Walton 1240. 2t-l* 



FOR SALE — Kenton county farm,! 
close in, good dairy or tobacco! 
land, in blue grass, house, bam. 
Owner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, 
Ky. 4t-l* 



FOR SALE — 1946 %-ton Chevrolet 
truck with flat bed and racks. 
Phone -Walton 106, or see A. D. 
Warner, Walton, Ky. 2t-l 

FOR SALE — 2 registered Guernsey 
heifers, excellent pedigree, 10 and 
15 months old; sell or trade for 
building site. See at L. M. Deuser, 
Staffordsburg Road, Whites Tower. 

2t-2* 

FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
First class work, guaranteed, good 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf-2 

WANT TO BUY— Dead Stock; horses 
$2.50; cows $2.50f hogs 50c cwt, 
according to size and condition. 
Phone Walton, day 178, night 772, 
or Butler 6901. Griffin Fertilizer 
Co. * - tf-1 



FOR SALE — Jim Brown, model 6, 
Hammermlll; purebred Aberdeen- 
Angus yearling heifer, and riding 

- saddle. A. W. Franz, Green Road. 
Phone Ind. 6747. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE-^Hatchet null, Smalley 
No. 5, mounted with 5-horse elec- 
tric motor; brand new, will sell for 
half. Rosegate Farm, Dixie High- 
way. . 2t-l* 

FOR RENT — Power Chain Saws with 
one man $3.50 per hour. Phone 
Florence 419. tf-50 

FOR SALE— Cheap, battery brooder, 
1,000-chlck capacity; steam oper- 
ated. Ind. 6757. Box 14, Decoursey 
Pike, White Villa. - 2t-l* 

FOR SALE — Beautiful wine color 
two piece living room suite; also 
chair and floor lamps, used only 
six months. Rosegate Farm, Dixie 
Highway. 2t-l* 



FOR SALE— Fat hogs, weigh 225 lbs. 
John L. Feagan, Walton-Beaver 
Road, Walton, Ky. 2t-l* 



WASTED TO BUY— Several 1000 ft. 
of Ash, Oak and Walnut lumber 
in the tree. Call Florence 419; 

tf-50 



YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. tf-46 



COVINGTON 

Ef-Ko ARMY Store 

5th and MADISON 

FOR MORE THAN 



27 y. 



ears 

WE'VE ALWAYS SOLD 

Good 

Work 

Shoes 

We fit small feet, large feet, 
narrow feet wide feet I 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

STORE 

508 MADISON AVENUE 
COVINGTON 






Hamilton & Jones . invites You to shop: 

-:- Walton, Ky. 



Phone 99 



GIGANTIC AFTER 
INVENTORY SALE 

PRICES SLASHED 



2.98 Ladies' House Dresses $2.25 

Ladies' House Dresses $1.19 

Children's Dresses -«^89c 

Girls' Dresses $1.25 

Ladies' Felt Hats _ $1.00, $1.79, $2.29 

Ladies' Purses J: 79c and $1.00 

Ladies' Change Purses 30c and 50c 

Remnants of Yard Goods 

Earrings - 55c pr., 2 pr. $1.00 

Scatter Pins , 55c 

Pearls, long strings $1.00 

Cigarette Lighters (fancy) $5.00 

Tie Holders .... $1.00 

2.98 Men's Pajamas (A only) __„ $1.79 

Girls' Skirts (wool) $1.00 

Ladies' Skirts (wool) .. $1.00 

Lace Collars -.-—.. : 50c 

Girls' White Cotton Blouses 50c 

(sizes 5 to 12) 

Boys' Sport Shirts .... 79c 

(short sleeves) 

Ladies' Housecoats ^... $1.39 

(small sizes - orig. 3.98) 



Boys' Polo Shirts .. - T -. 79c 

Anklets _J . 15c 

Men's Colored Polo Shirts 79c 

Men's Mufflers (colors) $1.00 

Jackets - --•- $100 

Boys' Ties ~~ 39c and 49c 

Ear Muffs 10c 

Little Girls' Knitted Bonnets 15c 

Baby Bonnets 59c 

Ladies' Houseslippers $1.00 

(assorted styles and sizes) 

Knitted Suite — 79c 

Little Boys' Pajamas 1_ $1.25 

Boys' Caps (odds) _.. 39c 

Men's Caps ". — 39c 

Boys' Coveralls : — - 79c 

Men's Work Pants $1.49, $1.59, $2.49 

Boys' Wool Pants % $1.79 

Boys' Light Weight Overalls $1.65 

Boys' Ctoon Pants $1.65 

Men's Neckties 79c 

1.98 Ladies' Uniforms J.. $1.39 

Wool Flannel, 54" wide 1. 98c yd. 

Ladies' Better Dresses $5.00, $6.50, up 



BiSken Sizes * Assorted Styles 

No Exchange On These Purchases 



I CONRAD HARDWARE; 




New! OLD ENGLISH 

Cream Wax 
POLISH 

6 ox. 25* 59* 

for your Until fumitur*. 



IS THE 
FLOOR WAX 
WOMEN PREFER 




iecaude its Meant, 
£atf5 and fasti. 

65c Pt. $1.10 Qt. 



Oil Mop— 79c 



kJOHH SMITH 





ALL ALUMINUM, mailbox NAMEr 
PLATE, complete with bolts, nuts and 
brackets for mounting in any of the 
three positions shown — 

Single Nameplate $1.00 

Double Nameplate -~ $1.75 




$39.50— 



BLACK 

FLAG 

Contains Ctilordane (1068) 
• the finest roach killer 
known. 



ROACH 
SPRAT 

50C PINT 
85* per Quart 



for Service 



Large or Smalt 
.... See Powen 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES 01 : HOUSEHOLD 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKY 



TREES — Trimmed, topped and re- 
moved. Stevens Forestry Service, 
Phone Florence 419. or JU-5553. 

tf-50 

HAY, STRAW, CORN— Delivered in 
quantities of one ton or more. 
Phone Ind. 6427. Russell Klein, 
Morning View, Ky. 3t-l* 



PLUMBING & HEATING— Repairs or 
new installations, furnace clean- 
ing and service on stokers, gas or 
oil furnaces. Tri-County Heating 
and Plumbing Co., Florence 593. 

tf-49 



FOR SALE— Baled hay, first, second 
and third cutting alfalfa, priced 
right for quick sale. Duckhead 
Inn. Walton, Ky., Route 2. Phone 
Walton 288. 3t-2* 



WANTED — Someone to raise nine- 
tenths acre of tobacco on shares 
or money rent, on the J. W. Step- 
henson farm; also some fence to 
be built. Call at 74 South Main St., 
Walton. Erma Stockman. 2t-l* 



SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if order- 
ed before January 1. For prices 
and information, call A. R. Kwo- 
zalla, Erlanger, Ky., Route 4. Fl. 
593. tf-49 



FOR SALE — Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 85r> Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. . tf-1 



FOR SALE — Purebred Duroc boar 
hog. P. J. Maddin, Walton, Route 
2. Phone Walton 271. 2t-51 



FOR RENT— JCash or shares; 101-acre 
farm, located off Richardson Pike, 
Kenton county; 4% acres alfalfa, 

■ other meadow, and cropland; good 
ipasture; small tobacco allotment; 
good 4- room house; available Jan- 
uary. Inquire Riley's Store, Rich 
ardson Pdke. 3t-51* 



FOR SALE— Judson field metal rol- 
ler, 9 feet wide, never used; come 
make me an offer. Rosegate Farm, 
Dixie Highway. 2t-l* 



I 



ARTIFICIAL*. BREEDING — It works, 
it (pays, it gets calves. Sign up in 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay- 
lor, Walton 582. tf-45 



Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued on Page 7) 



FOR SALEr-Ba^fc beef, suif< , *# for 
locker or deep freeze; will sell 
whole or by quarters; also pigs. 
Ira Stephenson, Walton-Nicholson 
Road. Phone Ind. $742. 4t-2* 



W 



FOR SALE— -Looking for appliances, 
such as Refrigerators, Washers, 
Deep Freeze, Heaters, Radios, used 
or new, call Independence 6585. 
Myron Stephens. 40t-47* 



FOR RENT — 4 room apartment on 
South Main. 98 South Main, Wal- 
ton. 2t— 51* 



FOR SALE— Beautiful all white Phil- 
gas stove; also Philgas water heat- 
er, and room heater. Rosegate 
Farm, Dixie Highway. 2t-l* 



BARGAIN, N^w Spinet Piano— Why 
buy anj^anknown make, second 
hand^ipdano from an unknown 
party, when Kentucky's greatest 
music store offers you a new, 
standaird brand piano, free service 
and Sbackleton's guarantee, all 
for the same price? Special, from 
now until Chjiistmas, os as long 
as they last, we axe offering to the 
readers of this advertisement: the 
reliable Standard Brand New 
Cable Spinet Piano for only $595, 
on terms less than rent, $4.00 
weekly. Phone ( reversing charges 
for full information) or write us 
for illustrated catalog ait. once. 
The quantity of pianos is (Limited. 
SHACKLETON PIANO CO., 621 
South Fourth Street, Louisville 2, 
Kentucky. •**■.' 9t-43 

_£_ 



USEOCH 



1941 Olds 4-Door 
1941 Pontiac 2-Door 
1939 Pontiac 4-Door 
1 938 Chevrolet 4-Door 
1937 Chevrolet T-Door 



1 935 Plymouth Coupe 
Used Trucks — 

1939Chev r . 1^2 ton dump 
1939 White 2Y 2 . ton dump 
1946G. M. C. 2 ton 



-Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 



Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. 5004 



■p i i - 3 



Also Cooking, 
Water Heating 
and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, Ky 




*#?* 



<X_*^ _ 



$jfc*w 



WALT 





— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY — BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



X£ 




WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY J*, 1950 



Volume 35 - Number 3 



Burley Prices Drop; 
Some Grades Off $5 



Volume Heaviest 
Of Current Season 



During the sixth week of sales for 
Burley tobacco average prices for a 
large number of grades showed de- 
clines. According to the Federal - 
State Market News Service, losses 
were as much as $5.00 as compared 
with averages for" the week before 
but, most were $1.00 to $3.00. Vol 
ume of offerings was the heaviest 
for any week this season. Gross sales 
for the period ending January 13th 
amounted to 95,616,748 pounds for 
an average of $44.55. The over-all 
average was $3.14 less than for the 
three days making up the previous 
week. Season gross sales were 
brought to 480,324,690 pounds for 
$46.22 iper hundred. The season's 
average was reduced 42 cents from 
that reported last week. 

Losses were general. Some bet- 
ter grades of flyings and lugs were 
unchanged but these were offered in 
relatively small volume. The num- 
ber of grades displaying slight gains 
was negligible. 

The general quality of the tobac- 
co was also lower. There was an 
increase in the proportion of low 
quality leaf, tips and nondescript. 
Most sales consisted of baskets con- 
taining fair and low grades of all 
groups, . good flyings and nonde- 
script. 

Receipts of the Associations, un- 
der the Government loan program, 
showed a sharp Increase this week. 
It was estimated that in the area as 
a whole around 7 percent of the bas- 
kets were pooled. Season receipts, 
through January 6, amounted to 
slightly over 15.4 million pounds or 
about 4 percent of grass sales thru 
that date. 

Final sales were held on the fol- 
lowing markets: Carthage, Fayette- 
ville, Hartsville, Mb-Pleasant and 
Sparta, Tenn., and Pennington. Gap, 
Va. The following markets have of- 
ficially announced their closing 
dates: Scottsville, Ky., Jan. 18; Ltb- 
anon and Springfield, Ky., Jan. 19; 
Gallatin, Tenn., Jan. 17; Sweetwater, 
Tenn., Jan. 18; Franklin and Spring- 
field, Tenn., Jan. 20. Other markets 
will close next week but official an- 
nouncements have not been made. 

Fire Department Social 

The 'Ladies Auxiliary of the Flor- 
ence Volunteer Fire Department an- 
nounce their monthly Pillow Slip 
Bingo social to be held at the Fire 
Hall and Community Center, Thurs- 
day evening, January 19, 1959 at 8 
p. m., given for the benefit of the 
Community Center building fund. 
A very special invitation is extend- 
ed to the general public to attend, 
There will be a free coyer- all game 
at 8 p. m., followed by 30 straight 
line games. During the course of 
the evening there will be two spec- 
ial .cover- all games with attractive 
prizes. (Mrs. Bessie Zimmer, Mrs. 
Clara Scott and Mrs. Virginia Harris 
are serving on the committee as an- 
nounced by Mrs. Lewis Houston, the 
Auxiliary president. ^ 

Hickory Grove W. M. S. 

Mrs. C. W. Carter was hostess to 
the W. M. S. of Hickory Grave Bap- 
tist Church, Tuesday evening at her 
home on the LLL Highway at Nich- 
olson. . <; 

Mrs. Carter conducted .the busin- 
ess session; Mrs. N. Orsborn gave tihe 
devotional, after which the meeting 
was turned over to the program 
chairman, Mrs. W. E. Durr, the sub- 
ject being, "Advance In 1950." 

Among those present were Mrs. 
Paul Staley, Mrs. W. H. Summey, 
Mrs. S. W. Durr, Mrs. W. E. Durr, 
Mrs. W. Maddox, Mrs. F. Popp, Mrs. 
N. Orsborn, C. W. jCarter, and the 
pastor, Rev. N. Orsborn. 



MRS. ETHEI*M. BROWN 

* Services were held in Chambers 
and Grubbs funeral home, Walton, 
Friday at 2 p. m. for Mrs. Ethel M. 
Brown, 34, a former resident of this 
county, who died last Wednesday at 
her home in Miamisburg, Ohio. Bur- 
ial was in Hughes Chapel Cemetery, 
Beaver. 

Mrs. Brown is survived by her hus- 
band, Russell Brown; a daughter, 
Verna Christine Brown; her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Davis, Centerville, 
Ohio, and three brothers, Clifford 
and Raymond Davis, both of Dayton, 
Ohio, and Bradford Davis, Honolulu. 

Mrs. Stella Mae Willis 

Services were held Monday from 
the First Baptist Church, Dayton, Ky. 
for Mrs. Stella Mae Willis, 34, who 
died Saturday following a long ill- 
ness. Her pastor, Rev. W. R. Cole, 
was the officiating minister. Mrs. 
Willis, who was a resident of Day- 
ton, leaves her husband, Allen Wil- 
lis, a daughter Allene, two sons Ron- 
nie and Michael Willis, all at home, 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie 
Rose of Florence, and two brothers, 
Lawrence and Albert Rose of Day- 
ton. Arrangements were in charge 
of the Stith funeral home, Florence. 
Interment was in Hopeful Cemetery 
beneath a profusion of beautiful 
flowers. Sympathy of the commun- 
ity goes out to the family in their 
sorrow. 



Kenton County Farm Bureau 

To Hold Annual Meeting 

Kenton County farmers will hold 
their thirtieth annual Farm Bureau 
meeting at the Independence Court 
House, Monday, January 23 at 1:30 
p. m. S. W. Durr, president, will call 
the meeting to order and following 
the business reports, officers and di- 
rectors for 1950 will be elected. 

Representative from the State 
Farm Bureau Federation, Louisville, 
is scheduled to tell the farmers about 
the Kentucky Blue Cross plan and 
Farm Bureau insurance programs 
for members, during January of this 
year, and Farm Bureau program. 

The Agricultural Outlook fr 1950 
will be discussed at the meeting by 
Extension Service representatives. 



CHARLES A. VOLAND 

Thefuneral of Charles A. Voland, 
Flskburg, was held at 8:30 a. m., 
Tuesday from the Chambers and 
Grubbs funeral home, Walton, with 
Requiem High Mass at 9:00 a. m. 
at St. Mary Church, Morning View. 
Burial was in the church cemetery. 

Mr. Voland, a retired farmer, died 
at his home Sunday. He. was 84 
years old. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Grace Zimmerman Voland; five dau- 
ghters, Mrs. Harry Reinart, Mel- 
bourne, Mrs. William Neidhausen, 
Cheviot, Ohio, Mrs. Anna Gosney, 
Newport, and Mrs. Harry Judd and 
Miss Anna Voland, Cincinnati. 

Masonic Call Meeting 

Eugene Sizemore, Worthy Master 
of Walton Lodge, 719, F. & A. M., has 
called a' meeting of the order for 
Thursday, January 19th, and all 
members are requested to be pres- 
ent. 



Farmers In Dudley 
Pike Community 
Study Problems 



Farmers in the Dudley Pike and 
Standfordtown section of Kenton co- 
unty met at the farm of Leonard 
List, Turkeyfoot Road, Friday, Jan. 
13th to study farm problems for '50. 

County Agent C. A. Wicklund us- 
ed charts to ifllustrate the importance 
of hay crops and pasture improve- 
ments wor livestick. Projects to be 
studied and put into practice during 
1950 have to do with alfalfa, fertiliz- 
ing, use of lime, phosphate and pot : i 
ash, seeding of brome grass in alf- 
alfa. Pasture improvement through 
use of improved seeding practices 
and use of limestone, phosphate and 
fertilizers, rotation and clipping of 
pastures. 

The following leaders are cooper- 
ating in the program: Leonard List, 
Joe Kahman, Albert List, Jr., Joe 
Rahman, Jr., Paul Kahman and Car- 
roll Merriman. 

Soil testing work will also be tak- 
en up during the year. Field meet- 
ings are planned at local farms. 

Plans are being made for attend- 
ance to Farm and Home convention 
in Lexington, Jan. 31 through Feb. 3 
by some of the farmers. 



Bearcats Defeat Hazard Bulldogs 
Friday 43-41; Trounce Hebron 



Last Rites For 
J. S. Thornton 
Sunday Afternoon , 



Funeral services were held in the 
Walton Baptist Church, on Sunday, 
January 15th at 2:30 p. m. for Jesse 
S. Thornton, 69, Walton, tobacco in- 
spector for the Federal Government, 
who died last Friday in St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital, Covington, from in- 
juries received New Year's Day near 
Oneida, Tenn., in an auto accident. 

His widow, Mrs. Lacy Collins 
Thornton, is still confined to the 
Covington hospital with^serious in- 
juries from the same accident. 

Mr. Thornton had resided in Wal- 
ton for 30 years and well well known 
in this section. He was a member 
of the Jonesville Masonic Lodge. 

Last rites were conducted by Rev. 
R. F. DeMoisey, Walton, assisted by 
Rev. C. G. Dearing, Erlanger, and 
Rev. 'B. C. Garrett, Walton. Music 
was supplied by a choir, and the 
casket-bearers were Ward R. Rice, J. 
B. Johnson, E. W. Kendall, Marvin 
Kendall, Daniel J. Roberts and R. 
M. Hall. 

Besides his widow, Mr. Thornton 
is survived by a son, Jesse William 
Thornton, and a daughter, Mrs. 
James Vest, both of Walton, and 
three brothers, David, Cull^and Ed- 
ward Thornton, all of Owen county. 
He also leaves two grandchildren, 
James Thornton "Dike" Vest and 
Candace Thornton. 

Burial was in the Walton Ceme- 
tery, directed by the Chambers and 
Grubbs funeral home, Walton. 



JOHNNY M. POOLE 

Johnny Marcus Poole, age 18, of 
Verona, Route 1, died at his home 
January 13th. Young Poole was a 
member of St. Patrick Church, Ve- 
rona. 

He is survived by his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. W. Poole; four brothers, 
Joe, Lawrence, Tony and Bobby 
Poole, all of Verona; six sisters, Mrs. 
W. C. Acra, Rabbit Hash, Mrs. Joe 
Black, Union, Mrs. W. S. Bowen, Cov- 
ington, Mrs. Thomas Ryan, Beaver 
Lick, Mrs. Bernard Ryan, Verona, 
and Miss Loretta Poole, Verona. 

Funeral services were held at 10 
a. m., Monday, Jan. 16 in St. Patrick 
Church, Verona, with Rev. Poole of 
Richmond, officiating. Burial was 
in the church cemetery. 

Hamilton funeral home, Verona, 
completed arrangements. 



Fifth District Gets 
$17,872 To Aid 
In Polio Fight 



Hazard Was Rated 
10th in" State 



CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to express our deep ap- 
preciation, for the many kindnesses 
extended us in our bereavement. 
' Especially do we wish to thank 
Rev. R. F. DeMoisey, Rev. B. C. Gar- 
rett, Rev. C. G. Dearing, the choir, 
the pallbearers, flower donors, and 
Chambers & Grubbs. 

MRS. JESSE THORNTON, 
JESSE W. THORNTON, 
MRS. JAMES VEST. 




Mr. and Mrs. Carl Alexander 



Now residing in Union are Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Alexander, whose marriage 
took place December 10th at the 
Riohwood Presbyterian Church. The 
bride is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence Sturgeon of Walton, 
and her husband Is the son of Mrs. 
Atlas Alexander, Union. Rev. Don 
Hopkins performed the ceremony. 

The church was decorated with 
evergreen and Jloral sprays of white 
gladiolas, and candleabras used at 
the altaT. Solos were sung by Miss 
Mary Knox with Mrs. S. D. S. Ranson 
at the organ. .. ■ i . .."■■ - 

The groom had as best man, Don 
AJexander, and as ushers, Harold 
Marsh and Jack Alexander. Sandra 
Alexander was flower girl and Dan- 



» 

ny Cdppage ring bearer. 

Gowned alike in blue satin with 
matching bonnets and carrying red 
roses, the brides attendants were 
Mrs. Ruth Glenn, matron or honor, 
and bridesmaids, Mrs. AUie Mae 
Love and Miss Eunice Rhodes. 

The bride was given in marriage 
by her father, and wore a gown of 
white satin with yoke of lace, wide 
bertha over the shoulders and a long 
train. Her fingertip veil was held 
with a seeded pearl tiarro. She car- 
ried white foses and white chrys- 
anthemums with en Inserted corsage 
of white-orchids. 

A reception was held in the church 
community house Immediately fol- 
lowing the ceremony. 



CHARLES J. FARRIS 

Services were held in the Dry 
Ridge Baptist Church for Charles J. 
Farris, age 27, who passed away on 
January 6, 1950 at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. He had been in failing 
health since being operated on last 
February, but bore his pain without 
complaint. He was a member of 
the Dry Ridge Baptist Church, and 
was employed by the Ubiko Milling 
Co., St. Bernard, Ohio. 

He was (the beloved husband of 
Mrs. Jean Ford Farris, Walton, and 
son of Mr. and Mrs. William Farris, 
and brother of Mrs. Ralph Cummins 
and Hazel Farris, all of Dry Ridge. 
Casketbearers were his fellow work- 
men, where he was employed, and 
their wives were the flower girls. He 
was laid to rest in the new Hillcrest 
Cemetery by Harry Eckler of Dry 
Ridge. 

Kenton Vegetable Growers 
To Meet at Crescent Springs 

According to County Agent C. A. 
Wioklund, vegetable crop growers in 
the Crescent Springs community are 
scheduled to meet at the farm of 
Dan Krumpelman, Amsterdam and 
Crescent Springs road, Friday, Jan. 
20 at 1:30 p.m. 

John S. Gardner, Field Agent in 
Horticulture, College of Agriculture, 
will discuss new developments in 
vegetable crop production with the 
growers of commercial crops. The 
program for 1950 will be studied by 
the leaders. 

Baptist WMS to Meet 

The Baptist W. M. S. will meet at 
the church today (Thursday) at 11 
o'clock. Bring clothing for moun- 
tain children and adults. 

David Tanner Chairman of 
"March of Dimes" in Walton 

David L. Tanner, local Insurance 
Agent, has been named Chairman of 
the 'IMarch of Dimes" for Walton, 
it was announced by Ben F. Zimmer, 
Jr., Boone County Director. The goal 
for this county this year is $2,000. 
There is a greater need this year 
than ever before. There being some 
670 cases in Kentucky the past year. 
Boone County had two cases, both 
of which were cured as well as fin- 
anced by the Kentucky Chapter of 
the National Foundation for Polio. . 

Mr. Zimmer urged everyone to 
support Mr. Tanner in making this 
year a successful one. Any person 
who has not been contacted and 
wants to contribute, send contribu- 
tion to Mr. Tanner and a receipt will 
be send you by return mail. 



The nine counties in the Fifth Con- 
gressional District received $17,872 
to aid in their fight against polio in 
1949, Gabe B. Taylor, Greensburg, 
Kentucky chairman of the 1950 
March of Dimes, declared this week. 

Taylor said the District suffered 
76 cases of the disease. Among the 
nine district counties, Campbell was 
the hardest hit, with 47 cases, wh,ile 
Trimble county had no cases. 

In the entire state, $235,511.85 was 
spent on patient care, compared 
with $134,686.28 raised in 1949. 

Taylor released Tihe figures in his 
plea for increased funds to fight 
the disease in 1950 and declared: 

"The Kentucky Chapter required 
$128,800 in addition to the money 
realized from the 1949 March of 
Dimes to fight the disease last year 
and we dare not hope that the cost 
will be any less in 1950." 

Taylor said, the Kentucky Chapter 
will go into 1950 caring for more 
than 200 polio patients stricken in 
1949, in addition to the large num- 
ber that has accumulated through 
the years. 

Walton Homemakers 

Mrs. Ralph Carpenter was hostess 
to the Walton Homemakers, Friday, 
at her home on Bedinger Avenue, 
with Mrs. Daisy Jack as co-hostess. 
Twenty -two members answered roll 
call. (Mrs. Leo Flynn presided at 
the business session. Following the 
luncheon, Mrs. Wilma Winburn, the 
program chairman, had a quiz game. 
Mrs. Marie Penick read the 23rd 
Psalm, and Mrs. Pearl Bedinger lead 
in prayer. 

Present at the meeting was the 
new Home Demonstration Agent, 
Miss McClasky, who was welcomed 
into our club by the president, Mrs. 
Leo Flynn. 

The lesson on "How to Make Hats," 
was given by Mrs. Alice Flynn. 

Hopewell Circle Meets 

The Gladys Hopewell Circle met 
a*t the church January 12th— wife 
Mrs. Dora Pennington as hostess. 
Mrs. Charles Praither, president, 
presided over the business meeting. 



LEGION! 

POST 



On Friday, January 20, another 
square dance will 'be held at the 
Legion home. Patrons at the dance 
last week had a very enjoyable time, 
and we hope they will return to- 
morrow night, and bring their fri- 
ends. Music starts at 9:00 p. in. and 
will again be furnished by Freddie 
Fields and the Foolish Fellers. 

Don't forget the dance on Satur- 
day, January 28, 1950 for the bene- 
fit of the poilo fund. This dance, 
sponsored by Johnson -MoElroy Post, 
277, will also be held at the Legion 
home on Beaver Road. Let's all 
support this very worthy cause. Jack 
Cahill and his orchestha will furnish 
the music for your dancing and lis- 
tening pleasure. 

The next regular meeting of the 
American Legion will be held on 
Monday, January 23 at 8:00 p. m. 
Please attend!— Pub. Chr. ' 



Coach Charles Hayes and the local 
high school basketballers went to 
Southeastern Kentucky last weekend 
for a pair of gqmes. They played 
at Hazard, Friday night and at Hy- 
den, Saturday night. The Bearcats 
upset the dope bucket in the Friday 
fray by defeating Coach Homer Lee 
Osborn's Hazard Bulldogs 43-41, in 
a close game, throughout, but in the 
"bath night" tilt were defeated by 
the Leslie County boys 51-47. Here 
is what The Hazard Herald had to 
say of the Friday game: 

"A deliberate! smooth moving 
five from Walton bested the Hazard 
high school Bulldogs by two points 
last night, 43-41, at the Hazard high 
school gymnasium. 

"Except for Kay Greer, who led 
the Hazard attack with 22 points, 
the Hazard offense was kept at bay 
last night by the Walton five, as 
they themselves displayed a smooth 
and desceptive passing attack to 
work the ball into the basket. Wal- 
ton made very little use of the fast 
break. , 

"Kay Greer accounted for more 
than half of the Bulldogs' points as 
he hit 10 times from the field and 
added two foul tosses for the total 
22. Watson added nine points to 
the Bulldog cause. Greer carried the 
load, especially in the second half 
as he hit seven of his field goals. 

"It was a close game all the way 
with the score tied at the quarter 
and half. Walton had a one-point 
edge at the three-quarter mark. 
Little scoring was done in the initial 
period as each team scored but four 
points, and those not until the latter 
part of the period. 
HAZARD (41) FG 

Watson , 3 

Greer 10 

Wells _ __ 

Stidham 2 

Townes 

Barker 

Keffer 

Totals 15 

WALTON (43) FG 

Johnson 1 

Rice ,__ 

Maddox 1 

Meadows 

Vest 6 

Cleek 3 

Cheeseman 5 

Totals 16 

Saturday Night 

Saturday night at Hyden, the Les- 
lie countians led throughout, being 
in front 15-8 at the end of the first 
quarter; 22-14 at the half; 33-31 at 
the third quarter, and 51-47 as the 
game ended. McGee led the win- 
ners' attack with 21 markers, follow- 
ed by Hendrix with 15. For Walton, 
Ronnie Cleek was tops with 13 tal- 
lies, with Vest being close behind 
with 12. , 
Tuesday Night 

The Cats continued on their un- 
defeated way in the Boone County 
Conference, Tuesday night at the 
home gym, when they had little 
difficulty in downing Hebron 69-46 
before a small crowd. The winners 
were in front throughout, quarter 
scores being 27-11, 38-20 and 54-30. 
HEBRON (46) FG FT PF TP 

Herbstreit 4 

Bowman 

J. Tanner 

McGlasson 5 

Abdon 

Hogan _ 4 

Totals 13 

WALTON (69) FG 

Rice 6 • 

Johnson 1 

Cleek 2 

Ryan 4 

Maddox _________ 4 

Vest 8 

Meadows 2 

Cheesman 2 

Glacken 

Totals _ 29 

Friday Night 

On Friday night, January 20th, 
the Bearcats go to Independence to 
play the Simon Kenton Pioneere — 
and a red-hot ban, game is expected. 
In their first meeting, here, Walton 
won 52-41. 

Next Tuesday 

On Tuesday night, Jan. 24th the 
Cats will be hosts to the Bellevue 
Tigers at the Walton gym. 



FT 


PF 


TP 


3 


2 


9 


2 


3 


22 





1 





2 


1 


6 


1 


4 


1 


3 





3 











11 


11 


41 


FT 


PF 


TP 


1 


5 


3 














5 


2 


3 


2 


3 


4 


1 


16 


2 


4 


8 


1 


2 


11 


11 


19 


43 



10 


1 


18 





2 


_0 


1 


3 


1 


7 


4 


17 


2 


1 


2 








8 


20 


11 


46 


FT 


PF 


TP 


4 


5 


16 





3 


2 





4 


4 





2 


8 


2 


3 


10 


1 


4 


17 


1 


3 


5 


3 


1 


7 





1 





11 


26 


69 



\ -a 



Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January t6, 1 950 






WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 



Entered as Second Class Matter 

January 1, 1.916 at the Post 

Office at Walton, Ky. 



Mark M. Meadows *> 
Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

$1.50 PER TEAR 
(In Advance) 



MEMBER 

KENTUCKY PRES! 
A SSOCIATION , 

OICAHI'tD JAHUAIt, intt 



COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKT 

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS 

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Department of Highways at its of- 
fice, Frankfort, Kentucky, until 10:00 
A. M., Central Standard Time, on the 
27th day of January, 1950, at which 
time bids will be publicly opened 
and read for the improvement of: 
SP GROUP 14A (1950) » 



"Mileage shown in these groups 
indicates approximate distance to be 
surfaced and not necessarily the dis- 
tance between beginnings and end 
points shown in descriptions. 

Boone County, SP 8-90— The Flor- 
ence-Warsaw Road from Jet. 25 aqd 
42 in Florence to & W. C. L. of Flor- 
ence, 0.280 miles. Class I Mix, 190 
tons. . 

Boone County, SP 8-90— The Flor- 
ence-Warsaw Road from S. W. C. L. 
of Florence to Galatin County Line, 
10.278 miles. Class I Mix, 11,920 tons. 

Gallatin County, SP 39-13 — The 
Wardfcw- Florence Road from E. C. L. 
of Warsaw to Boone County Line, 
5.298 miles. Class I Mix, 6730 tons. 

Boone County, SP 8-10— The Lex- 
ington-Cincinnati Road from US 42 
near N. E. C. L. of Florence to US 42 
near S. W. C. L. of Florence, 0.510 
miles. Class I 'Mix, 345 tons. \ 

Gallatin County, SP 39-93— The 
Warsaw-Carrollton Road from E. C. 
L. of Ghent to Gallatin County Line, 
0.996 mile. Class I Mix, 765 tons. 

Boone County, RS 8-150— The North 

Bend Road (from KY 20 at Hebron to 

JKY 298, .3% miles south of Taylors - 

(port, 5.441 miles. Reconstruction 

and traffic bound surface. 

Boone County, iRS 8-390 — The 
Hopeful Road from KY 18, approx- 
imately 1-mile west of Florence, 
southerly to US 42, 2.16 miles. Re- 
construction and traffic bound sur- 
face. 

The attention of prospective bid- 
ders is called to the prequalifica- 
tion requirements, and necessity for 
securing certificate of eligibility, the 
special provisions covering sublett- 
ing or assigning the contract and 
the Department's regulation which 
prohibits the .issuance of proposals 
after 4,:30 P. M. on the day preceding 
the opening of bids. 

NOTE: A purchase charge of $10 
will be made for each proposal. Re- 



mittance must accompany requests 
for the proposal forms. Refunds will 
not be made for any reason. 

Further information, bidding pro- 
posals, et etera, will be furnished 
upon application to the Frankfort 
Office. The right is reserved to re- 
ject any and all bids. 

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS 
Frankfort, Kentucky 
January 5, 1950. 2t-2 



JJND 



INDEPENDENCE 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 
Phone HEmlock 2458 



Richard McKinley moved last 
week from our village to the La- 
tonia Terrace Apartments and will 
enter business college in Cincinnati. 

Mr.sand Mrs. James Reed of Wal- 
ton are moving back to Indepen- 
dence, and will occupy the apart- 
ment vacated by the McKinleys. 

The funeral of Mrs. Walter Mof- 
fett was held last Wednesday in the 
Baptist Church of our community. 
It was a very large funeral with 
flowers in abundance. This com- 
munity extends it's sympathy to the 
family. 

Sandford Lee Roberts is very sick 
in the hospital. 

Mrs. Wiley Sims has been bedfast 
again. 

Mrs. Nan jBagby is still very sick. 

The Men's Brotherhood of the In- 
dependence Baptist Church is plan- 
ning an interesting program of spec- 
ial mhusic and speaking, with eats 
at 7:00 p. m. r Thursday, January 26. 
The members will bring a covered 
dish. Visitors are welcome. 




RAY HALL 



i 

Manufacturing Optician 

Doctor's Optical Prescriptions i 
Accurately Filled, Broken 
Lenses Replaced. Expert I 
Optical Repairing 

122 PIKE ST. COVINGTON 
HEmlock 1992 



AUCTION 

Saturday, Jan. 21 

10:00 A.M. 

We have contracted with Bradford & Worthington to sell at auction, on the above 
date, located on State Route 16, . - . . 

2 Miles South of Verona, Ky. 

The following described property: Team and harness, extra good; 2 brood 
sows, to farrow in February; 12 s'hoats, weigh about 100 lbs. each; 1 McCormick- 
Deering No. 9 mowing machine ; 1 hay rake; 1 wagon and box bed; 1 sled; 1 disc 
harrow; 1 turning plow, si eel beam ; 1 corn drill with fertilizer attachment ; 1 Dixie 
plow; 1 five-shovel plow; 1 set of stretchers; 2 doubletrees and singletrees; 1 corn 
scoop; 1 hay fork; 1 tobacco setter; 1 three-row marker; I twenty-gallon kettle; 
1 scalding box; 1 neck* yoke; 2 milk pails; 1 sprinkler; 2 chairs. 

FEED — 100 bushels of corn, and 5 stacks of hay. 

Terms Cash 

J. R. WORTHINGTON & B. W. SPAULDING, Owners 

i, a 

BRADFORD AUCTION CO. 

Florence, Kentucky Phone Walton 671 or Florence 229 

Auctioneers: Bradford & Worthington 
Sales Manager: Lucian Bradford 



James A. Ring, after an operation, 
is back at work again. 

George Evans, former resident of 
Independence, reports that now the 
rabbit hunting season is over he has 
a double barrel shotgun and two 
dogs for sale, but Jesse Gadd says 
that he is now beginning to get good 
and ready for next year. 

Mrs. C. S. Snelson left Sunday for 
Memphis, Tenn., where she will re- 
ceive clinical treatment. 

Congratulations to Rivard Ellis 
Ellis and Ellen Nelson, who were 
married after the services Sunday 
in the Independence Baptist Church 
by .the pastor, Rev. W. E. Maners. 
This fine young couple plan to make 
their home in Covington. 

J. Deffendoll of Independence was 
taken to Lakeland, Monday because 
of insanity and thus becoming uri 
manageable for the family. He was 
put in the hospital in Covington but 
th eycould not take care of such a 
case. 

In Harrison county, 288 pieces of 
old furniture are being recondition- 
ed and refinished by homemakers. 

The Larue county 4-H club assoc- 
iation bought 29 registered Jersey 
heifers in Michigan for 4-H club 
members. 



J 



— new — 



S 



ame 

THEATER 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 



One Show Each Night - 7:30 p. m. 
Sunday Matinee - 2:30 p. m. 



FRI. & SAT. 



JAN. 20 ■ 21 



Stan LAUREL - Oliver HARDY 

"BLOCKHEADS" ■* 

— Plus Second Feature- 
Robert Armstrong - Mae Clarke 

"STREETS OF 
SAN FRANCISCO" 



SUN. & MON. * JAN. 22-23 

Bob HOPE - Ducille BALL 
—in— ' 

"SORROWFUL JONES" 



% 



TUE. & WED. * '■ JAN. 24 • 25 

Hedy Lamarr - Robert Cummings 

— in— 

"LET'S LIVE A LITTLE" 

THURSDAY • JANUARY 26 
Kirstine Miller - Arthur Franz 

"JUNGLE PATROL" 

» —Bargain Night — 



For the Best In Heating 
J arman Heating Service 

WALTON ... 524 or 921 
Engineered Heating— Coal, OIL 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



DIAMOND 
VALUE . . . 



! 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- ■ 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- ! 
pression of love and ! 
admiration. 



Come to Motch's for i 
diamonds of carefully i 
selected quality and i 
priced in strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
ence in this one loca- 
tion is your assurance 
of getting dollar for 
dollar value, in your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 
Monthly Payments I 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



HENRY'S BOOTERY 

SHOES ... For the Entire Family . . . SHOES 

Next to Kroger Super Market - Erlanger, Ky. 

— -SHOP HERE & SAVE 

RED GOOSE SHOES RUBBER FOOTWEAR 

MEN'S GOOD WORK SHOES 

SPECIAL! Rayon Stockings 35c pr., 3 for $1.00 



FOR SALE 

Wed., Feb. 1st 

AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON 

At Williamstown Stock Yards 

WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. 

Tractors and Tractor Plows and Discs; Grain Binders 
and Manure Spreaders; Corn Binders — A Complete 
Line of All Kinds of Farm Implements.. 

J. L. MOODY 



Maytag! $20? 

For Your Old Washer; No Down Payment; 1 Yr. to Pay 

Of course you can 
afford a M&tjtaq/ 





Now — a genuine Maytag at these easy-on-the-budget prices I 
Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
faction with the rugged, dependable Maytag! 

Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
onstration. 



,**? 





THE MAYTAG CHIEFTAIN. A gen- THE MAYTAO COMMANDER 

nine Maytag, yet priced within a Big, square porcelain tub. Gyra- 

fow dollars of the lowest- tmri - oc foam action washes *■ « «ric 

cost washers on the $17*195 extra fast, extra VIAA'-* 



market. 



clean. 



HAGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 



New Model DODGE Truck 

J/2 Ton Pickup, with the new steering wheel shift, 

now delivered at your door for $1,390.00. _ 

Other Models off— V 2 , &, 1, 1*. 2, 2*. 3 Ton 

^Priced Accordingly 

Now On Display at Your . . . 

DODGE-PLYMOUTH & DODGE TRUCK DEALER 

COVINGTON AUTO SALES, Inc. 

HE 1722 24 EAST Sth STREET HE 1723 

Between Scott and Madison 
Dodge & Plymouth Cars - Dodge Job-Rated Trucks 



mm 



o 



I* 



Thursday, January 1 9, 1 950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Three 



I 
I 

I 




WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C.. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. ___ 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Fred S. Nichols, Pastor 
Frank Penlck, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m'. 

ST. PATRICK CHURCH, VERONA 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
5th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

ALL SAINTS MISSION. WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
4th Sunday of month — 8:30 a. m. 
5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 
J. E. Percy, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service „ 11:00 a. m, 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m, 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. ___ 8:00 p. m. 
Cottage Prayer Meet.; Fri. 8:00 p. m. 

— Services Every Sunday — 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service » 8:00 p. jm. 

(First and Third Sundays) 




8y PR. KENNETH J, FOREMAN 



SCRIPTURE: AcU 8:1—8:4. 
DEVOTIONAL READING: I Peter If 
3-9. 



First to Fall 



Lesson for January 22, 1950 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 
J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Don SmiLCh, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

EvenlngService k 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 



INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed ___ 8:00 p. m. 

NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School *J± 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U i 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed ... 8:00 p, m. 



CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Walter Kidwell, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service __. 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 



CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor — Vernor F. Ldpscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt. — Harvey Hughes 

Sunday School . 10:30 a; m. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m. 



LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 



BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

(Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Services 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. ___ 7:30 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 

NERVOUSNESS . 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980 — 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Ray 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON' -:- KENTUCKY 



^ 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 




Whether it's 

clothes pins 

or savings 

SAFETY 

is of vital 
importance 



INVEST 
THE INSURED WAY 

FIRST FEDERAL K^ d 

501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINqTON, KY. 




•TROUBLE IN THE CHURCH can 
•*■ start anywhere. Sometimes it 
starts with the women. That was 
the way the early church found it. 
The experiment in fellowship which 
they tried ran into snags, for not 
even the first Christians were 
perfect. The 
churcn $&* Jerus- 
alem was in a 
sense inter -racial. 
Some were born 
and bred in Pales- 
tine, and there 
were others from 
the outside, with 
Greek names, 
speaking Greek as , 
their native tongue Dr - Forem «> 
— Hellenists they were called. There 
was argument: Were the Hellenist 
widows getting their share of the 
church's help? 

• • • 

Committee Chairman 

»PHE APOSTLES, being called on, 
■ refused to straighten the tangle 
themselves. Let the church elect a 
committee, they said. First on the 
list was a man named Stephen. He 
turned out to be most famous for 
being the first Christian martyr, 
but when he fell unconscious be- 
neath that shower of stones, there 
died no ordinary man. 

To begin with, he filled the 
bill as chairman of that Com- 
mittee on Grievances. Not 
many men, then or now, could 
fill all three qualifications the 
Apostles required: reputation, 
spirituality, and wisdom. 
It takes a very tactful man to 
settle a difficulty in which women 
are concerned; it takes tact to 
handle any committee; it takes 
tact to manage an inter-racial sit- 
uation; it calls for wisdom to handle 
funds. 

• • • 
Debater 

SOME MEN THINK themselves 
bigger than their jobs. Some 
men really are bigger, and Stephen 
was one of these. Tie spilled over, 
so to speak; he had even more en- 
ergy and ability than the job called 
for. We hear of him debating 
around the synagogue circuit par- 
ticularly in the synagogues which 
were used by Jews from other 
parts of the world. 

We have no details of those 
debates, but we know how they 
always came out; Stephen got 
the decision. We can guess, 
from his great speech in the 
hour of his death, what his gen- 
eral line must have been. 

Many Christians in Jerusalem at 
that time had little or no idea that 
Christianity was actually a new re- 
ligion; even the name "Christian" 
had not been thought of. They con- 
sidered it a form of the « Jewish 
religion. 

• • • 

Scholar 

STEPHEN'S SPEECH at his trial 
(Acts 7) may sound dull to 
some now, but it was not dull to 
the audience. No man makes a 
dull speech on the brink of death. 
Further, it was that speech that 
got him killed. His listeners may 
not have liked it, but they certain- 
ly did not think it dull I The beauty 
of the speech is that it reveals 
Stephen's keen insight into the re- 
ligious history of his people 

Speaking without notes, he 
reviews the history of close to 
2,000 years in a 10-minute 
talk, and yet brings out the 
main points. Only a real schol- 
ar can do that, a man who is 
both historian and prophet. 
The most important peaks in 
Israel's history were God's 
revelations to them; and 
Stephen shows that these revel- 
ations had never been tied to a 
house or a book. % 

No institutions and ho place is 
Indispensable to God. The same 
God who had wrought new things 
in the past had now wrought a new 
thing in Christ. 

• • • 

Martyr 

STEPHEN'S AUDIENCE was not 
, convinced. Seeing murder in 
their eyes, Stephen knew his time 
was short In a few stinging last 
words he reminded them that mur- 
der was an old story in that Tem- 
ple. They had killed prophets, they 
had killed Jesus the "Just One." 
And now—. Now they dragged 
Stephen out and stoned him till he 
iied.> 

Well, you can stop a voice 
but you cannot stop an idea. 
Stephen was first to fall, but 
not the last. To this very year 
Christ has bis martyrs, men 
and women who will die rather 
than deny him. 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



NEW BETHEL BAPTIST, VERONA 

Rev. R. F. DeMolsey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. ____ 7:30 p. m. 

-^Services Every ^Sunday — , 

WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Grover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMiUian, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morndng Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. __' 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship __„ 7:30 p. m. 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. m. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-Bible Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 



STAFFORDSBURG CHURCH 
Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School :__ 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship __: 7:45 p. m. 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 
Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 10:3d a. m. 



THE BEST PLACE 
to 



EAT 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 



WALTON, KY. 
Phone— 352 

FLORENCE, KY. 
Phone— 193 

Chambers & Grubbs 

FUNERAL HOMES 



WE APPRECIATE . . . 

When a family calls us in 
time of need, we feel deeply 
honored, for we believe that 
no public servant, and prop- 
erly so, is selected with as 
much care as *he funeral 
director. We appreciate the 
confidence so often placed 
in us. ~-T 



i nnggCT For A Rainy Day! 



Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as Jittle as $1.00! 

Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON, KY. 




DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday. 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 



£He liORG ARM OF CHG CHURCH 




The Church reaches far in touching the lives and 
hearts of men everywhere. Its arm it long. Its 
protection it tort. 

The Church it responsible for thousands of hospi- 
tals, colleges, and other service inttitntiont. Its 
missions extend into city slums and to the distant 
corners of the world. At an agent for the relief of 
suffering, promoting spiritual education, and contrib- 
uting to better living, it hat no equal. 

Can you afford not to have a part in what the 
Church it doing to tpread truth, promote good citiien- 
thip, stem the tide of juvenile delinquency, heal the 
tick, and minister to destitute peoples. 

No short-range view of the Church can do it justice, 
for each separate congregation it on* link in a vast 
chain of enterprises for human betterment- 
It it fine to have a part in such a project. It it a 
duty to one's family and to God to accept « part of 
this responsibility. 



1HE CHUBCH FOB Alt . . . 
Att FOB THE CHURCH 

The Church Is th. ar«<rto«t ioc- 

^L!l* arth ** •• huildinsfoi 
charocl*, cB d pood ^^ - , 

U a .ter.houw of .plritual ralu... 

dU^i^ ,troo ° Churcl >. »i«h« 
tSSS%^ «wK3tB can 
•«"£•. There or. lour eound 
~««- why .v.ry p.„on SSt 
J""**"*? r^rularly and . UJ > 
£ r rt *• Church. They are: (1) 

chlldr«,. ia k.. o, For the take 
oJJUj i community and nation. (4) 

£-*•*.. .John { '*» 

Thund.y. Luke 

J* 1 *"* Iiaiih 

Saturday ...Matthew 



• ll-M 

* J-10 



Copyright 1950, K. K. Keliter, Strubot. Vt. 



Linton's Barber Shop 

Walton, Kentucky 

Florence Deposit Bank 

Florence, Kentucky 

Walton Lumber Co. 
Phone Walton 19 

Hamilton and Jones 
Walton, Kentucky 

Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence, Kentucky 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 

Phone Walton 95 



Conrad Hardware 

For Service. Large or Small. See Powers 

Dixie State Bank 

Walton, Kentucky 

Meador's Grocery- 
Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables. Meats 

Walton & Readnour *. 

Cool • Feed - Seed Phone Walton 154 

Roberts Grocery 

Where You Get Quality and Price 

Community Public Service Co., Inc. 
Walton. Kentucky 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Stock-Reducing Sale 

MERCHANDISE REDUCED- 

Ladies' Better Dresses — 

$9.00 value, $6.95 . . . $6.95 value, $4.50 
Ladies' Corduroy Skirts — 

$4.50 value, $2.98 . . . $3.50 value, $2.50 
j House Dresses — 

!$3.39 value, $2.69 . . . $2.98 value, $2.25 . . . $1.50 
Children's Corduroy Suits— $4.29 value $3.00 

Boys' Caps $1.59 value, 79c ... 79c value, 59c 

69c Yard Goods ..1 _"_"'_ 50c - 50c value 39c 

Seersucker Housecoats 69c value, 50c 

Colored Outing 3 yards for $1.00 

Assorted Sizes and Styles — 

Blouses, Shoes, Slips, Sweaters, Robes 

—NO EXCHANGE ON THESE PURCHASES— 

Town & Country Shop 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

\ 1 1 ■ r ■ ■ ii ■■ tm ■ — ■ !■ ! ■ _ _ m M , , 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO WITH THE . . . NEW 

KENTUCKIANA 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

The Modern House with Uniform Light! 

Carrollton, Ky. 

TOBACCO SOLD ON SALE JANUARY 10, 1950: 

Lbs. Avg. 

Allen Rogers _■ 1686 $59.73 

Theodore Miller r ._ 2050 53.42 

Hubert Steingrubber 53.29 

William Burns '_'_ I 3096 54^0 

George Wernz 1656 53.00 

H. Brady and E. E. Klopp 508 51.59 

Klopp and Klopp __ 2122 52.00 

Charles Speagle ___„____ 3336 51.00 

Paul Chaney and L. Congleton 1552 53.73 

Charles Chambers j 57.83 

R. Kittle and Hubert Vimp I_ZI~ 1118 5L00 

E. Kippler and C. Shinkle 394 53*69 

H. Catlett and Billy Catlett 690 57^2 

C M. Waller and Bobby Turner i 1288 5L54 

Lehman Goodridge , ; g7(j 56*81 

Mary V. Gaines and Matt Griffith "_Z~ 1086 50 98 

Webster and Jones „ 1002 51 60 

A. Hensley a __i, 980 5187 

B. C. and B. W. Gaines and Willard Hodges 2484 55.26 
B. C. and B. W. Gaines and Edward Black 2566 56.97 
R. L. Vincent Exor. and R. demons _ _ _ 3128 56 72 

rv'—^V 1 -,n-; — 1882 56.S&- 

C H. and Russell Baker - 920 50 65 

Wm. Cox and John Wilson ___!__ 2092 5374 

Henry Siekman. J. Taggert and S. Allen __ 4300 52.38 

Anna Trisler and Ray Scroggin _. 2218 56 21 

Everett Oatman and E. Vantyle 2924 53^37 

«™ NA ™S OOK GENERAL MANAGER 

OTHA COOK __ FIELD AGENT 

J°f ?,Y£5 AN * DAVE gaines":::;; auctioneers 

SSSt&t 3 A ^» D WEIGHMAN 

HAROLD HEDGER BOOKKEEPER 



Quality Plumbing Fixtures 
Make Your Home Complete 

The color, charm and efficiency of thil bathroom provei that 
today's bathroom, whether new or remodeled, can be aa 
attractive and useful a* any room in your home. The Muter 
One-Piece Water Closet is sanitary, quiet, and thorough in 
action. The handsome Companion Lavatory has wide ledges, , 

rre bowl for convenience. Both are made of genuine vitreous 
a. Recess model Nfeo-Angle Bath, only 4 feet square, is 
roomv, comfortable. All three are available in white and many 
popular colors. A recessed Sunrad Radiator provides botn 
radiant and convected heat. 

Come in and see these smartly styled units and all the other 
quality products in the complete line of American-Standard 
Heating Equipment and Plumbing Fixtures. Buy now for 
modernization, using our convenient time payment plan. Come 
in or call for full detail*. 

A. & M. SUPPLY CO. 

106 East Fourth Street Covington, Ky. 

Phone — JUniper 3500 





1 STAFFORDSBURG 



We are sorry ,to report the ser- 
ious illness of Mrs. Lucille Webb, 
long a nurse but now a patient In 
Booth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Rapp left Sun- 
day morning for a two weeks *v*isit 
with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. TwenhofeJ, 
who are, making their home in Ma. 

His many friends are surprised to 



#» .. 



Thursday, January +6, J 950 




At one time or another moat of us be- 
come upset and jittery due to over- 
wrought nerves. This makes us irritable, 
restless and wakeful. You can't do your 
work well the next day, if you toes and 
tumble through the night and don't get 
the rest you need. At such times why 
not do as so many thousands have done 
for over sixty years — try 

Miles NERVINE 

Miles Nervine is a mild but effective 
sedative that helps soothe overwrought 
nerves and permits refreshing sleep. It 
has brought restful nights and peaceful 
days to thousands. Ask your druggist for 
genuine Miles Nervine. 
Have it on hand and be 
prepared next time tense 
nerves threaten to keep 
you awake or make you 
nervous. CAUTION, use 
only as directed. All drug 
stores have Miles Nervine. 



learn that Paul Keeney is in the* 
hospital in Hudson, N. Y., for surg- 
ery on an injured foot. 

A good number were out for ser- 
vices Sunday evening despite the 
hard rain. iAif~were glad to have 
Mrs. Wheary present, since she is 
kept so close at home by the illness 
of the daughter. 

Mrs. George Binder entertained a 
number of neighbors with a "Stan- 
ley party," Friday evening. 

Don't forget Sunday School every 
Sunday at 10 a. <m. We will also 
have preaching January 29, it being 
a fifth Sunday. Don't forget the 
Orphans' Home fifth Sunday collec- 
tion. 






FLORENCE 



—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



FOR SALE— Maytag electric washer 
and table-top kerosene range 
(white). Sell reasonably. Mrs. 
Lorena Myers, 8 High School a., 
Walton, Ky. it-3» 

YOU BREAK *EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger," Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. tf-46 



ifl.rvo.c.nl 

Tabloll, 

33c -73c 

Liquid Nftrvln* 

I 3 c$l. 00 




FOR SALE— Used, Model LA John 
Deere tractor, plow, cultivator and 
mower; Allis-Ohalmer "C" tractor, 
plows and cultivator. Butler Bros., 
Nicholson. Phone Ind. 5053. tf-49 



Friends of FIre~ChTeY Al Hue will 
be sorry to learn that he has been 
returned to St. Elizabeth Hospital for 
observation. Eacli and everyone in 
•the community wish him a speedy 
recovery. 

Robert Eastman, Jr. and William 
B. Shotwell have opened a radio re- 
pair shop and refrigeration service 
department in .the Renaker building, 
.recently vacated by the Post Office. 
We wish them success! 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Elkin and sons 
were Saturday evening guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Ay lor and dau- 
ghter of Lucas Apartments. 

Rev. H. L. Reid has made a rapid 
recovery following several weeks 
illness at his home. We are glad to 
see him up and about again. 

Mrs. Myrtle Hoffman, who is still 
on the sick list, is the guest of her 
son, Neville Hoffman and family of 
Sanders Drive. 

Mrs. Tom Carpenter is convalesc- 
ing at her home from several weeks 
illness. We wish her a quick re- 
covery. 



Mrs. Maggie Glacken is the guest 
of her daughter, Mrs. Elmer Carpen- 
ter and family of Mt. Zion Road. 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Aylor and 
sons of. Evergreen Drive, Route 42, 
were Sunday evening dinner guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Aylor and 
daughter Cynthia-. 

The ladies of St. Paul's serving 
on the committee for the monthly 
card party held the past week, wish 
to thank each and everyone who 
helped to make it a success. 

A vote of thanks is extended the 
members of the Florence Rotary 
Club for sponsoring the Community 
Christmas tree at the Fire House 
during the holidays. Splendid com- 
ments have poured in, not only from 
community members, hut from out- 
of-town visitors as well. 

Residents of this vicinity welcome 
iRay Dedier and family, who are now 
occupying their new home recently 
constructed on their property which 
was a part of the late W. R. Morris 
farm near Price Road. Mr. Dedier is 
the very courteous service manager 
for the Jos. A. Kuchle Co., Erlanger. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Mundy are the 
happy parents of a little daughter 
born January 4 at St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital. 




FOR SALE — Purebred Black Pole 
bull, 1 year old; 100 bales Timothy 
hay; also 1937 Plymouth 4-door 
sedan.' Russell Rector. Phone In- 
dependence 6148. 2t-3* 



"""NERVINE 



FOR SALE — 2 registered Guernsey 
heifers, excellent pedigree, 10 and 
15 .months old; sell or trade for 
building site. See at L.'M. Deuser, 
Staff ordsburg Road, Whites Tower. 

2t-2* 

™" . — f 

WANT TO BUY— Dead Stock; horses 
$2.50; cows $2.50; hogs 50c cwt, 
according to size and condition. 
Phone Walton, day 178, night 772, 
or Butler 6901. Griffin Fertilizer 
Co. tf-1 



MASTER MIX 

rA COMPUTE 

■MTTTfl'' CONCENTRATES 

STRAIGHT FEEDS 



Bring In 250 lbs. Corn and Mix with 100 lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig Starter at a low cost of only $3.15 per 100 lbs. 

Walton Feed Mill 




Incorporated 



WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 57 




^BEFORE YOU MAKf' ANY DECISION-LET US SHOW YOU THESE BEAUTIFULLY STYLED NEWtAifS 



COME SEE CHRYSLER'S 



New, New, 1950 Styling! 



t 




I 



There's beauty, beauty, beauty everywhere you 
look! And it's all brand-new beauty inside and out! 
Chrysler for 1950 is boldly and dramatically re-styled! 
Deliberately re-designed to be the Beauty Queen <&f the 
road, a classic of the long, low, and lovely. There are 
wonderful new nylon fabrics . . . smart new^trhnTMost oi 
all you'll be impressed by the fact that Chrysler's kind 
of beauty— unlike all others— truly reflects the sound 



engineering and the solid comfort and safety inside! The 
extra headroom, legroom, shoulder-room! The safer visi- 
bility! The chair-height seats! All the extra convenience 
of the easiest of all cars to enter and leave! See and drive 
this great car at your Chrysler dealer's today. It's the 
smartest, most comfortable car we ever built and the 
sweetest perfbnning with its wonderful Spitfire Engine 
with the completely Waterproof Ignition System. 



BEAUTIFUL 
1950 



CHRYSLER 



TODAY'S NEW 



STYLE CLASSIC 

WALTON GARAGE, Walton, Ky. 



11 



o 



I 



Thursday, January 19, 1950 




WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Mrs. Scott: Lancaster spent Friday 
in Cincinnati. 

•Mrs. J. T. Stone was the Thursday 
night guest of (Mt. and Mrs. Leo 
Flynn and (family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Stephenson 
were the last Wednesday guests of 
his sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. 
Brooks BeLl at Carrollton. * 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward Rice entertain- 
ed Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Carlisle and 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Stephenson at 
a luncheon recently. - 

G. O. Aabury and daughter of 
Maysville, were recent guests of 
Mrs. Lula Hudson. 

Misses Mollie and Anna Chapman 
left Saturday to spend the winter 
months in Cincinnati with relatives. 
Their address is 1701 Pleasant' St., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 



FARMS 

19 ACRES— 4-room house, new barn, 
on concrete road, Fiskburg. Ky. 

56 ACRES — 6-room house, barn, near 
Morning View, Ky. 

83 ACRES— 4-room house, bam, sell- 
ing to settle estate. 

— Others to Show — 

Harry F. Johnson 

Real Estate & Auctioneer 
PHONE IND. 6196 



Mr. and Mrs. Bobby DeMoisey and 
son have moved into the Crisler 
apartment on Higji Street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Flynn were the 
Saturday night guests of Miss Nell 
Englecamp at Latonia. 

Mr. and Mrs; Ken Weaver of Mad- 
isonville, Ohio, and Mr. and Mrs. W. 
O. Rouse were the Wednesday eve- 
ning dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
W. W. Rouse. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Sizemore 
and Miss Lena Kacaba were week- 
end guests of Mrs. Joe Sizemore in 
Dayrton, Ohio. 

Mrs. William Roberts and two 
children, Johnny v Sue and Larry, left 
last Thursday for a visit with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Brown 
of Booneville, Ark. 

Bobby Lancaster, along with sev- 
eral others appeared on radio station 
WZIP last Friday. 

David Ray Neumeister, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Neumeister, was taken 
to Childrehs Hospital, Cincinnati, 
last Thursday for 'an appendectomy. 
Mrs. Andrew Penn and Mr. and 
Mrs. Bruce Wallace attended the 
First Methodist Church in Coving- 
ton, last Sunday. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chapman of 
Verona were the Sunday guests of 
their daughter and husband, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lloyd Yates and daughter. 



Page Five 



Mrs. Bess Conrad, Mrs. Hope Vest, 
Mrs. Omer Powers, Mrs. Batta Con- ' 
rad, Mrs. Maude Wilson, Mrs. George 
Khott and Donna Joy Wright were 7 
recent guests of Mrs. Blanche Franks | 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Johnson, Jr., 
Guyolen Carlisle and Miss Bettiel 
Maloney were the Saturday night | 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Harry May- 
hugh of Elsmere. 



| BEAVER LICK 




Mr. and Mrs. David Tanner and 
I. M. Tanner were in Springfield, 
Ohio this weekend visiting Mary 
Jane and Joseph Tanner. 

Several from here attended the 
funeral of Ethel Mae Brown last 
Thursday, who passed away at her 
home in Ohio. Our deepest sympa- 
thy to her family and relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore and 
Harry Dale and Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Baker, Jr. and Bonnie and Ralphie 
were in Frankfort, Sunday. 

Miss Donna June Slayback enter- 
tained the young people Sunday 
night. Twenty-three were present. 

Gilbert "Gippy" Afterkirk spent 
the weekend with Willie Slayback 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Braitling of 
Louisville were weekend guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Slayback and 
family. 



TELEVISION! 

GENERAL ELECTRIC - PHILCO • EMERSON • ZENITH 
121/2-Inch Screen . . . Priced from S199.95 Up 

HOME FREEZERS— GENERAL ELECTRIC, PHILCO, VICTOR 
8 cu. ft. to 26 cu. f t. . . . prices from $249.50 Up 

"SEE GROSS & SAVE" 

R. W. Gross Appliances 

Dealer for G. E. and Philco Appliances 
Phone Ind. 5111 Independence, Ky. 



Florence 



Recent visitors in the home of the 
J. T. Stephensons were Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie Stephenson and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Stephenson of Owenton; Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Hogan of Hebron; Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Houston of Erlahger; 
Mrs. Ora Tanner and daughter Lu- 
cille and Mrs. Lilly Youell. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Keyer Were the 
weekend guests of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Eldridge Carpenter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Coyle 'of 
Ludlow were calling on the William 
Markesberys, Thursday evening. 

Mrs. Ora Tanner and daughters, 
Margurite and Lucille, entertained 
at dinner recently Mr. and Mrs. Ross 
Russ, Dr. Gladys Rouse and Mr. 
Rouse and Mr. and Mrs. Harve Tan- 
ner of Youell Road. 

Trooper R. R. Miller, stationed at 
Frankfort instead of Louisville, as 
we stated in our last issue. 

Miss Stella Carpenter of Covington 
was the guest of relatives here Sun- 
day. 




/FILLtV 
UULBS- 



tVERY SOCKET WITH RIGHT-SIZE LAMP 
AND ALWAYS KEEP A FEW SPARES ON HAND. 



AND/ 




LAMP bum cost so little and electricity rs so cheap that 
<* there's no need to be without plenty of good light where* 
ever it is wanted. ' • 

Stock up now on the lamp bulbs you need. We'll gladly 
recommend the right-size bulbs for every lamp and fixture 
in your home. .; 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

you* Qtiuullif ClocUio Company 



AUCTION 



2 Farms 



8 Acres - 103 Acres 



Having been appointed administrator of my mother's estate. Lilly Mae Lillard. I will offer for sale 
the following property, on 

Saturday, Jan. 28th 

10:00 A. M. (FAST TIME) 

TRACT NO. l-Consistlng of 8 acres. 300 feet off Highway No. 16. on Elliston Road, laying on the 
East side of Odd Fellows Cemetery at Napoleon. Ky. This ground is all level and a perfect location 
to build a home. 

«,ki!2 AC ^ NO# 2—Home P lace ' consisting of 103 acres, all in grass and hay except tobacco allotment 
#»»♦ Jf r ir "'Oft ne xt Year; a two-story frame house consisting of 9 rooms and hall, concrete 
h^L*! u u ^ cg ???*'' one feed barn 44x5 °- tobacco barn 40x44. corn crib, wash house, hen 
fSSSl « ! *' X in 900d condi «o«»- This farm has about 7 acres of alfalfa, nice orchard, 

fin ** n „j£ ^ r '.ri 0nS i stm 9. of , 3 P° nd8 ' <* cistern and creek; telephone line at the house, and electric 
G°encoe7 K: '* Highway 16 on Eagle Tunnell Road. 3 miles Northeast of 

k f IV o^ T ^ K "~ Sorrel horse, work anywhere, 12 years old; span mules. 4 and 5 years old. well 
Broke; Shorthorn and Hereford cow, 7 years old; Jersey and Shorthorn cow, 5 years old; Angus cow. 
4 years old; Hereford and Shorthorn, 4 years old; Angus and Shorthorn bull. 10 months old. All 
cows are pasture bred. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS— Rubber tired wagon, hay frame, like new; farm wagon, bed, hay frame; 
Avery 10-disc. good one; alfalfa rake; rounder plow; Syracuse hillside plow; Rastus plow; 2 double 
shovel plows; sheep rack; 2-horse tobacco setter; 2 sets work harness, like new; pitchforks, hoes, 
etc.; about 4 tons alfalfa hay. loose; about 80 bushels of corn. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— Bedroom suite, bed, dresser and chest of drawers; 2 studio couches, 
one like new; living room suite; dining room suitfe. table, buffet, 4 chairs; sewing machine; victro- 
la; dresser; wash stand; full size bed and springs; Vz-bed and springs; 3 rocking chairs; library 
table; 4 linoleum rugs. 9x12; wool rug. 9x12. and 2 hall runners; fern table; coffee table; end table; 
smoking stand; kitchen table. 4 chairs; gas stove; ice box; Norge philgas stove, like new; feather 
beds; 2 mattresses and pillows; 3 chenille bedspreads; Silvertone radio; Alladin lamp; 2 medicine 
cabinets; 2 Rayo lamps; drum stove and pipes; wash boiler; ironing board; laundry stove; iron 
Kettle; hot and cold jug; window screens; cooking utensils, dishes and other items too numerous to 
mention. 

TERMS ANNOUNCED DAY OF SALE1 LUNCH SERVED BY LADIES OF PAINT LICK CHURCHI 

W. E. LILLARD 

Administrator, Estate of Llllie Mae Lillard, Deceased' 
COL. CHARLES DUNCAN, AUCTIONEER 





PISTONS and SLEEVES 



Mean More Power.. .Save Oil and Fuel 



O Now's the time to let us put that like-new zip and 
power back into your tractor. A set of factory- 
matched IH pistons and sleeves will do the trick 
quicker and cheaper than anything we know. 

A new piston-and-sleeve job will soon pay for 
itself in the extra work you get done, in lower oper- 
ating costs and in slashed-down oil and fuel con- 
sumption. Besides, you'll have a tractor that's a 
pleasure to drive . . .runs clean and smooth ... digs 
into the toughest jobs with power to spare. 

Bring your tractor in for an engine checkup today. 
Our servicemen will give it their expert and un- 
hurried attention now and have it in tip-top shape 
fox the busy season. 



Let vs install IH Matched' Sets 

TODAY! 

Factory-matched 
IH pistons and 
.sleeves are made 
of a close-grained, 
extremely hard 
alloy that will take 
endless hours of 
punishment- They 
are ground to a 
precision fit and 
mirror-like finish 
for better com- 
pression and 
greater economy. 
You can't make a 
better investment. 




MLMIOFFER 

FOR THIS MONTH 

f-.t.,,, — -i.L, J nT i ■ ■ ii I 

■0*Wtf HPIIIhBU pDlMI Wmm 

sleeves lailaHi. far easy 



Calvin Cress & Sons 

Burlington, Ky. Phone 79 



c 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Waltqn, Kentucky 



Thursday, January +6, 1950 



GRANT 

WILLIAMS TOWN, KY 



MS 2020 



SATURDAY ONLY • JAN. 21 

2— ACTION HITSt-2 . 

hit no. 1 

GENE AUTRY— in 

"RIM OF THE CANYON" 

bit no. 2 

HOWARD DUFF— in 

"ILLEGAL ENTRY" 



2 DAYS . . . STARTING SUNDAY 

HUMPHREY BOG ART 
— in — 



"TOKYO JOE" 



TUE. & WED. • JAN. 24 ■ 25 




VAN 
JOHNSON, 
THE GOOD «r* 

SUMMERTIME" 

— •■ ricHNicoion 



THUR. & FRI. * JAN. 26 - 27 

2-^ACTION HITS— 2 

Hit No.' 1— Alan Curtis in 

"APACHE CHIEF" 

Hit No. 2 — Melvyn Douglas in 
"A WOMAN'S SECRET" 



Farms For Sale 

KENTON COUNTY— 141 acres; 5-room house, large combination 
barn (16 cow stanchions), milk house, shipping grade "A" milk, 
chicken house 20x20, smoke house with basement, also other 
outbuildings, 12 acres alfalfa, everlasting water, large orchard, 
tobacco base 1.9 acres, one-half tractor land; this is a good strong 
farm, will produce plenty of bluegrass; price $11,500. 

GRANT COUNTY— 136 acres, located on blacktop road; 7-room 
modern house, good combination barn and a number of good 
outbuildings, well watered; this farm will grow alfalfa and blue 
grass; has 12 acres alfalfa; tobacco base 2.2 acres; everlasting 
water; price $17,000; will also sell all tools and livestock sep- 
arately, if purchaser desires. I 

NEAR WALTON — Kenton county; 62 acres, 7-room house, part base- 
ment, combination barn, 12 cow stanchions, milk house, shopping 
grade "A" milk, double garage, chicken house, smoke house, 
brooder house, milk cooler, 6 milk cans, tobacco base 1.5 acres; 
price $11,000. - 

NEAR FLORENCE— 26 acres on State Highway; 8-room house, dairy 
barn with 20 stanchions, milk house and all necessary outbuild- 
ings, wonderful location, bus service, lot of road frontage; price 
$12,000. 

103 ACRES — 8 imiles from Florence; 5- room house, feed barn and 
tobacco barn; plenty of outbuildings; tobacco" base 2.4 acres; 
price $13,000. 

137 ACRES — Boone county, State Highway; 7-room modern house, 
new 4-room tenant house, large combination barn equipped for 
dairy, new milk house, good tobacco barn racked off, one other 
barn, stripping room, double garage with storage space, brooder 
buse, chicken house, 2 smoke houses, .corn crib; tobacco base 
2.6 acres; rhost all tractor land; this is a nice farm; price $25,000. 

146 ACRES — 7 miles from Florence, just off Route 42, on good road; 
good 5-room .house, combination barn fixed for dairy, milk house, 
plenty of outbuildings, three ponds; new base 1.9 acres; this is 
all tractor land; price $17,800. 

160 ACRES — Near Walton, on State Highway; dandy 7-room house 
with water; silo, dairy barn, milk house, tobacco barn, stripping 
room, new double garage, double corn crib, smoke house, brooder 
house, new laying house, mound cellar; tobacco base 2.2 acres; 
15 acres wheat, 15 acres alfalfa, 30 acres mixed hay, 6 acres 
timber, rest of farm tillable; 2 newly developed springs with 
concrete troughs, pond and small lake, 2 cisterns; price $26,500. 

137 ACRES — Located on State Road, 17 miles from Florence; 2 sets 
of buildings, equipped for dairy, all necessary outbuildings and 
plenty water; tobacco base 2.6 acres; price $10,500. 

84 ACRES — Near Verona; 7-room modern"Tlbuse, barn with nine 
. cow stanchions, milk house, nice outbuildings, all in grass but 
seven acres; base 2.1 acres; price $13,750. j 

80 ACRES— 12 miles from twon; 6-room house, barn, tool shed, four 
other outbuildings; all in grass but 5 acres; tobacco base 0.8 
acre; price $7,500. 

45 ACRES — 10 miles from Florence, on State Highway, bus service; 
4-room house, combination barn, new milking parlor, tobacco 
base 1.4 acres; price $6,000. 

38% ACRES— 8 miles from Florence, on State Highway; 6-room 
house, 2 barns, 145 fruit trees, tractor and equipment; price 
$10,800. 

FLORENCE— 4-room house and bath, modern kitchen with tile 
floor, hardwood floors, storm windows and doors, Venetian 
shades, (full basement, drive-in garage, gas furnace, city water, 
lot 60x200, close to bus; price $8,850. Loan can be transferred for 
$6,500 at 4% interest— -(payments will be between $40 and $45 
per month. 

R. P. COLEMAN 

' , : .. REAL, ESTATE & AUCTION SALES ' 

U. S. HIGHWAY 42 FLORENCE. KY. 

Phone: Florence 347 or 148 



1 SPARTA R. 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 MadUon Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



Mrs. Aggie Easton, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Woody and Mr. and Mrs. Her- 
bert Poe and children spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Henderson 
and children. 

Several from here attended the 
Fred Hale sale in Owen county, on 
Saturday. 

Sympathy is extended Reuben 
Poland in the death of his mother. 
Mrs. Poland was buried at Owen- 
ton, Wednesday of last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Heming- 
way and daughter spent the week- 
end with Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Hem- 
ingway. 

Let's all make an effort to attend 
theSunday School of our choice eaeh 
Sunday morning. 



Mrs. Anna Tandy is not so weld at 
this writing. 

Sorry to hear of ithe illness of Mrs. 
Hester Duncan. 



LITTLE SOUTH FORK 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baker and 
sons of Covington were Sunday din- 
ner guests of his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Baker and daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Boots and dau- 
ghter spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernes* Haddix of near Concord. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rea Scudder were the 
Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Scudder and children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Sutton and 
daughter called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Perry and family of near Bur- 
lington, Sunday afternoon. 



Mrs. Jhn perry is visiting her dau- 
ghter, Mrs. Catherine Sutton, and 
family. 

Rev. Joe Johnson was the Sunday 

guest of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Scudder 
and family. 



QUICK RELIEF FROM 

Symptoms of Distress Arising from 

STOMACH ULCERS 
due to EXCESS ACID 

FrooBookToRsofHomoTrutnienttlMt 

MastHtlp or It Will Cost Yon Nothing 

Over three million bottles of the Willabd 
Tsbatmbht hare been sold for relief of 
symptomsof distress arising from Stomach 
and Duodsnsl litem dne to bess* Add- 
Poar Pi—tun, Sour or Upwt Stomach, 
nasslwm. Heartburn, S l sspls u ns u . ate, 
doe to Excsss Add. Sold on 16 days' trial I 
Ask for "WMard's Msssags" which fully 
thai treatmen t Or— at 



R. C. Brakef ield. Druggist Walton 



DR. PAUL J. 

TABELIMG 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St, .Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 




Town of Walton Treasurer's Report For 1949 



Balance on hand January 1, 1949 _ _ „ 

Occupational Tax deposited ,_ ~_Z 

General Tax deposited : "~~~ ~„ 

Amourit received from R. Howard for loF 

Fines for 1948 ___! £ _~ _ 

Amout received from Walton Sales Barnfor street 
Deposit 

Disbursements: 

JANUARY— 



as'ment 



$ 737.54 

2,328.10 

5,954.94 

150.00 

. 245.00 

45.50 

594.00 



—.__.. $ 



Simpson & Johnson _i,* 

G. E. Groger _ _^_ 

Walton Waterworks 

R. C. Brakefield 

Guy St. Clair ~~T 

Gaines & Conner ~~~ 

Walton Lumber Co. 

Community Public Service Co. ,,.' . 

Community Public Service Co. Z 

Edith Stephenson 

James R. Allen ZZJZ~Z~ 

Herman Sirrfrnons _, ZJZ'JZJZ 

Edith Stephenson .. ~ 

FEBRUARY— 

James R. Allen \ 

Edith Stephenson _I "~ 

Herman Simmons ~_ 

Walton Advertiser _ mm 

Walton Waterworks ZZZZ 

Community Public Service Co. ZZ1Z.ZS 

Community Public Service Co. _ 

Simpson AWohnson . 

G. E. Groger .'._.. ,.„,_ 

Sammie Sanders I~_" 

MARCH— 

Herman Simmons , 

Edith Stephenson 

James R. Allen 

Noel Walton . ~ 

Walton Lumber Co. , 

Walton & Readnour 

Community Public Service Co. ____' Z 

Community Public Service Co. 

R. C. Durr ~_ 

Walton Waterworks Z 

G. E. Groger ___ ; — 

APRIL— 

Herman Simmons 

Edith Stephenson 

James R. Allen 

Herman -Simmons , 

G. E. Groger 

Edith Stephenson . i 

B. & M, Sales Co. - 

Conrad Hardware i 

Walton Lumber Co. , 

Walton Waterworks - ,_ 

Community Public Service Co. ; :__ 

Community Public Service Co. 

-Walton Advertiser 1* - 

MAY— 

Herman Simmons . 1 

James R. Allen 

Edith Stephenson . 

Walton Block Co. 

Sam Howard 

Herman Simmons, Jr. _. . 

Herman Simmons >__ 

Rouse Sign Service ; . 

Community Public Service Co. : __:__ 

Community Public Service Co. 

Walton Advertiser l 

Hamilton & Jones « 

Gaines & Conner : * . „ 

Walton Volunteer Fire Dept. 'L 

Walton Waterworks 

JUNE— 



Herman Simmons : 

Groger Express 

James R. Allen h, 

Edith Stephenson , °. 

Gaines & Conner , . 

Martin Foundry Co. 

Community Public Service Co. '.. 

Community Public Service Co. 

Walton Lumber Co. 

Walton Waterworks _1 

Kentucky Municipal League 

Conrad Hardware 

Walton Advertiser ', _i 

G. E. Groger £==be=u=: . . % -. 

W. E. Florence „.;_ 

Herman Simmons __ 

Herman Simmons, Jr. 

Russell Robinson 

R. C. (Durr i, 

JULY— 

Herman Simmons , 

James R. Allen 

Edith Stephenson 

Austin Scroggins 

Conrad Hardware 

Walton Waterworks _. 






26.80 
92.00 
83.34 

3.70 
11.00 
24.00 
32.95 

1.84 
100.80 

5.00 

10.00 

103.00 

20.00 

10.00 
20.00 

103.00 

51.20 

83.34 

1.90 

119.70 
19.90 

109.00 
16.50 

103.00 
20.00 
10.00 
50.00 

5140 

25.50 

113.40 

1.71 
66.50 
83.34 
92.00 

130.00 
20.00 
10.00 
54.00 
92.00 

5.00 

1.25 
i2.07 
24.53 
83.34 

2.35 
92.40 

5.40 

130,00 
10.00 
20.00 

4.75 
24.65 
24.65 

8.50 
34.00 

2.05 
90.30 

5.60 
29.36 
15.00 
25.00 
8334 

130.00 
98.00 
10.00 
20.00 
42.50 
9.40 
1.30 
91.30 
87.05 
83,34 
15.00 
67.98 
17.35 

121.00 
26.25 
61.00 
50.00 
79.50. 

135.00 

130.00 

10.00 

20.00 

5.60 

5.85 

83.34 



Community Public Service Co. 79.80 

Community Public Service Co. , 1.25 

Gayle McElroy - 5.00 

G. E. Groger J. - 92.00 

Walton Lumber Co. 41.80 

R. C. Durr __' 917.52 

J. W. Darlington 55.13 

AUGUST— 

Hejiman Simmons — 1.20 

Herman Simmons 7—'. 4.00 

Herman Simmons _ ,_ 130.00 

James R. Allen 10.00 

Edith Stephenson — 20.00 



Walton Feed Mill 



5.18 



Community Public Service Co. 75.60 

Community Public Service Co. 

Walton Waterworks _„__.^.— ~ - 

J. B. Johnson 1 

L. M. Ackman 

Russell Robinson 



-<«i~.i 



-TBI 



1.30 
83.34 
79.91 
75.00 
55.68 
SEPTEMBER— 

Walton Lumber Co. 1__ 6.91 

R. C. Durr 20.10 

Gaines & Conner 15.00 

Community Public Service Co. 1.10 

Community Public Service Co. 92.40* 

Walton Waterworks 83.34 

Conrad Hardware 1 11.05 

G.E. Groger 207.00 

Walton Advertiser 28.25 

Herman Simmons' 130.00 

Edith Stephenson 35.00 

Edith Stephenson - 15.00 

James R. Allen 10.00 

OCTOBER— 

Herman Simmons 1 130.00 

Edith Stephenson . 35.00 

James R. Allen '— 10.00 

•Russell Robinson . . 7:50 

G. E. Groger « 2 92.00 

1.70 

96.60 

83.34 

3.45 

6.50 

15.30 

6.75 



Community Public Service Co. 

Community Public Service Co. a. 

Walton Waterworkos 

Conrad Hardware 

Walton Advertiser 

R. C. Durr 

A. H. Smith ,.____-=-. 

NOVEMBER— . 

Herman Simmons 130.00 

Edith Stephenson 35.00 

James R. Allen T 10.00 

Community Public Service Co. 100.80 

Community Public Service Co. 1.80 

Walton Waterworks 83.34 

Boone County Recorder 12.00 

A. H. Smith 6.00 

Walton Advertiser 12.65 

Jerman Heating Service :___„ 12.25 

J. B. Jdhnson ______ .. ; 74.96 

Rouse Sign Service * 10.00 

Rouse Sign Service . 2 72.78 

Dixie State Bank 600.00 

G. E. Groger r 115.00 

DECEMBER— 



Herman Simmons 130 

Edith Stephenson 35, 



James R. Allen 

R. M. Hall • 

D. J. Roberts 

G. K. Nicholson 

F. M. DeMoisey 

P. R. Conrad 

A. H. Gaines — 

Gayle McElroy 

Omer Dudgeon 

G. E. Groger - 

G. E. .Groger 



Community Public Service Co. 
Community Public Service Co. 

Walton Waterworks _'_ 

Walton Lumber Co. _; 

Walton Feed Mill „ 



10 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
60 
60 

6 

92 

18 

113 

2 
83 

1, 
13 



Simpson & Johnson 12 

R. C. Durr 



R. C. Durr 

R. C. Durr 

R. C. Durr ,_. 

R. C. Durr w . 

R. C. Durr 

R. C. Durr 

RT C. Durr 

Noel Walton 



40. 

48, 
122, 

45. 

49. 

35. 

45. 
. 36 

25. 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS $9,359 

Balance on hand January 1, 1950 

Bond Account 

Balance on hand January 1, 1949 $5,341.42 

Total deposits _• z 2,763.62 

Interest paid $ 250.00 

Bonds paid : 2,000.00 

$2,250.00 $8,105.04 
Balance on ihand January 1, 1950 __.: .$5,855.04 



00 

.00 

00 _ 

00 

.00 

00 

.00 

00 

00 

.00 

75 

.00 

00 

40 

.40 

,34 

,65 

.00 

,75 

40 

.40 

,45 

,00 I 

,00 

90 

00 

00 

00 

14 $10,055.08 



.$ 695.94 



BABY CHICKS 

ARE HERE! 

Licensed and Approved by Kentucky Department of Agriculture 



OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 
WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 
POULTRY LITTER - REMEDIES 

— TUXEDO FEEDS 

Garden Seed - Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 



■i 



■M 



■■■ 



M 



Thursday, January 19, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Seven 



--FARM BARGAIN 

1/2 mile from Walton on Route 16; 3Vi acres ground with 5-room, 
one-floor plan home with bath; house in good shape; barn, 
chicken house; ground is practically level, with good dug pond. 
Priced to sell at $7,500. , 

REL C. WAYMAN & SONS 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION BROKERS 
623 Washington St.. Covington, Ky. HE 5107. Ind. 5064, JU 4895 



INOTICE TO TRUCK OPERATORS!! 

LOAD LIMITS: 

In order to protect and save the roads of Boone 
County during the winter months, the Boone County 
Fiscal Court feels that it will be necessary to set a 
weight limit on loads carried by trucks over these 
roads during the wet winter months, and the load limit 
has been set at a weight not to exceed three tons over, 
and above, the weight of the truck. 

It is, therefore, ordered by the Court that no truck 
shall carry a load in excess of three tons over and a- 
bove the weight of the truck on any of the roads main- 
tained by the Boone County Road Department during 
wet and soft times from this date to April 15, 1950. 

The above restriction applies to all Rural Blacktop 
Roads and other County Roads, but does not apply to 
State or Federal Highways in the County. 

BOONE COUNTY FISCAL COURT] 



[ 



INDEPENDENCE R. 1 



Hamilton & Jones 



Invites You to Shop! 



Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" . 
LOWEST PRICES 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



This community was saddened on 
Sunday morning of last week to 
learn of the passing of Mrs. Walter 
Moffett at her home on the LLL 
Highway near Nicholson. 

The one week's revival at the Staf - 
fordsburg Methodist church closed 
Sunday night of last week. We were 
very sorry indeed to see Rev. Ryan 
have to leave as the church was be- 
ing revived and souls reclaimed. 
We pray much that the revival will 
go on in our hearts just the same 
and that our members will remem- 
ber their vow and keep on coming 
and praying. If the churches ever 
needed a revival it is now. We hope 
to 'have Bro. Ryan back with us a- 
gain in the near future. 

We were glad to See such a good 
attendance at Sunday school Sun- 
day. Let's begin the New Year right 
and keep on coming, and bring your 
neighbors. 

Also come to prayer services every 
Wednesday evening at 7:30. All are 
welcome, any time. ' 

Mrs. Daisy Richardson and dau- 
ghter Helen and Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Folmer and little son -have; returned 
home from a ten days tour to Texas 
and some other points of interest. 
They missed the icy roads by get- 
ting back home a little ahead of it. 

Miss Rosemary Binder spent the ; 
weekend with her cousin, Mrs. Earl 
Armstrong, and family of Ohio. 
• We have received cards from Mr. 
and Mrs. Dawson Ballinger that they I 
are enjoying the beautiful sunshine j 
in Arizona, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barnett and son | 
Howard entertained for dinner re- 
cently Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Barn- 
ett and family of Latonia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Losey and 
sons enjoyed New Year's day with 
the lartter's sister, Mrs. Hill House, 
and Mr. House. 

We are very glad to report little 
Jerry Binder much improved, and 
we hope it won't be so long until he 
will be able to be up and around 
again. 

Jed Thornton of Latonia spent 
Sunday with his son, Mr. and Mrs. 
Myron Thornton and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Keeney and 
daughter Hope spent a couple of 
days during the holidays with their 
daughter, Mrs. Morris Wharton, of 
near Dayton, Ohio. 



DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

6 1 3 Madison Ave. 

..Covington, Ky. . 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday. 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



.._.,. 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



THE NEW DE LAVAL STERLING SPEEDETTE 

*mmmmrnmm0Mm Especially Designed 

for the Man Who 

Milks Ten Cows 

or Less! 

The new De Laval Sterling Speed- 
ette is designed especially for the 
man milking 10 cows or less. Your 
pocketbook can afford it— and you 
can't afford to be without it ! It will 
save up to 68 full working days a 
year on a 10-cow herd, save you 
countless steps, do the milking In 
half the time and produce more and 
cleaner milk for you. See it today! 




REV mEOETTE 

vacuum nut 

— aim rtqalrtt 

oilinj. diretl-con- 

meltd 10 motor; 

llOVooer.lion. 



R» iTMtHI 

01 UMl STERLING 

SPEEDWAY UNIT 

-foi best milking, 

llslest cleininj, 

long life. 



gg ...s^M^lm^^,m^^ 




WE ANSWER 



Ito Your Toughest 



Plowing Requirements! 




For a plow with 
plenty of brute 
strength ... high 
lift for easy turning 
snd transporting . . . 
plus the extra clear* 
ance necessary for 
deep plowing in 
trashy conditions, 
you'll find a John 
Deere Truss-Frame 
Plow unsurpassed. 
Its many features 
make it a real leader 
in two-, three-, and 
four-bottom plow 
value; See us for 
full details . . . soon. 



JOHN DEEM TRUSS-FRAME PLOWS 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 

HO PIKE STREET COVINGTON, KY. 



L. J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

and 

OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 0535 

Office Hours ... 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 




When The Crash 

Comes — Be 

Protected 

p-^^Hiitual Insurance 
^T Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT' 
PHONE 112 WALTON, KY. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

UAM17V9 CORP. 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Tarda 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market in the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to. us. Why 
not now? 

Reference: Ask the first 
man you meet 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



STURGEON 

Electrical Service 



—Wiring of All Kinds— 



WALTON. KENTUCKY 
— Phone 71 or 1396 — 



There Is (ART) In A RTISTIC 

—FREE CALL & DELIVERY— "~~ 
16 South Main St. Phone 144 Walton, Ky. 



Fur Coats Cleaned & Glazed 

Altering , Invisible Reweaving 

Relining Dyeing 

Leather and Suede Jackets Refinished Like New 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quality Work . . .Guaranteed '• 
— All Garments Insured — 



I. C. GAINES Prop. DAVE WORKMAN 



W. R. McGUIRE 

MOVING 

AND EXPRESSING 

Local and Long Distance 

Packing, Crating and Shipping 

—18 YEARS EXPERIENCE— 

Office . . . Second Floor 

32 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. 

PHONE DIXIE 8145 




P0NTIAC TRADE-IN SALE 

Examine These Bargains Before You Buy! 



'46 CHEVROLET SEDAN 

Black finish, driven little $1095 



radio and heater 



'49 PLYMOUTH SEDAN 

Maroon finish, sun visor, $1795 

radio, heater, many extras 



'47 PONTIAC 2-Tone Grey 

17,000 miles, radio, heater, $1395 



looks new 



'39 CHEVROLET Town Sedan 

Radio, heater, covers, $495 

49,000 miles; bargain 



'46 CHEVROLET Station Wagon 

8-Passenqer, fully equipped, $1095 
dandy utility car 



'39 DODGE Business Coupe 
Black finish; a good $395 



economical car 



'41 PLYMOUTH TUDOR 

Black finish, radio, heater, $695 

seat covers; see this today 



'47 FORD Super Deluxe 
Sedan: Rio red finish, $1095 

fully equipped, looks new 



'37 PONTIAC 6 SEDAN 

Black finish, radio, heater, $295 

seat covers; bargain 



'48 PONTIAC Hydramatic 
Sedan; grey finish, radio, $1695 

heater; a showroom car 



Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 
All are one-owner cars traded in on the NEW '50 PONTIACS. 

Terms to Suit ■ Up to 24 Months to Pay! 

Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 



TOBACCO GROWERS! Sell your tobacco at the Covington 

Independent Tobacco Whse. Co., Erlanger, Ky. 

Just South of Covington, DIXIE HIGHWAY, ROUTES 25 & 42; Out AWAY from RIVER FOG & SMOKE 

Good parking - Clean Rest rooms .'Plenty unloading space. NO WAITING! SALES EVERY OTHER DAY! 

Sell with men whtfiGROW tobacco, who KNOW tobacco and your problems! 

TELEPHONE 

Boyd Elliott, General Manager Dixie 7413 Orie Hill, Auctioneer 

Ernest Dance, Floor Manager • "' «-i L % , ^ ar ^ Acra, Weigh Man ♦■ 
J. W. Grant, Field Man - Grade , ^r. grade, no better Nathan gg^ Reld Man 
market in Kentucky ^^ 



□ 



Page Eight 



'WALTON ADVERTISER. Walton,' Kentucky 



Thursday. January 19, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION zm^ 



Classified advertising rate is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash in advance. 

FOR SALE-^Baled hay and straw r 
5-year-old work horse; 4 Hereford 
bulls; choice building lots, in or 
out of town; electric ohicken 
brooder; 2 electric motors; ©earl 
and white guineas; round exten- 
sion table. John W. Conrad, 67 
High Street, Walton. Phone 563. 

lt-3* 

FOR SALE — All year permanent 
pasture, Ky. 31 Fescue will grow 
in cold weather, where other grass 
sleeps. We have plenty of seed — 
Phone Williamstown 5311. C. C. 
Worthington, Sherman, Ky. 2t-3* 

WANTED*— Hay tedder in good op- 
erating condition, alsougood No. 1 
or No. 2 corn and gooa heavy oats. 
Address Box 495, Route 5, Latonia 
Sta., Covington, Ky., or phone Ind. 
6882, evenings. tf-3 

FOR SALE— Two Guernsey cows will 
freshen soon;also Hereford male. 
iMrs. Nora Benson, Piner-Bracht 
Highway. lt-3* 

RUSSELL'S REFRIGERATOR and 
APPLIANCE REPAIR — Freezers, 
refrigerators, milk coolers, motors, 
pumps, etc.; also limited number 
rebuilt refrigerators, guaranteed 
for whole year. Phone Ind. 7430. 

4t-2» 



INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers it's 
members life insurance, auto and 
truck insurance (largest in Ken- 
tucky), fixe and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tf-2 



WANTED — Man and wife, man for 
general farm work, wife to work in 
house part time; good wages, good 
living conditions. Ivan Horton, 
Manager of Anderland Farm, 
Union, Ky. 2t-3 



FOR SALE — Kenton county farm, 
close in, good dairy or tobacco 
land, In blue grass, house, bam. 
Owner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, 
Ky. 4t-l* 



FOR SALE— Hay, baled, alfalfa 1-2 
3 cutting; soy bean hay and mix- 
ed hay. Ind. 6882, evenings, tf-3 



WANTED — Good grade or registered 
Holstein cows, yearlings and heif- 
er calves; dehorned stock preferred 
and subject to rigid veterinary ex- 
amination and bjood test. Address 
Box 419, Latonia Sta., Covington, 
Ky. Phone Ind. 6882 evenings, tf-3 



ENROLL during January in Blue 
Cross Hospitalization through Boone 
County Farm Bureau. Family 
rates $24.50 per year* most hospital 
expenses covered. Get further in- 
formation, John E. Crigler, agent, 
- Burlington, Ky. 3t-2 



FOR SALE — Two work horses, 8 yrs. 
old. G. R. Epperly, Bullock Pen 
Road. Phone Ind. 6696. 4t-2* 



LOST— Female fox hound, black antf 
tan, white ring around neck, scar 
on right hind leg. Homer Farris. 
Phone Walton 781X. . ^t-3* 

FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
First class work, guaranteed, good 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf-2 



FOR SALE or TRADE — 3-hOTse disc 
turning plow. Several head Mas- 
cova ducks. Nick Webster, Morn- 
ing View. Phone Ind. 6359. 2t-3* 



FOR SALFJ— '42 Studebaker Champ- 
ion 2-door sedan, very good con- 
dition. H. R. Day, Stephenson Mill 
Road. Phone Walton 743. M-3* 



FOR SALE — 15 pigs; team horses, 
guaranteed to work anywhere; 
wagon, hay frame, box bed. Leon 
Pennington, Stephenson Mill Road, 
Walton. Phone 742X. lt-3* 



COVINGTON 

Ef-Ko ARMY Store 

5th and MADISON 

FOR MORE THAN 

27 Years 

WE'VE ALWAYS SOLD 

Good 

Work 

Shoes 

We fit small feet, large feet, 
narrow feet wide feet I 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

STORE 

508 MADISON AVENUE 
COVINGTON 



Hamilton & Jones . invites y ou to shop! 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



GIGANTIC AFTER 
INVENTORY SALE 

PRICES SLASHED 



2.98 Ladies' House Dresses $2.25 

Ladies' House Dresses $1.19 

Children's Dresses . 89c 

Girls' Dresses ;,;, $1.25 

Ladies' Felt Hats _ $1.00, $1.79, $2.29 
Ladies' Purses -_...,..... 79c and $1.00 

Ladies' Change Purses 30b and 50c 

Remnants of Yard Goods 

Earrings 55c pr., 2 pr. $1.00 

Scatter Pins . 55c 

Pearls, long strings $1.00 

Cigarette Lighters (fancy) $5.00 

Tie Holders $1.00 

2.98 Men's Pajamas (A only) ... $1.79 

Girls' Skirts (wool) r„_ $1.00 

Ladies' Skirts (wool) ..... $1.00 

Lace Collars s 50c 

Girls' White Cotton Blouses 50c 

(sizes 5 to 12) 

Boys' Sport Shirts ........ 79c 

(short sleeves) 

Ladies' Housecoats $1.39 

(small sizes - orig. 3.98) 



Boys T Polo Shirts ... . ...... 79c 

Anklets ..... 1* 15c 

Men's Colored Polo Shirts ........ 79c 

Men's Mufflers (colors) .... . $1.00 

Jackets .._., : $1.00 

Boys' Ties .._: .:..l.._.r..._ 39c and 49c 

Ear Muffs ... .._..._.. * 10c 

Little Girls' Knitted Bonnets 15c 

Baby Bonnets . 59c 

Ladies' Houseslippers ....... $1.00 

(assorted styles and sizes) 

Knitted Suite _:. .:.... 79c 

Little Boys' Pajamas . $1.25 

Boys' Caps (odds) 39c 

Men's Caps 39c 

Boys' Coveralls 79c 

Men's Work Pants $1.49, $1.59, $2.49 

Boys' Wool Pants $1.79 

Boys' Light Weight Overalls ... $1.65 

Boys' Ctoon Pants $1.65 

Men's Neckties 79c 

1.98 Ladies' Uniforms ........ $1.39 

Wool Flannel, 54" wide 98c yd. 

Ladies' Better Dresses $5.00, $6.50, up 



Broken Sizes Assorted Styles 

No Exchange On These Purchases 



I CONRAD HARDWARE; 



We Have The Genuine 
™*¥ Window Materials 

Hold in Heat- Keep out Cold 

— ii ^^ Ch*ap*r than class — For Storm 

V/mRSSt SgjN 88?™ * Windows, Porch Enclosures 

w,.7c.* K ,.,., p©Fi.ex-0-Glass 

~ GlassONet 

Plastiglass 
WyrOGlass 

Screen-Glass 



Massey-Harris Tobacco 
Setters .... $195.00 





—$1.95— 



Jamesway Uni-Temp 
Electric Hovers 



9x12 Manitex 
Rugs 

9x12 Gold Seal 
Rugs 



$4.95 



$8.95 




12x12 Armstrong 

Rugs $15.95 

12x15 Armstrong 

Rugs $18.95 

Linoleum by yard 

50c and 89c 

Window Shades 65c 

Square A%i Tub $179.95 Plastic Window 

Square Pore. Tub $149.95 Shades ...... $1.69 

Round Pore. Tub $142.95 Custom Made Venetian 

— Liberal Trade-In — Blinds : 50c sq. ft. 



NATURE'S KEENEST RIVALS 

Tht cholsl of bsttsr Poullrymsn every- 
where — they're Air Conditioned. 
Chicks are Hardier and Feather better 
when brooded this modern, easy, eco- 
nomical way. 

New Air and Heat distribution principle 
prevents hot and cold spots — chicks 
make use of entire brooding area — no 
crowding or piling up. 

If you have 'electricity you will want to 
see this new hover. 

We also carry the complete line of 
Jamesway brooding and laying equip- 
ment. 

4'x4' $39.95 

4'x6' $47.00 



for Service 



large or Small 
.... See Powers 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES 01 HOUSEHOLD 
«„_ ., APPLIANCES 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKY 



FOR SALE-^1 or 5 tons alfalfa hay, 
baled. G. H. Moore, South Wal- 
ton. Phon« 516. 2t-3* 



CHICKS and Hatching Eggs from 
high producing, pulloruxn-tested 
Reds. Breeders immunized against 
Newcastle. Chicks from such a 
flock can make mpney for you. 
Grant Maddox, Florence. Phone 
384. • ' 6t-2 



FOR SALE— Wood and jcpal range, 
A-l. condition. Call Ind. 6988. lt-3* 



FOR SALE— Baled soy bean hay. 
Phone Walton 29. 2t-3 



FOR SALE— Baled hay, first, second 
and third cutting alfalfa, priced 
right - for quick sale. Duckhead 
Inn. Walton, Ky., Route 2. Phone 
Walton 288. y3t-2* 



WASTED TO BUY— Several 1000 ft. 
of Ash, Oak and Walnut lumber 
in the tree. Call Florence 419. 

. . • ' tf-50 



FOR SALE— Hotpoint electric range, 
$60.00, good condition. COlonial 
7064. 2t-3 



WANT TO RENT— Two or 3 rooms, 
not more than mile from bus line; 
needed badly. William McGowan, 
Gen. Del., Williamstown, Ky. lt-3* 

FOR SALE— -1947 Studebaker %-ton 
Pickup truck. FRIEDL, INC., 1225 
Madison Ave., Used Car and Truck 
•Dept., Covington. HE 6000. lt-3 

HAY, STRAW, CORN— Delivered in 
quantities of one ton or more. 
Phone Ind. 6427. Russell Klein, 
Morning View, -Ky. 3t-l* 



FOR SALE— 1949 Chevrolet %-ton 
(pickup truck, like new. FRIEDL, 
INC., 1225 Madison Ave., Used Car 
and Truck Dept., Covington, Ky. 
HE 6000. lt-3 



FOR SALE— 1947 Studebaker truck, 
1%-ton, chassis and cab, 155-inch 
wheel base, like new. FRIEDL, 
INC., 1225 Madison Ave., Used Car 
and Truck Dept., Covington. HE 
6000. lt-3 



FOR SALE — Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. tf-1 



FOR SALE— Beautiful all white Phil- 
gas stove; also Philgas water heat- 
er, and room heater. Rosegate 
Farm, Dixie Highway. 2t-l* 



FOR SALE— iAll kinds of Oak Lum- 
ber, fancing planks. All types of 
dressed lumber. Stevens Lumber 
dealer, Phone Florence 419. tf-5.0 

SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE— All nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimatesr .Phone E. "Ihobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf-1 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — It works, 
it pays^ it gets calves. Sign up in 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay- 
lor,- Walton 582. fcf-45 

Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued on Page 4) 



FOR SALE— Baby beef, suitable for 
locker or deep freeze; will sell 
whole or by quarters; also pigs. 
Ira Stephenson, Walton-Nicholson 
Road. Phone Ind. 6742. 4t-2* 



FOR SALE — Looking for appliances, 

■ such as Refrigerators, Washers, 

Deep Freeze, Heaters, Radios, used 

or new, call Independence 6585. 

Myron Stephens. 40t-47* 



FOR RENT— Power Chain Saws with 
one man $3.50 per hour. Phone 
Florence 419. » tf-50 




1949 Chev. T-Door Demo. 1946 Chevrolet T-Door 



1941 Olds 4-Door 
1941 Pontiac 2-Door 

1939 Pontiac 4-Door 
1938 Chevrolet 4-Door 
1937 Chevrolet Coupe 

1940 Chevrolet T-Dioor 



1 935 Plymouth Coupe 

USED f RUCKS 

1939 Chev. 1 Yi*on Dump 
1 939 White 2V 2 -ton Dump 
1946 G. M. C. 2-ton 



-Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 



Kenton Co. Motors 

T" 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. 5004 



- 



Also Cooking, 
Water Heating 
and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 



WALTON, KY. 



T' F 



I 



I 



WALT 











— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper -— 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY - BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advan 




ce 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 1950 



Burley Prices Lowest 
Of Season, Avg. $41.29 



Volume 35 — Number 4 



Markets Beginning 
To Close for Season 



Average prices for a large num- 
ber of grades sold on Burley tobacco 
markets this week were the lowest 
since the season began. Most were 
$1.00 to $4.00 under the previous 
week. A few grades were unchang- 
ed. Theweekly average was $3.2fi 
less and the lowest, of the season. 

According to the Federal-State 
Market News Service, volume of of- 
ferings continued heavy. For the 
period ending January 20, gross sales 
amounted to 74.4 million pounds for 
$41.29 per hundred. Season gross 
sales were brought to 554.7 million 
pounds for an average of $45.56. 

Declines were general with heav- 
iest losses for low and fair leaf, tips 
and some fair lugs. Prior to this 
week all lugs had been in good de- 
mand. Some better grades of fly- 
ings and- lugs wereunchanged. 

Reduced proportions of good and 
fair lugs and good leaf lowered the 
quality slightly. There was an in- 
crease in the percentage of nohde- 
scvript. Bulk sales, however, con- 
tinued to consist of fair and low 
grades of all groups, nondescript and 
good flyings. 

The percentage of baskets con- 
signed to Associations was the larg- 
est reported this season. It was 
estimated that 10 to 12 percent were 
pooled under the Government loan 
program. Through January 13 de- 
liveries had amounted to 21.9 mil- 
lion pounds or slightly over 4.5 per- 
cent of gross sales as of that date. 

During the week the following 
markets closed: Bloomfield, Glas- 
gow, Greens-burg, Horse Cave, Leb- 
anon, London, Scottsville and 
Springfield, Ky.; Columbia, Frank- 
lin, Gallatin, Rogersville, Springfield 
and Sweetwater, Tenn.; Ashevtlle, 
Boone and West Jefferson, N. C. In 
Kentucky, markets that have an- 
nounced closing dates are: Bowling 
Green, Harrodsburg and Somerset, 
Jan. 24; Richmond, Jan. 25. In Ten- 
nessee, Knoxville, Jan. 24, and 
Greeneville, Jan. 25. Most other 
Tennessee markets will close next 
week but dates reported are tenta- 
tive. Final sales will be held at 
Abingdon, Va., Jan. 24 and Madison. 
Ind., Jan. 27. 



Income Tax; Man Here 

Collector of Internal Revenue, S. 
R. Glenn, announces that a deputy 
from his office will visit Walton on 
February 6, 7 and 8, and Burlington 
on February 20, 21 and March 14, for 
the purpose of assisting taxpayers 
in filing their ifinal 1949 returns and 
their estimated returns for the year 
1950. Their returns should be filed 
by March 15, 1950. 

Mr. Glenn says that his deputy is 
familiar with the laws and is being 
sent here to be of service to the tax- 
paying public. The service is abso- 
lutely free. Collector Glenn urges 
the taxpayers of this county to see 
the deputy and let him help them 
with their income tax problems. 



Thanks Expressed 
For Support In 
Xmas Seal Sale 



District Basketball 
Set For St. 
r, Simon Kenton 



Tourney 



Henry, 



Representatives of schools, In a 
meeting in Erlanger, last Monday 
night, decided to. hold the 34th Dis- 
trict basketball tournament at two 
sites, St. Henry ih Erlanger and 
Simon Kenton near Independence. 

Present plans are for all teams 
drawing in the upper bracket to play 
at Simon Kenton and all dower 
bracket teams playing at St. Henry, 
with the final game set for Simon 
Kenton. * 

There will be one game each night 
at, each of the two floors, and the 
meet will open Wednesday, March 1 
and continue through Saturday, 
March 4, with game time at both 
schools set for 8:00 p. m. 

Referees and other officials of the 
tournament have been selected but 
have not been officially announced. 
Tourney managers will be Rebuen 
Hinsdale, Simon Kenton principal, 
and Bert Wi'lmhoff, St. Henry coach. 

Teams participating in the 34th 
district meet are Burlington, Erlan- 
ger Lloyd, Florence, Hebron, New 
Haven, Simon Kenttm, St Henry, 
and Walton. 

Morris Store b Open 
For Business As Usual 

The (Morris Department Store, Er- 
langer, which had a $5,000 fire in 
their stock room recently, is open 
for business as usual, according to 
the manager. The store part of the 
building was not damaged nor the 
merchandise in the storeproper. They 
promise that as soon as possible they 
will make a special announcement 
for their customers. Morris has been 
a regular advertiser in this paper for 
the past five years. 



Officials of the Boone County 
Tuberculosis Association wish to ex 
press their sincere appreciation to 
the people of this county for their 
generous support of the recent seal 
sale. 

Your contribution is helping to 
support Boone county patients who 
are now being cared for in the san- 
itarium at Hazelwood and it is help- 
ing to fight TB through education 
and research. 

It is the plan of the local associa- 
tion to have an X-ray unit in the 
county early next summer to furn- 
ish free X-ray examinations for all. 
This is the only sure way to detect 
tuberculosis. 

Boone county can be proud of. the | 
fact that it stands at the top. of the 
state in the seal sale per capita and 
in order to maintain this splendid 
record we urge those who have fail- 
ed to make their contribution to do 
so now. It is still not too late to 
help in this great cause. 

Remember that eighty percent of 
all donations stay in the county and 
that none of it is spent for salaries 
—but for support of sanitorium pat- 
ients, education and research. 

Again we say "thanks" to the gen- 
erous people of our county. 
( Sibbia Reimer, Chairman 
Kathryn Cropper, Treasurer 
Ralph Maurer, Pub. Chairman 



HOFF-TANNER 

On January 1st at Hopeful Luth- 
eran Church, Florence, Miss Reba 
Hoff and Mr. David Tanner were 
quietly married. The couple's only 
attendants were the groom's brother 
and sister, Miss Mary Jane Tartner 
and Mr. Joseph Tanner. 

The bride was lovely in a navy 
blue dress with a red rose corsage. 
The groom chose a grey suit with a 
white carnation buttonaire. Mrs. 
Robert Moore sang "Always, "I Love 
You Truly," and "Oh, Promise Me," 
before the ceremony began. 

Mr. Tanner is associated with the 
Commonwealth Life Insurance Co., 
and also does auctioneering. 

The couple is diving in Walton, 
and their host of friends wish them 
a long and happy life together. 



Bearcats Trip Simon Kenton 
53-51, and Take Bellevue 67-61 



Reapers Class Meets 

The Reapers Sunday school class 
of New Bethel Baptist Church, Ve- 
rona, met in the home of Mrs. Lil- 
lian Stephenson for the regular 
monthly meeting. After the busin- 
ess session, the program was Jed by 
Mrs. Geneva Ferguson. The class 
song, "Bringing In the Sheaves," Was 
sung by the group. Mrs. Ellena 
Hamilton gave the. devotional from 
John A. Burroughs' boow on Prayer. 
Mrs. Mary Z. Spaulding gave the 



story of a famous woman of the 
Bible and her faith and courage in 
spite of her past sins. 

A salad course was served to the 
following members and guests: 

Mrs. Geneva Ferguson, Mary Port- 
er, Ellena Hamilton, Mary Spauld- 
ing, Gertrude Brewster, Arsolia Hay- 
den, Allie Chandler, Kitty Rouse, 
Iolene Scott, Rema Ashcraft, Gerald- 
ine Harris, Becky Rushing,. William 
Mathis, Billy Mathis, Beverly and 
"Chris" Rushing, James and Clifford 
Stephenson; also William Mathis, 
Dewey Ferguson, and Raymond 
Stephenson. 



MALCOLM C. COX 

A 65-year-old farmer, Malcolm C. 
Cox, committed suicide Monday by 
firing a .22-caliber rifle into his fore- 
head in a bedroom of his home on 
Independence, Route 1, according to 
Mrs. Tressa Riffe, Kenton County 
Coroner. 

Mrs. Riffe said that Cox's wife, 
Mrs. Nellie Cox, found herhusband's 
body slumped in a chair in the morn- 
ing. She added that Mrs. Cox sum- 
moned Dr. Robert Kratz of Indepen- 
dence, who pronounced him dead. 
He left no note, but the Coroner said 
Mrs. Cox indicated that her husband 
had been despondent over ill health. 

Mrs. Riffe recalled also that Cox's 
son, Marion G. Cox,- 17, had taken 
his own life with a .38-calibre re- 
volver in -1946. 

Cox is survived by his widow; a 
son, Warner Cox of Kenton county; 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Cox 
of Independence; a sister, Mrs. Irene 
Murphy of Lexington, and a grand- 
child. A veteran of World War I, he 
was a member of Moon Brothers 
Post, American Legion, Indepen- 
dence. * 

Funeral services are to be held to- 
day (Thursday) at 2:30 p. m. in the 
Cox residence, with Rev. R. C. Scholl 
officiating. Burial will be in the 
Independence Cemetery. 



Birth Announced 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Blaine Dan- 
iels of Covington, a son, Barry Keith. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Chipman of 
Wllliamstown are the maternal 
grandparents and Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert M. Daniels of Walton are the 
paternal grandparents. 



Many Auctions To 
Be Held In This 
Area; 4 Saturday 



Christian Church Services 

On Sunday morning at the 11 
o'clock service, Rev. Fred S. Nichols, 
pastor of the Walton Christian 
Church, will preach on "The New 
Birth." 



MRS. LUCY SANNING 

Funeral services were held in the 
Chambers & Grubbs funeral home, 
Walton, Friday at 2:00 p. m. for Mrs. 
Lucy Sanning, 89, a member of the 
Walton Baptist Church for 75 years, 
who died last Wednesday at the 
home of a nephew, W. M. Rice, Wal- 
ton, where she had resided for sev- 
eral months. Rev. R. F. DeMoisey 
and Rev. B. C. Garrett officiated. 
Burial was in Walton Cemetery. 

Mrs. Sanning was a charter mem- 
ber of the Walton Baptist Missionary 
society and Walton Chapter, 161, 
Order of Eastern Star. 

She leaves a niece, Mrs. A. E. 
Greeno, Vicksburg, Miss., and two 
nephews, Clifford Holbourn, Louis- 
ville, and Wilford M. Rice, Walton. 

"Coke" Hall Named 
Mayor of Walton As 
Council Takes Seat 



Warsaw Conies 
Here Next Tuesday 



Russell "Coke" Hall has been nam- 
ed by theWalton Town Council to 
act as Mayor for the coming two 
years. The entire Council, which is 
composed of Mr. Hall, Powers Con- 
rad, Kyle Nicholson, Frank DeMoisey 
and Dan Roberts, weresworn in re- 
cently at the Town Hall by Mrs. J. 
B. Johnson, Notary Public. 

At the election last fall, Kyle 
Nicholson received the largest num- 
ber of votes and as in the past was 
in line for Mayor, but refused to 



A week from Sunday morning will .. 
be Youth Sunday at which time the serve in this capacity, and nominat 
f/^T 1 ^ 1 * 2 * 011 "In the Master's ed Hall for Mayor, who was voted 
Wands.", The youth choir will sing. ' 



Masons Meet Tonight 

Walton Lodge, 719, F. & A. M. will 
meet at 7:00 p. m. this (Thursday) 
evening in the Masonic Hall. There 
will he degree work, and refresh- 
ments. 



Boone County 
Ministers Organize; 
To Meet at Florence 



At a meeting in Florence, last 
week, with over half of theministers 
of Boone County in attendance, a 
County Ministers Association was 
formed for the purpose of fellowship 
and cooperation. In a meeting 
which was marked toy genuine fri- 
endliness and good will, the follow- 
ing officers were elected by a unan- 
imous vote: President, Rev. R. A. 
Johnson, Burlington Baptist Church ; 
Vice PresidentrRev. Herman Andres, 
Florence Lutheran Church; Secre- 
tary, Rev. Sam Reid, Florence Chris- 
tian Church; Treasurer, Rev. V. V. 
Hill, BullittsvJlle Methodist Church. 

ft was decided toy unanimous vote 
that the organization would meet 
every .third Monday at 9:30 a. m. ( 
with Rev. Cecil Ogg as host minister 
at the Florence Methodist Church. 
AH licensed or ordained ministers in 
the county, holding or -having held 
regular pastorates, are eligible for 
membership. The public is cordially 
invited to attend these meetings. 



The auction will play an import- 
ant part in this section for the next 
few weeks, with six sales toeing ad- 
vertised in this issue and more to 
come. The sales contain everything 
from nice farms,, implements, cattle 
afnd furniture to antinques. It would 
be wise to check these sales. 
Four Saturday, Jan. 28 

Saturday, January 28 will be a 
busy auction day, with four sales 
advertised in this issue for that day. 
They are: Mrs. Nannie O'Hara, Ve- 
rona, near L. & N. Depot, selling five 
rooms' of furniture, including some 
valuable ^antiques, conducted by 
Bradford *& Worthington; Jim Gay- 
hart, on the iMt. Zion and Verona 
Road at farm known as "Old Ken- 
nedy Homestead," will sell a 65-acre 
farm, household goods, antiques, 
farm tools and livestock, with W. Z. 
Rimer, auctioneer; Rel C. Wayman 
& Sons will sell .the 125-acre farm 
of Stella Blackburn on Lincoln Ridge 
Road, 5 miles southeast of Williams- 
town, and W. E. Lillard, adminis- 
trator, will sell two farms, 8 acres 
arid 103 acres, livestock, farm' tools, 
household furniture, on EHIston Rd., 
near Napoleon, with Chas. Duncan, 
auctioneer. 

On Monday, January. 30, Charles 
Linder will sell at Fiskburg, Ky., a 
stock of^eneral merchandise, etc., 
and on Friday, February 3rd, be- 
ginning at 12:00 noon, W. L. Satch- 
will sell his herd of dairy cows at 
the farm on Porter Road/l mile west 
of Verona, Ky. Bradford & Worth 
ington are the auctioneers. 



in unanimously. 
John H. Wood. Police Judge 
missionary Meeting John Wood, who in the election 

The Woman' Missionary society of i J 49 * fal1 receiv e<l the highest num- 
the Walton Christian Church will ! b er " votes for Police Judge, was 
meet at the church Thursday, Feb. f Wor " in at Arlington. He topped 
2nd. A covered-dish luncheon will + . writei n" ticket with six vote, 
be served at noon. .Mrs. Bert Parker , Q Jf n ;. 

and Mrs. Jesse Callen wiir serve on ' „ ■ rst offlcial acts of the Coun- 
the hostess committee. c11 were the rehiring and appoint- 

The afternoon program is one of a [" ent of the fori "er officers of the 

town: Gayle McElroy, clerk; A. H. 

. lenson, 
waterworks superintendent; Edith 
Stephenson, tax collector; Herman 
Simmons, Police Chief, and James 
R. Allen, Assistant Police Chief. 



FT. 


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51 



series entitled, 
In Japan." 



Friendly Journeys ,™ : ua y je McElroy, clerk; 
Gaines, treasurer; John Stephe 



Interesting Program 
For Homemakers at 
Farm-Home Convention 



To Observe Foreign 
Mission Day Jan. 29 



On Sunday, January 29, the Union, 
Richwood and Lebanon Presbyterian 
churches are observing a Foreign 
Mission Day. ~& special program 
wi^l be held in the Union church for 
all three churches. 

This program will start at 10:QO 
a. m., Sunday morning, with the 
Sunday schools of all churches par- 
ticipating. According to Rev. D. R. 
Hopkins, , pastor, several Japanese 
Christians from Cincinnati will be 
present. The Sunday school program 
will be in charge of these guests. . 

After the Sunday school and 
church services, there will be a fel- 
lowship dinner in the church rooms, 
followed toy an informal social hour. 

These churches cordially invite all 
who are interested in 'this all -day 
program to attend. 



The thirty-eighth annual Farm 
and Home Convention will toe in 
session f,rom January 31 through 
February 3 in Memorial Hall, Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, Lexington. 

Registration will begin at 9:00 a. 
m on Tuesday-and each local Home- 
makers Club should send a delegate 
to the convention. A 100% attend- 
ance for Boone county would be ap- 
preciated. Aa, educational and in- 
teresting program has been planned. 

Dr. Regina Wescott, Consultant in 
Family and Community Develop- 
ment, Department of Health, Mil- 
waukee, Wis., will speak Tuesday 
on the subject, "Let's Start With Our- 
selves." . (Miss Mary Styyvesant, 
Beauty Advisor, Paul's of New York, 
will- talk, on, "Fashion and You." 
Both Dr." Wescott and Miss Stuyves- 
ant will- be on trie program Wednes- 
day, alsd. J " ■ Q 

Chas'. P. Taylor, Educational Di- 
rector, American Cancer Society of 
Louisville, will speak on, "Can We 
Defeat the Traitor Within?" Presi- 
dent of Associated Country Women 
of the World, Mrs. Raymond Sayre of 
Ackworth, Iowa, is Scheduled for 
Thursday. Her -subject will be, "Is 
There A Chance for Germany?" 

'Mrs. James Wyker, Ohio Council 
of Churches, Mt. Vernon, Ohio, will. 
talk on, "The Rural Home, America's 
Bulwark." District Director, Mrs. W. 
J. Mara, will be on the program, with 
other delegates who attended the 
National meeting in Colorado. Miss 
Alice Word, international Youth Ex- 
change Delegate, of Hopkinsvllle, is 
to talk on her experiences, "Living 
In Denmark." Many more interest- 
ing speakers are also on the pro- 
gram, so come on ladies, let's pack 
out luggage and be in Lexington for 
the convention. If you're not a del- 
egate, go anyway. Try to attend a 
couple of days, at least. There's fun 
and education for everyone. — Pub. 



Literary Club to Meet • 

The Walton Woman's Literary 
Club will meet at the Phoenix Hotel 
on Wednesday, February 1st at 2:30 
p. m. ( with Mrs. James Powers as 
hostess. 



Tobacco Meeting At 
Burlington, January 27 

Russell Hunt, tobacco specialist 
from the University, will meet with 
tobacco growers at the Courthouse 
in Burlington at 2:00 p. m., Friday, 
January 27, according to Bill Davis, 
Boone County Agent. 

Mr. Hunt will discuss varieties, 
diseases and culture in the produc- 
tion of Burley tobacco. A series of 
slides will be used to illustrate the 
Important points" of the discussion. 

Mr. Hunt is an outstanding auth- 
ority on the production of Burley to- 
bacco, and always has information 
that is of value to ffibse who hear 
him. Everyone is invited to attend 
the meeting. 



Legion Polio Dance 
To Be Held On 
Saturday, Jan. 28 



In cooperation with the Nation -al 
Polio fund-raising campaign, the 
Walton American Legion Post will 
hold their annual benefit dance this 
Saturday at their home on Beaver 
Road. Jack Cahill and his orchestra 
will furnish the music for the oc- 
casion. Your patronage will help 
build the fund to fight polio. Do 
your part and help some unfortun- 
ate child, maybe your own. 

Friday night will be square dance 
night again at the Legion hall, and 
Freddie Fields and his band will 
furnish music for the ever- increasing 
number of square dancers. Drop in, 
and pat your feet awhile. — Pub. Ohr. 



The Walton -Verona Bearcats post- 
ed wins 12 and 13 the past week 
when they defeated Simon Kenton 
and Bellevue. Last Friday night on 
the (Independence floor the Cats 
edged the Pioneers 53-51, and Tues- 
day, on the home floor, took ; the 
measure of the Tigers 67-61. 

The Simon Kenton game was a 
battle all the way, with the Cats 
having to come, from behind in. the 
final period to win. The Pioneers 
led 19-15 at the end of the first per- 
iod, 28-27 at the half, and 42-39 at 
the close of the third quarter. Don 
Rice scored the winning two points 
in the final seconds of play, after 
the lead had changed hands several 
times during the final period. 

Bearcats (53) . FG 

Rice 4 

Johnson 2 

Cleek 4 

Maddox 3 

Vest 6 

Meadows _"1 

Cheeseman 2 

Totals 22 

Pioneers (51) FG 

Ervin 4 

Henzman 5 

Coppage 7 

Hardgrove 1 

Berryman 1 

Totals 18 

The Simon Kenton reserves won 
the preliminary game 33-22. 

In Tuesday's game, the locals, ex- 
cept for the final few minutes, play- 
ed top-notch ball in defeating the 
Bellevue Tigers. The visitors took 
the lead in the first period and at 
the end of the quarter were in front 
11-9. However the Cats took over 
in the second quarter and led 26-19 
at intermission.. In the third stanza 
they really burned up the nets, out- 
scoring the Tigers 23-15 to lead 49- 
34 as the quarter ended. The Cats 
coasted some in the fourth period 
and as a result the Tigers were 
closing the gap as the game ended 
67-61 in Walton's favor. 

Bearcats (67) FG 

Rice 6 

Johnson 2 

Cleek 5 

Ryan o 

Maddox i 

Cheeseman 1 

Meadows 2 

Vest 9 

Totals 26 

Tigers (61) FG 

Lebel e» 

Perin 7 

Havercamp 6 

Gustin 4 

Jones 1 

Binkley __„__ 

Totals 24 

The second team game was won 
by Bellevue, 33-22. 

At Owingsville, Friday; 
Warsaw Here Tuesday 

The Bearcats go to Owingsville, 
Ky., on Friday, Jan. 27, and next 
Tuesday, Jan. 31, Warsaw comes to 
Walton. These are both strong 
teams and the Cats will have to be 
on their toes in order to win. 



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61 



Junior G. A.'s Meet 

The Junior G. A. girls of the Wal- 
ton Baptist Church held their regular 
meeting January 18 at the church, 
after school. Those present were 
Misses Shirley Carpenter, Janice Os- 
borne, Loretta Johnson, Irma Rector, 
Masil Allen, Lexie DeMoisey, Tillie 
Cheesman, and three new members, 
Misses Donna Joy Wright, Joanna 
Kent an* Delaine Smith. 

Guests were Mrs. Burton Garrett 
and 'Mrs. Lebus Stephenson, coun,- 
selor. Miss liana Rector, program 
leader, gave a nice program, the 
topic being, "Who Owns the World?" 

The ne»t meeting is to .be held on 
Wednesday afternoon, February 1st, 
after school, at the church. All mem- 
bers are requested to be present, and 
new members are welcome. 



A cook book of favorite recipes 
compiled by members of the Christ- 
ian County Homemakers Associa- 
tion-made a net profit of $1,089. 



Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 26, 1950 



WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 



Entered as Second TSlass Matter 

January 1, 1916 at the Post 

Office at Walton. Ky. 



Mark M. Meadows 

Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

$1.50 PER TEAR 
(In Advance) 



MEMBER 

KENTUCKY PRES! 
AS SOCIATION , 

OIGAMIltD JAKUAH IHI 




.nWASHINGTJST 



At least 55 farmers in Montgomery 
county used the methyl bromide 
treatment for tobacco beds last fall. 

Whitley county farmers took ad- 
vantage of the free bulletins on 
farming and homemaking in the 
county agent's office and picked up 
1,009 copies in one month. 

Jackson county's corn derby win- 
ner was Virgil Tincher, 4-H club 
member, with a yield of 141 bushels 
for one acre. 



Few — if any — developments here 
in Washington on the 1950 senatorial 
race in Kentucky. There's a report 
that former Governor Keen Johnson 
is interested. But Mr. Johnson was 
in Washington this week and made 
no announcement. 

There's been nothing but silence 
from Congressman Noble Gregory on 
his senatorial plans. Some had ex- 
pected him to make an announce- 
ment on his return to the capital. 
But he has said nothing. A few ob- 
servers now feel that the First Dis- 
trict Democrat has decided not to 
make the race. 

That Big Budget: 

The big budget submitted by Pres- 
ident Truman has created no little 
discussion. As you know, it calls 
for a five billion dollar deficit. And 
some members of congress are plan- 
ning to cut down on government 
spending if at all possible. 

This week Congressman Bates of 
Kentucky came forward with his 
plan to help save money. He is 
chairman of the Appropriation Com- 
mittee for the District of Columbia. 
All Washington officials have re- 
quested 119 million dollars, almost 
as much as it takes to operate the 
entire State of Kentucky. 

But those city officials have reck- 
oned without iMr. Bates. In one short 
sentence, the congressman from 
Greenup said this: 
, "They aren't going to get that 
much!" 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



Which means Congressman Bates 
plans to help balance the budget. 
A Visitor: 

John Young Brown, the former 
congressman from Kentucky was a 
recent visitor to Washington. We 
found him in the corridors of the 
caipitol talking to Chief Justice Fred 
Vfhson. 

Naturally, when two such Ken- 
tuckians get together, we were in- 
terested in the subject of their con- 
versation. So we asked! 

The two, long time political fri- 
ends, were talking about -develop- 
ments at Frankfort and the opening 
of the General Assembly. And both 
men agreed that a legislative steam- 
roller is a fine thing — if it is your 
steamroller. 
New Committee: 

Senator Garrett Withers has re 
ceived another committee assign- 
ment. Last year, the junior senator 
was a .member of the Senate Labor 
committee which handled a bundle 
of important measures. 

Today, however, he is on the Sen- 
ate Judiciary Committee. It looks 
as though he will not be entirely 
relieved of dabor problems, in spite 




RAY HALL 

Manufacturing Optician 

Doctor's Optical Prescriptions 

Accurately Filled, Broken 

Lenses Replaced. Expert 

Optical Repairing 

122 PIKE ST. COVINGTON 
HEmlock 1992 



AUCTION 



2 Farms 



8 Acres - 103 Acres 



Having been appointed administrator of my mother's estate, Lilly Mae Lillard, I will offer for sale 
the following property, on .? 

Saturday, Jan. 28th 

10:00 A. M. (FAST TIME) 

TRACT NO. 1— Consisting of 8 acres. 300 feet off Highway No. 16. on Elliston Hoad, laying on the 
East side of Odd Fellows Cemetery at Napoleon, Ky. This ground is all level and a perfect location 
to build a home. 

TRACT NO. 2 — Home place, consisting of 103 acres, all in grass and hay except tobacco allotment 
which is 2.4 acres for next year; a two-story frame house consisting of 9 rooms and hall, concrete 
front porch and bacg porch; one feed barn 44x50, tobacco barn 40x44, corn crib, wash house, hen 
house, smoke house, all in good condition. This farm has about 7 acres of alfalfa, nice orchard, 
plenty of water, consisting of 3 ponds, a cistern and creek; telephone line at the house, and electric 
line surveyed. This farm is 1/2 mile off Highway 16 on Eagle Tunnell Road. 3 miles Northeast of 
Glencoe, Ky. , • 

LIVESTOCK — Sorrel horse, work anywhere, 12 years old; span mules, 4 and 5 years old, well 
broke; Shorthorn and Hereford cow, 7 years old; Jersey and Shorthorn cow, 5 years old; Angus cow, 
4 years old; Hereford and Shorthorn, 4 years old; Angus and Shorthorn bull, 10 months old. All 
cows are pasture bred. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS — Rubber tired wagon, hay frame, like new; farm wagon, bed, hay frame; 
Avery 10-disc, good one; alfalfa rake; rounder plow; Syracuse hillside plow; Rastus plow; 2 double 
shovel plows; sheep rack; 2-horse tobacco setter; 2 sets work harness, like new; pitchforks, hoes, 
etc.; about 4 tons alfalfa hay, loose; about 80 bushels of corn. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— Bedroom suite, bed, dresser and chest of drawers; 2 studio couches, 
one like new; living room suite; dining room suitte, table, buffet, 4 chairs; sewing machine; victro- 
la; dresser; wash stand; full size bed and springs; 1/2-bed and springs; 3 rocking chairs; library 
table; 4 linoleum rugs, 9x12; wool rug, 9x12. and 2 hall runners; fern table; coffee table; end table; 
smoking stand; kitchen table, 4 chairs; gas stove; ice box; Norge philgas stove, like new; feather 
beds; 2 mattresses and pillows; 3 chenille bedspreads; Silvertone radio; Alladin lamp; 2 medicine 
cabinets; 2 Rayo lamps; drum stove and pipes; wash boiler; ironing board; laundry stove; iron 
kettle; hot and cold Jug; window screens; cooking utensils, dishes and other items too numerous to 
mention. 

TERMS ANNOUNCED DAY OF SALE I LUNCH SERVED BY LADIES OF PAINT LICK CHURCH! 

W. E. LILLARD 

Administrator, Estate of Lillie Mae Lillard, Deceased 
COL. CHARLES DUNCAN. AUCTIONEER 



of the change. The Judiciary Com- 
mittee may investigate labor union 
monoplies. 
Do You Know: . 

Congressman Bates has renewed 
his opposition to the Falmouth dam 

. . Attempts are being made to 
close the flood gates at Dewey Res 
ervoir in Floyd county and thus 
create another great artificial lake 
for Kentucky sportsmen . . • Con- 
gressman Ohelf, an expert with the 
mouth organ, is going to take part 
in an amateur night in the capital. 
Its all for charity . . . And Kentucky 
congressmen are pushing Camp 
Breckinridge as the site for the new 
Air Force Academy. 

CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to express our thanks to 
all our friends and neighbors who 
helped in any way during the illness 
and death of our loved one, Johnny 
Poole. Especially do we wish to 
thank Fr. Carline, Fr. Busemeyer and 
Fx. Poole for their services; the altar 
boys; the choir; the pallbearers; 
those who sent flowers, cards and 
food; those who prepared the grave, 
and Fred Hamilton, funeral director, 
for the efficient manner m which 
the services were conducted. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Poole 
lt-4* and Family 



J 



— new — 



ame 



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THEATER 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

One Show Each Night • 7:30 p. m. 
Sunday Matinee • 2:30 p. m. 

FRI. & SAT. :: JAN. 27 • 28 

Win. HOLDEN - Win. BENDIX 
— in — 

Streets of Laredo 



SUN. & MON. :: JAN. 29 - 30 

Loreffa Young - Van Johnson 



-in — 



Mother Is, A Freshman 

TUE. & WED. : JAN. 31 -FEB. 1 

Burt Lancaster • Yvonne DeCario 
— in— 

Criss Cross 



DR. PAUL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



[DIAMOND 
LVALUE . . . 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and 
admiration. 

Come to Motch's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced in strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
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of getting dollar for 
dollar value, in your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 
Monthly Payments! 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 
—Since 1857— 
" 613 Madison Avenue 
COVINGTON. KENTUCKY 






TELEVISION! 

G. E., Philco, Emerson and Zenith — closing out floor 

samples— priced from $100 and up. 

Home Freezers — floor samples— -8 cu. ft., $240 and up 

Refrigerators— G. E. and Philco — $165 and up; also 

Fairbanks-Morse Water Pumps and Water Heaters 

Liberal Trade-In Allowances! Easy Terms! 

R. W. Gross Appliances 

Dealer for G. E. and Philco Appliances 
Phone Ind. 5111 Independence, Ky. 



HENRY'S BOOTERY 

SHOES ... For the Entire Family . . . SHOES 

Next to Kroger Super Market - Erlanger, Ky. 

SHOP HERE & SAVE 

RED GOOSE SHOES RUBBER FOOTWEAR 

MEN'S GOOD WORK SHOES 

—PHONE DIXIE 8034— 



FOR SALE 

Wed., Feb. 1st 

AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON 

At Williamstown Stock Yards 

WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. 

Tractors and Tractor Plows arid Discs; Grain Binders 
and Manure Spreaders; Corn Binders — A Complete 
Line of All Kinds of Farm Implements. 

J. L. MOODY 



Maytag! $29.95 

For Your Old Washer; No Down Payment; 1 Yr. to Pay 

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Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
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Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
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THE MAYTAO CHIEFTAIN. A p THE MAYTAO COMMANDER 

nine Maytag , yet priced within • Big, squara poroalatn tub. Gyra- 

few dollars of tbalowast- M - . foam action waahaa tm _ _ 

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856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 






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Thursday, January 26, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Three 




NEW BETHEL BAPTIST. VERONA 

Rev. R. F. DeMotsey, Pastor 

Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School - 10:00 a. m, 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m 

—Services Every Sunday— 




•♦ 



WALTON 'BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Fred S. Nichols, Pastor 

frank Penlck, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m, 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship __, 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m, 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m, 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 

J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m 

GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School :-_ 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(First and Third Sundays) 



SCRIPTURE: Acta 8:4—11:18. 
DEVOTIONAL READING: Romans 1: 
21-30. 



Unto All Men 

Lesson for January 29, 1950 



WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Giover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMillian, Supt. 

Sunday School _. 10:00 a. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a 

B, T. U 6:45 p 

Evening WorsTRp 7:30 p 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p 



Prices 
all can 
afford ! 



m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 



ST. PATRICK CHURCH. VERONA 

Rev. Henry. A. Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month 8:30 a. m, 

2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m 

3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m 

4th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m 
5th Sunday of month — 8:30 a. m 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People s= — 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. — 7:30 p. m. 



ALL SAINTS MISSION. WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
2nd Sunday of month — 8:30 a. m. 
3rd Sunday of month. __ 10:00 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 
J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship — L 7:30 p. m. 




KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 

Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. — 8:00 p..m. 

Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 

— Services Every Sunday — 

INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed. 8:00 p. m. 



SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Don Smith, Pastor 
Bible Sohool ^ 10:00 a. 

Morning Service 11:00 a. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. — 7:30 p. 

RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 
Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday Sohool 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m. 



m 
m 
in 
m 



LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 

BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

. (Every 4th Sunday) 



NEW BANK LICET BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U : 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday Sohool 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Services 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:30 P- m - 

Evening Services 7:30 p. am. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. — 7:30 p. m. 



"lWfARK TIME, Christian Sol- 
* Y * diers," is not a Christian 
hymn. The word is "Onward, Chris- 
tian Soldiers!" The command was 
given by no less a person than 
Jesus himself: "Go and make dis- 
ciples of all nations, baptizing 
them ... teaching 
them . . ." (Matt. 
28:19, 20) Do you 
know some one in 
the church who 
says h e doesn't 
believe in mis- 
sions? Such a man 
does not take 
Christ seriously. If 
you do believe in 
Christ then his Dr - Foreman 
commands are for you to obey, not 

to ignore. « 

• • • 

When Men Delay 

UP TO NOW, the church has 
been playing around with Jesus' 
command. Very few denominations 
are actually putting any large 
amount of money or manpower into 
obeying Christ's command to go 
into all the world. 

One fairly typical American de- 
nomination contributed last year 
to all benevolences, that is to all 
causes not in their own local con- 
gregations, . the sum of $9,137,065. 
That sounds like a lot; but divided 
by the total number of members 
it boils down to $14.03 per member 
for the year, or less than five cents 
a day. 

And of course not all that 
big sum of five cents went to 
missions of any sort. Yet that 
denomination gives more per 
capita to missions than most 
others do. When a man. who 
gives less than five cents a day 
to carry the good news of 
Christ into the wide world 
sings "Onward, Christian Sol- 
diers!" or prays "Thy King- 
dom come!" how much does 
he mean it? Not a nickel's 
worth! 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday Sohool 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-Bible Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 

STAFFORDSBURG CHURCH 

Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m. 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 

Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School ,9:30 a. m 

Worship Service 10:30 a. m 



the Facilities, 
the Experience, 
and the Ability 
to give the 
Finest in funeral 
service! 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

FUNERAL HOMES . 
Walton, Ky. Florence, Ky. 

Phone 352 Phone 193 




| l ^Aviwai] 



THE BEST PLACE 

E A T 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 



623-625 Madison Ave. 




For A Rainy Day! 



Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as little as $1.00! 

Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON, KY. 



DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday. 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 



CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN-^CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Walter Kidwell, Supt. 

Sunday School _. 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 

CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt.— Harvey Hughes 

Sunday School ___ 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship ' 11:15 ■ a. in. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



I 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 

1038 Madison Ave.. Covington. Ky. 

—HEmlock 7980— 

Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Rcry 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



♦ 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 





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mpenb 
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501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINGTON, KY. 




Or take the question- of man- 
power. The same denomination 
send3 out as' missionaries, every 
year, as many men and women as 
are sent by some denominations 
three times its size. And yet, even 
so, the total number of ordained 
ministers in that denomination 
who are foreign missionaries is 
only 4 per cent of their total num- 
ber of ministers. 

"Go into all the world," said the 
Master. "Four per cent of us will," 
we reply, "the rest of us will stay 

at home." , '. » i 

• '• • 

When Men Obey 

AS A MATTER OF FACT; even 
the earliest church was slow 
to pay real attention to Christ's 
command", Forward I Men are 
strange creatures. And one of the 
strange things about us is that we 
often have to be scared into doing 
our duty. * 

It took the persecution set off by 
the death of Stephen to move the 
Christians in Jerusalem out along 
the roads south, north, east, any- 
where to get away from the city of 
death. Everywhere they went, they 
told the story of Jesus. 

But at first it was an rather 
breathless and Informal. "Why 
are you here?" one of these 
DP's would be asked, as be 
was passing through Samaria t 
or Antioch or Alexandria, per- 
haps in the bread-line, perhaps 
looking for a place to work and 
settle down. "I'm a refugee 
from Jerusalem," he would 
say. "But why?" "Well, Pm a 
Christian." "Whafs that?" ., 

So the story would be told all 
over again, the good news about 
God's grace in Christ. So the 
church spread. Today, though an 
enormous part of the world's pop- 
ulation is still unwon, there are 
Christians in so many lands that 
the Bible— all or parts of- it— has 
had to be translated into more than 
one thousand different languages 

and dialects. . * 

. « •■•'■. 

Unto All Men 

ONE OF THE MOST interesting 
and surpassing little books of 
recent years is called "They Found 
the Church There," by H. P. Van 
Dusen. It is the dramatic story of 
how the American GI, to his great 
astonishment, found Christians in 
the most unexpected places. 

It Is a tremendous mistake 
to Uttafc that the Christian re- 
ligion is only for English-speak- 
ing peoples, or for Europeans, 
or for white people. It began 
among people whom most read- 
ers of this column would set 
down*as 'foreigners." 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 




The lad in this picture has been into some kind 
of mischief, and hit dad has called him "on the 
carpet" Hit drooping heed and downward gate 
( suggest a consciousness of wrongdoing. 

These are always tense moments in parent and 
child relation!, became they Involve a meeting of 
pertonalltiet In a situation which might easily 
serve to strengthen or weaken the parental tie. 

Thlt It no occatlon for parental anger, arrogance, 
or Mutter. The eltuatlon callt for a sympathetic 
understanding, a calm appraisal, and good judg- 
ment bated on the moral and tplrltual elementt in 
human conduct. 

Parents need the wisdom of God and tplrltual 
guidance In dealing with the behavior problemt of 
their children. Mlttaket made In thete clrcum- 
ttancet often lead to unfortunate results. 
^ The counsel of the Church and the Intplratlon 
of the Scripturet is offered to every parent who 
seeks divine guidance In meeting the retponslbUltlet 
of parenthood. 



THE CHURCH FOR ALL . . . 
AU FOR THE CHURCH 

Tb» Church Is the greatest fas- 
ter on earth lor the building oi 
character end good citizenship. It 
1> a storehouse oi spiritual values. 
Without a strong Church, neither 
democracy nor civilization can 
survive. There are four sound 
reasons why every person should 
attend services regularly and tup- 
port the Church. They are: (1) 
For his irjwn sake. (2) For his 
children's sake. (3) For the sake 
of his community and nation. (4) 
For the sake of the Church itself, 
which needs his moral and ma- 
terial support. Plan to go to 
church regularly and read your 
Bible daily. 

Book Chapter Verses 

Sunday... Proverbs 22 14 

Monday... Ephealans « Uk 

Tuesday... Proverbs 6 20-24 

Wednesday I Corinthians 3 10-17 

Thursday ..Proverbs 3 ».; 

Friday . I Kings It 1-4 

Saturday. . Matthew « s-15 



tat 1850. S. s. Kelitw. Buub 



Linton's Barber Shop 

Walton, Kentucky 



Florence Deposit Bank 

Florence. Kentucky 



Walton Lumber Co. 
Phonr Walton 19 



Hamilton and Jones 

Walton. Kentucky 



Conrad Hardware 

For Service. Large or Small. See Powers 



Dixie State Bank 

Walton. Kentucky 



Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence, Kentucky 



Dixie Chevrolet Sales 
Phone Walton 85 



Meador's Grocery 
Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables. Meats 

■s ^ 

' ' I 

Walton & Readnour 
Coal - Feed - Seed Phone Walton 154 



Roberts Grocery 

Where You Get Quality and Price 



Community Public Service Co., Inc. 

Walton. Kentucky 




e* 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



I INDEPENDENCE 

Mrs. John C. Cain, who has been 
suffering from virus pneumonia, re- 
turned home from the hospital last 
week. 

Mrs. J. C. Reynolds has recently 
returned home from the hospital. 

The body of H. L. Delfendahl was 
brought from Lakeland and funeral 
services were held in Cincinnati, 



For the Besf In Heating 

phon o 

J arman Heating Service 

WALTON ... 524 or 921 
Engineered Heating— Coed, OIL 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



Thursday, January 26, 1950- 



last Saturday. The community ex- 
tends sympathy to the family. 

Mrs. Eunice Deglow, daughter of 
AM Armstrong, went to the Booth 
Hospital last Thursday. 

Mrs. Mary Collins had X-ray pic- 
tures made last week. 

Clarence Davis, brother of Mrs. 
Frank Cox, is in a critical condition 
in the hospital at Georgetown. 

Mrs. W. E. Sims is going soon to 
the Jewish hospital In Cincinnati for 
an operation for gall stones. 

Ransom "Rackie" Auton moved in- 
to the Mrs. Pearl Williams property 
last week. 

E. A. Palmiter of Erlanger will be 
the guest speaker at the Men's 
Brotherhood meeting to be held In 
the Independence Baptist Church, 
7:00 p. m., Thursday, Jan. 26. Mr. 
Palmiter will also arrange for spec- 
ial music for the occasion. 

The number of rural homes in 
Caldwell county serviced by REA 

fell »!«?i r 4£ curj!enXmoifi.*h^ix.dfluhl-. 
ed last year. 

It is estimated that 90% of Scott 
county com the past year was Ky. 
102, 103 or U. S. 13. 






Farms For Sale 

NEAR FLORENCE— 26 acres on State Highway; 8-room house, dairy 
barn with 20 stanchions, milk house and all necessary outbuild- 
ings, wonderful location, bus service, lot ofrfoad frontage: price 
$12,000. 

137 ACRES — Boone county, State Highway; 7-room modern house, 
new 4-room tenant house, large combination barn equipped for 
dairy, new milk house, good tobacco barn racked off, one other 
barn, stripping room, double garage with storage space, brooder 
huse, chicken house, 2 smoke houses, corn crib; tobacco base 
2.6 acres; most all tractor land; this is a nice farm; price $25,000. 

103 ACRES — 8 miles from Florence; 5-room hpuse, feed barn and 
tobacco barn; plenty of outbuildings; tobacco base 2.4 acres; 
price $13,000. 

KENTON COUNTY— 141 acres; 5-room house, large combination 
bapn (16 cow stanchions), milk house, shipping grade "A" milk, 
chicken house 20x20, smoke house with basement, also other 
outbuildings, 12 acres alfalfa, everlasting water, large orchard, 
tobacco base 1.9 acres, one-half tractor land; this is a good strong 
farm, will produce plenty of bluegrass; price $11,500. 

146 ACRES — 7 miles from Florence, just off Route 42, on good road; 
good 5-room house, combination barn fixed for dairy, milk house, 
plenty of outbuildings, three ponds; new base 1.9 acres; this is 
all tractor land; price $17,800. 

137 ACRES— -Located on State Road, 17 miles from Florence; 2 sets 
i, of buildings, equipped for dairy, all necessary outbuildings and 
plenty water; tobacco base 2.6 acres; price $10,500. 

GRANT COUNTY— 136 acres, located on blacktop road; 7-room 
modern house, good combination" barn and a number of good 
outbuildings, well watered; this farm will grow alfalfa and blue 
grass; has 12 acres alfalfa; tobacco base 2.2 acres; everlasting 
water; price $17,000; will also sell all tools and livestock sep- 
arately, if purchaser desires. 

84 ACRES — Near Verona; 7-room modern house, barn with nine 
cow stanchions, milk house, nice outbuildings, all in grass but 
seven acres; base 2.1 acres; price $13,750. 

160 ACRES— Near Walton, on State Highway; dandy 7-room house 
with water; silo, dairy barn, milk house, tobacco barn, stripping 
room, new double garage, double corn crib, smoke house, brooder 
house, new laying house, mound cellar; tobacco base 2.2 acres* 
15 acres wheat, 15 acres alfalfa, 30 acres mixed hay, 6 acres 
timber, rest of farm tillable; 2 newly developed springs with 
concrete troughs, pond and small lake, 2 cisterns; price $26,500. 

80 ACRES— 12 miles from twon; 6-room house, barn, tool shed, four 
other outbuildings; all in grass but 5 acres; tobacco base 8 
acre; price $7,500. 

45 ACRES— 10 miles from Florence, on State Highway, bus service; 
4-room house, combination barn, new milking parlor, tobacco 
base 1.4 acres; price $6,000. 

NEAR WALTON— .Kenton county; 62 acres, 7-room house, part base- 
ment, combination barn, 12 cow stanchions, milk house, shopping 
grade "A" milk, double garage, chicken house, smbke house, 
brooder house, milk cooler, 6 milk cans, tobacco base 1.5 acres- 
price $11,000. , ' , ' 

38^ ACRES— 8 miles from Florence, on State rSgikWay; 6-room 

c^I^ 2 barns ' 145 fruit ,trees - tractor and equipment; price 
$10,800. 

FLORENCE — 4-room house and bath, modern kitchen with tile 
floor, hardwood floors, storm windows and doors, Venetian 
shades, full basement, drive-in garage, gas furnace, city water 
lot 60x200, close to bus; price $8,850. Loan can be transferred for 
$6,500 at 4% interest— payments will be between $40 and $45 
per month. 

R. P. COLEMAN 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION SALES 

U. S. HIGHWAY 42 FLORENCE. KY. 

Phone: Florence 347 or 148 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



SEE 

NEED FAM | L y FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



BEAVER LICK 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baker, Jr., 
Bonnie and Ralphie were visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Kemper of Glen- 
coe, Monday night. 

Rev. V. V. Hill and wife' were in 
Lexington, last Wednesday. 

Several from here attended he 
surprise shower in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Brown at their home in 
Walton, Friday night. -~ 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Volker and son 
were Saturday guests, of Mr. and 
Mrs. R. P. Moore and- son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Houston and 
family moved to Marvin Hudson's 
farm last week and Mr. and Mrs. 
Pete Black moved in their new home. 

Wilmington Missionary Meet 

The Missionary Society of the Wil- 
mington Baptist Church met Wed- 
nesday,- January -irar Hhe" Thome" "oT 
Mrs. Lucy Beighle at Piner. 

The meeting was opened by sing- 
ing, "To the Work." The devotional 
was given by Mrs. W. R. Brown, and 
prayer was offered by Mrs. C. Ci 
Gross. The program was in charge 
of Mrs. Ray Linder, with several of 
the members taking part. 

Twenty-seven cards were sent to 
the sick and nine calls were made. 
A box of food was given a needy 
family in the community. The group 
was dismissed for lunch by Mrs. 
Newel Spegal. 

Miss Estther Coon, a returned Mis- 
sionary from French West Africa, 
spoke in the afternoon, showing 
picture slides and telling of her work 
in that country. Miss Coon dismiss- 
ed the assemblage with prayer. 

The next meeting, will be in the 
home of Mrs. Tred McMillian. 

The following members were pres- 
ent: Mrs. W. W. Hanker, Mrs. B. N. 
Spegal, Mrs. Harry Yancey, Mrs. 
Newel Spegal, Mrs. R. W. Elliott, 
Mrs. James Kidwell, Mrs. Robert 
Bell, Mrs. Wilfred Beighle, Mrs. Ray 
Linder, Mrs. Malcolm Oliver, Mrs. 
Fred McMillian, Mrs. Marion Collins, 
Mrs. Foster Bridges, Mrs. Eugene 
Beighle, Mrs. C. C. Gross, Mrs. E. H. 
Spaulding, Mrs. James Beighle, Mrs. 
W. R. Brown, Mrs. C. Spegal, and 
a visitor, Miss Esther Coon. 



Piner Homemakers 

The Piner Homemakers Club held 
its January meeting in the home of 
Mrs. Willard Shropshire at Indepen- 
dence. Mrs. Wm. Wolterman, presi- 
dent, called the meeting to order. 
Roll call was answered by members 
telling of "New Year Resolutions 
that: have never been broken." 

After the business session and re- 
ports of committees, Miss Zelma E. 
Byerly, Home Demonstration Agent, 
made announcements and a short 
talk on some of the projects of other 
clubs. 



Several letters from England were 
disrlbuted to members of the club, 
who wished to correspond with 
Homemakers of that country. 

Miss Lucille Hemper of Lexing- 
ton, sister of Mrs. Shropshire, spoke 
on (the North Atlantic Pact, stressing 
article five, which was very edu- 
cational. 

Miss Esther Coon, a returned Mis- 
sionary to French West Africa, gave 
a very interesting talk on customs 
and the life of» Homemakers in that 
country, which everyone enjoyed 
very much. 

Those present were: Mrs. W. R. 
Brown, Mrs. Owen Flynh, Mts. Wil 
lard Benson, Mrs. William Wolter 
man, Mrg. O. Fisk, Mrs. R. W. Elliott, 
Mrs. Charles Plynn, Mrs. Steve Rich, 
Mrs. Carl Justice, Mrs. A. Pelzzari, 
Mrs. E. H. Spaulding, Mrs. James 
Kidwell, Mrs. Malcolm Oliver, Mrs, 
C. V. Mullins, Mrs. C. C. Gross, Mrs 
Willard Shrosphire, Miss Zelma By- 
erly, and two visitors, Miss Esther 
Coon and Mi ss -LttcfMe- Hemper."" 

Honored On Birthdays 

Mrs. W. R. Miller and sister, Mrs. 
W. S. Mitchell were hostesses to a 
number of relatives Saturday even- 
ing at the home of the former, the 
honor guests being their sister, Mrs. 
J. K. Ammerman, and Rev. W. S. 
Mitchell, who were celebrating bir- 
thdays. The menu consisted of tur- 
key and the usual accessories, ice 
cream and the traditional birthday 
cake. Guests included A. J. Renaker 
and family, Mrs. Russell Mitchell, 
W. R. Miller, Trooper "R. R. Miller, 
J. K. Ammerman, and family, and 
Dr. Wm. T. Lee of Cynthiana; Rev. 
W. S. Mitchell and family and Misses 
Jeanette Jones and Aleen Courtney 
of Covington; Miss Glen Marie Tan- 
ner, Miss Mary J. Renaker, and fri- 
end, Fred Disdifco of Ludlow; A. P. 
Renaker of Covington, and the 
hostesses. We join in wishing the 
celebrants many happy returns of 
the day. 

Elmer Kinder of Rowan county 
made more (than $15 a day for every 
day that he primed his tobacco, he 
told his county agent. 

Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



TOBACCO GROWERS TO 
MEET AT CONVENTION 

The principal program for farm- 
ers at the annual Farm and Home 
Convention at Lexington on Friday, 
the last day, will be devoted to to- 
bacco production. 

New and improved kinds to grow, 
use of fertiligers to step up yields 
and improve quality, control of in- 
sects and diseases, curing, grading 



and other factors in produci^ bet- 
ter leaf will be discussed. 

Among speakers will be W. D_ 
Valleau, Russell Hunt, H. H. Jewett, 
Stephen Diadhim, Charles Bontner 
and George Byers, all of the Experi- 
ment Station at Lexington. 

The Lancaster Negro 4-H club in 
Garrard county has a membership 
of 65 boys and girls. 



INOTICE TO TRUCK OPERATORS!! 

LOAD LIMITS: 

In order to protect and save the roads of Boone 
County during the winter months, the Boone County 
Fiscal Court feels that it will be necessary to set a 
weight limit on loads carried by trucks over these 
roads during the wet winter months, and the load limit 
has been set at a weight not to exceed three tons over, 
and above, the weight of the truck. 

It is, therefore, ordered by the Court that no truck 
shall carry a load in excess of three tons over and a- 
bove the weight of the truck on any of the roads main- 
tained by the Boone County Road Department during 
wet and soft times from this date to April 15, 1950. 

The above restriction applies to all Rural Blacktop 
Roads and other County Roads, but does not apply to 
State or Federal Highways in the County. 

BOONE COUNTY FISCAL COURT! 




When The Crash 

Comer - Be 

Protected 



P~^&tutual Insurance 
^r Company 

i. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON. KY. 



L J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

and 

OPTICIAN 



nafrenue 



631 Madison 
Covingto 
HEmlock 0535 

Office Hours ... 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 





PISTONS and SLEEVES 
Mean More Power... Save Oil and Fuel 



# Now's the time to let us put that like-new zip and 
power back into your tractor*. A set of factory- 
matched IH pistons and sleeves will do the trick 
quicker and cheaper than anything we know. 

A new piston-and-sleeve job will soon pay for 
itself in the extra work you get done, in lower oper- 
ating costs and in slashed-down oil and fuel con- 
sumption. Besides, you'll have a tractor that's a 
pleasure to drive . . . runs clean and smooth . . . digs 
into the toughest jobs with power to spare. 1 

Bring your tractor in for an engine checkup today. 
Our servicemen will give it their expert and un- 
hurried attention now and have it in tip-top shape 
fox the busy season. 



Let us install IH Matched Sets 

TODAY! 

Factory-matched 
IH pistons and 
sleeves are made 
of a close-grained, 
extremely hard 
alloy that will take 
endless hours of 
punishment. They 
are ground to a 
precision fit and 
mirror-like finish 
for better com- 
pression and 
greater economy. 
You can't make a 
better investment. 




SPECIALSERV1CE0FFER 

FOR THIS MONTH 

Factory-matched pistons and 
sleeves installed for only 



Calvin Cress & Sons 

Burlington, Ky. Phone 79 



BABY CHICKS 
ARE HERE! 

Licensed and Approved by Kentucky Department of Agriculture 



OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 
WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 
POULTRY LITTER .. REMEDIES 

TUXEDO FEEDS 

Garden Seed - Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 



Thursday, January 26, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 



f FL 



FLORENCE 



The Ladies Auxiliary of the Flor- 
ence Fire Department wish to thank 
each and every one who helped In 
any way to make the blng social the 
success that it was the past week. 
They will look forward to seeing you 
again the third week In February 
for the next social. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Davis (nee Mary 
Helen Thompson) are being congrat- 



ulated upon the arrivel of a baby 
daughter the past week at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital. 

Friends in the community were 
sorry to learn that William L. Oliver 
rural carrier on Route 2, was hospit- 
alized the past week at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital for observation. We wish 
him a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Lockwood 
and family entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Larry Aylor and daughter on 
Saturday evening. 

Mrs. Viola Idol is visiting relatives 
and friends in Indiana. 



Laboratory Test 



of 



Walton Block Co 



WALTON, KENTUCKY 

(January 19, 1950) 



Block No. 2 

Light, fine 

Weight: 42»/ 4 lbs. 

Size: 153/ 4 x73/ 4 x73/ 4 

Compressive Strength: 
1,434 per inch 



Block No. 1 

Dark, coarse 

Weight: 4iy 4 lbs. 

Size: 153/4x73/4x73/4 

Compressive Strength: 
1,139 per inch 



Tested by R. E. Shaver, University of Kentucky 

Civil Engineer 




Willie Thall gets the willie-aillies as the razor's edge wielded by 
Willie Nimmo gets close. Nimmo is a WLW announcer and Thall is 
the partner of Ruth Lyons on the "Morning Matinee" weekday pro* 
eram over WLW at 8:30 a.m.. EST. — h— 



ed at various locations East, West 
and South. Mr. Taylor landed a 23- 
inch bass, while Mrs. Taylor caught 
a sailfish weighing 90 lbs. 

Blayne Miller and Barbee Simpson 
were guests Sunday of the former's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. Miller 
of Price Road. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Fogel of near 
Villa Madonna and Mr. and Mrs. 
John Pierce and daughter of Bullitts- 
ville attended services at the Flor- 
ence Methodist Church, Sunday 
morning. 

Mrs. L. J. Thompson was called to 
Terre Haute, Ind., by the Illness of 
her sister. 

Mrs. Arthur Ammon is recovering 
from a dislocated knee joint, the re- 
sult of a fall from a stepladder. 



J VERONA I 

Mr. and Mrs. Pat Sturdivent went 
to Covington, Monday for a check-up 
by the doctor of Mr. Sturdivent. 

Mrs. Lizzie Noel went to Coving- 
ton, Monday (for her treatment. 

John Ashcraft, who has been in 
the hospital, returned home last 
week and is feeling some better. 

Callers in the J. T. Lamn home on 
Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Roy 
Lamn, Lana and Blanche Lamn of 
Covington, and Mr. and Mrs. W. E. 
Waller and son. 

W. E. Waller and son were in 
Walton Monday afternoon on bus- 
iness and Mrs. Waller was calling 
on Mrs. John Woods. 



Mr. and Mrs. Cam Kennedy have 
moved from their farm on Gun- 
powder to their new location at 
Beaver Lick, Walton, Star Route, 
They will be missed in the commun- 
ity. 

Friends In the community are 
pleased to welcome back Victor 
Bruner to the teaching staff of the 



Public Sale 



. <t 



I will sell at Public Auction on 



Monday, Jan. 30 

Beginning at 12:30 P. M. 

At Fiskburg, Ky. 

ON LLL HIGHWAY - KENTON COUNTY • 

A stock of General Merchandise, including Groceries, 
Small Hardware and DryGoods ; some household effects 
including Coal Range, Cabinet Sink, Screen Doors and 
Window Screens. 

Terms: Cash 

Chas. Under 

OWNER 




GRINDS 
MORE I EED 

Per Horse Power 



HAMMER TIPS 

STAY NEW 



T.t. ELLIOTT 

J. I. Case^Sales, Parts & Service 

BRACHT STATION, XT. 

Phone Ind. 6545 



Condensed Statement 

PEOPLES DEPOSIT BANK 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 
At the close of business December 31, 1949. 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Mortgages $ 9984)23.24 

U. S. Government Bonds .- 1.084.600.P0 

Federal Land Bank Bonds 84.812.50 

Overdrafts — k. — ._ None 

Banking Rouse and Lot _ 10.000.00 

Furniture and Fixtures 1.00 

Cash and Due from Banks 401,567.52 

Total ^ ^ $2,579,004.26 



. LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock . $ 50.000.00 

Surplus W0JOO0J0& 1 * 

Undivided Profits 62.129.06 

Deposits __ 2J66.875.2d 

Total _„ SSW79.875J6 



'T.* 



**1 



— Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation — 

4% semi-annual dividends paid to stockholders June 30th and Dec 31st. plus 3% extra Dec. 31st 

Trust Department Savings Accounts 



Florence school. He has returned 
to fill a recent vacancy. 

The annual polio drive, known as 
the "March of Dirhes," is under way 
in the county. Contributions are 
badly needed at this time, due to the 
heavy drain on the funds during the 
past year. When the representative 
calls at your home, won't you be 
generous? If you are not at home 
when your home is solicited, please 
send your contribution to Ben Ztm- 
mer, Jr., or to Mrs. George Morith. 

We wish to welcome the Leo J.' 
Brophy Insurance Agency, located 
in the Florence Building & Loan 
Bldg. You will also find the McEvoy 
Bros, law office in the same building. 

Clifford Tanner, sub-carrier, is 
carrying the mail on Route 2, in the 
absence of W. L. Oliver, who is ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Taylor returned 
on Friday from a two weeks vaca- 
tion in Tavares, Fla. They reported 
a most enjoyable trip. 

Friends of Mrs. Isabella Hufnagle 
regreFTnat she is confined to a hos- 
pital and hope for her hasty recov- 
ery. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Taylor have ar- 
rived home following a pleasant va- 
cation and sojourn in Florida. They 
state the temperature there was a- 
round 82 degrees and that they fish- 




Saturday, January 28 - 1:00 p. m. 

125-Acre Farm. 5-Room Home, Barn and Outbuildings 
3 Ponds. 1 Well and 2 Cisterns 

Just One Mile from the Dixie Highway (U. S. 25) 

On Lincoln Ridge Road, 5 Miles Southeast of 

WILL1AMSTOWN, KY. - GRANT CO. 

Stella Mae Blackburn, the owner, has signed an Absolute Auc- 
tion contract with us to sell this farm at Absolute Auction on the 
above date. Farm will be sold in two parcels, with right reserved 
to group them. 

PARCEL NO. 1 — 5-roomhome and outbuildings, 30 acres of land, 
on the south side of Lincoln Ridge Road. 

PARCEL NO. 2 — 95 acres and barn, on the north side of Lincoln 
Ridge Road. 

FREE— To the Lucky Ticket Holder— A FAT PIG! 
ENTERTAINMENT — By Frank Miller and His Kentucky Fiddlers! 

REL C. WAYMAN & SONS 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION BROKERS 
623 Washington St., Covington HE 5107; Ind. 5064 

Agent: Baxter Blair, Williamstown 2679 

Auctioneer: Cecil Wayman, JUniper 4895 

WANT ACTION? AUCTION IT! 



AUCTION 

5 Rooms of Furniture 

Saturday, Jan. 28 

1O0 P. M. 

Verona, Ky. - Boone Co. 

NEAR CORNER OF OLD L. & N. DEPOT 

I have sold my house and have listed with Bradford & Worthington 
Auction Company, the following property: 

1 Piano; 2 Wool Rugs; small Coal Cooking Stove; Dining Room 
Suite; 1 Couch; a lot of Dishes and Glassware; lot of odd Chairs; some 
Cherry furniture, and a lot of valuable Antique pieces. 

Terms: Cash Day of Sale! 

Mrs. Nannie O'Hara 

Sale Conducted By 

BRADFORD-WORTHINGTON AUCTION CO. 



FLORENCE, KY. 



PHONES: Florence 229; Walton 671 



COL. LUTE BRADFORD & COL. A. F. WORTHINGTON, AUCT. 
LUCIAN BRADFORD, CLERK 



I 



I 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



FOR SALE— Custom Aire oil heat- 
ing stove, 40,000 B. T. U. Phoenix 
Hotel, Walton, Ky. 2t-4* 

YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7H3. . tf -46 



FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
First class work, guaranteed, good 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf-2 



FOR SALE— Baled soy bean hay. 
Phone Walton 29. . 2t-3 

FOR SALE— Hotpoint electric range, 
$60.00, good condition. COlonial 
7064. 2t-3 



FOR SALE' — 1941 1%-ton Dodge 
truck, '46 motor, metal covered 
body, 8.25 tires, 2-speed axle, and 
booster brakes; a real bargain. 
Harold Menke, Phoenix Hotel, 
Walton. Phone 29. 2t-4* 



FOR SALE— Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. tf-1 



FOR SALEn-Baled hay, first, second 
and third .cutting alfalfa, priced 
right for quick sale. Duokhead 
Inn. Walton, Ky., Route 2. Phone 
Walton 288. 3t-2* 



Thursday, January 26, 1950 



FOR SALE — 4-wheel rubber tired 
wagon, new 6x12 flat bed, and 
good tires, $95; 2- wheel trailer, ex- 
cellent condition. Phone Ind. 7430. 

lt-4* 



FOR SALE — Warm Morning stoves. 
Call Walton 774. Priced $20 each. 

4t-4» 



Farms For Sale 

NEAR FLORENCE— 26 acres oh State Highway; 8-room house, dairy 
barn with 20 stanchions, milk house and all necessary outbuild- 
ings, wonderful location, bus service, lot of road frontage; price 
«pXz,000. 

137 ACRES— Boone county, State Highway; 7-room modern house, 
new. 4-room tenant house, large combination barn equipped for 
dairy, new milk house, good tobacco barn racked off, one other 
barn, stripping room, double garage with storage space, brooder 
huse, chicken house, 2 smoke houses, corn crib; tobacco base 
2.6 acres; most all tractor land; this is a nice farm; price $25,000. 

103 ACRES— 8 miles from Florence; 5-room house, feed barn and 
tobacco barn; plenty- of outbuildings; tobacco base 2.4 acres- 
price $13,000. . 

KENTON COUNTY— 141 acres; 5-room house, large combination 
barn (16 cow stanchions), milk house, shipping grade "A" milk 
chicken house 20x20, smoke house with basement, also other 
^outbuildings, 12 acres alfalfa, everlasting water, large orchard 
tobacco base 1.9 acres, one-half tractor land; this is a good strong 
farm, will produce plenty of bluegrass; price $11,500.. 

146 ACRES— 7 miles from Florence, just off Route 42, on good road; 
good 5-room house, combination barn fixed for dairy, milk house 
plenty of outbuildings, three ponds; new base 1.9 acres; this is 
all tractor land; price $17,800. 

137 ACRES— Located on State Road, 17 miles from Florence; 2 sets 
of buildings, equipped for dairy, all necessary outbuildings and 
plenty water; tobacco base 2.6 acres; price $10,500. - 

GRANT COUNTY— 136 acres, located on blacktop road; 7-room 
modern house, good combination barn and a number of good 
outbuildings, well watered; this farm will grow alfalfa and .blue 
grass; has 12 acres alfalfa; tobacco base 2.2 acres; everlastine 
water; price $17,000; will also sell all tools and livestock sen 
arately, if purchaser desires. 

84 ACRES— Near Verona; 7-room modern house, barn with nine 
cow stanchions, milk house, nice outbuildings, all in grass but 
seven acres; base 2.1 acres; price $13,750. 

160 ACRES— Near Walton, on State Highway; dandy 7-room house 
with water; silo, dairy barn, milk house, tobacco barn, stripping 
room, new double garage, double corn crib, smoke house, brooder 
house, new layTng house, mound cellar; tobacco base 2.2 acres- 
15 acres wheat, 15 acres alfalfa, 30 acres mixed hay, 6 acres 
timber, rest of farm tillable; 2 newly developed springs with 
concrete troughs, pond and small lake, 2 cisterns; price $26,500. 

80 ACRES— 12 miles fromtwon; 6-room house, barn, tool shed, four 
other outbuildings; all in grass but 5 acres; tobacco base 8 
acre; price $7,500. v 

45 ACRES— 10 miles from Florence, on State Highway, bus service- 
s-room house, combination barn, new milking parlor, tobacco 
base 1.4 acres; price $6,000. ' "**"*.' looacco 

NEAR WALTON— Kenton county; 62 acres, 7-room house, part base- 

£!E& C ° m . bln ?, t , l0 ^ ba l I J' 12 cow ^anohions, milk house, shopping 
grade A milk, double garage, chicken house, smoke house 

price^l 000 e ' milk . cooler ' 6 milk cails ' tobacco base 1.5 acres;' 

38% ACRES— 8 miles from Florence, on State Highway; 6-room 

$1°0 U 800 nS ' 145 frU " treeS ' traCt ° r 3nd ^Pment; P ri ce 

PLORENCE-4-room house and bath, modern kitchen with tile 
tloor, hardwood floors, storm windows and doors Venetian 
shades, full basement, drive-in garage, gas furnace citv water 

Ifi^^VJ ^ b f : price *** ^^SSSte 
$6,500 at 4% interest— payments will be between $40 and $45 
per month. ^ ^ J 

R. P. COLEMAN 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION SALES 

U.S. HIGHWAY 42 FLORENCE. KY. 

Phone: Florence 347 or 148 




SELL YOUR TOBACCO WITH THE . . . NEW 

KENTUCKIANA 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

The Modern House with Uniform Light! 

Carrollton, Ky. 

TOBACCO SOLD ON SALE JANUARY 10, 1950: 

mm t> Lbs - Av S- 

Allen Rogers 1686 $59.73 

Theodore Miller __ 2050 53.42 

Hubert Steingrubber ; 53.29 

William Burns J ZZ Z 3096 54 GO 

George Wernz i 6 56 53.00 

H. Brady and E. E. Klopp 508 51.59 

Klopp and Klopp ^___ 2122 52*1)0 

Charles Speagle 3336 51.00 

Paul Chaney and L. Congleton 1552 53.73 

Charles Chambers 57.83 

R. Kittle and Hubert Vimp ui8 SIM 

E. Kippler and C. Shinkle _X_ _ 394 53 69 

H. Catlett and BUly Catlett 690 S12Z 

C. M. Waller and Bobby Turner 1288 51.54 

Lehman Goodridge 970 56*81 

Mary V. Gaines and Matt GiiUKbi~~S-Z-Z 1086 50*98 

Webster and Jones 1002 51.60 

A. Hensley ~~ 980 SIJ8J 

B. C. and B. W. Gaines and Willard Hodges 2484 55.26 
B. C. and B. W. Gaines and Edward Black 2566 56.97 

R. L. Vincent, Exor. and R. demons _ 3128 56*72 

H. C, Hedger _t 1882 56.53 

C H. and Russell Baker ._ 920 • 50.65 

Win. Cox and John Wilson 2092 53.74 

Henry Siekman, J. Taggert and S. Allen __ 4300 52*38 

Anna Trisler and Ray Scxoggin __'__r\ 2218 56.21 

Everett Oatman and E. Vantyle 2924 53.37 

£™ A i* D COOK GENERAL MANAGER 

OTHA COOK , fc FIELD AGENT 

JOE DUNCAN & DAVE GAINES •_ AUCTIONEERS 

£«£ J JP Y FLOOR MANAGER 

PHIL E. STALLARD WEIGHMAN 

HAROLD HEDGER BOOKKEEPER 



WASTED TO BUY— Several 1000 ft. 
of Ash, Oak and Walnut lumber 
in the tree. Call Florence 419. 
r » tf-50 

FOR SALE— All kinds of OakLum- 
ber, fancing planks. All types of 
dressed lumber. Stevens Lumber 
dealer, Phone Florence 419. tf-50 



14 High Grade Cows and 1 Male 



FOR SALE or TRADE— Bay walking 
mare, sound and gentle, for small 
pony or cattle. Dawson E. High- 
tower, Walton, Route 1. Phone 
Ind. 7284. 2t-4* 

SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE— All nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest Independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf-1 



FOR SALE— First, second and third 
cutting of alfalfa, baled; timothy 
and clover; also timothy and clov- 
er, mixed. McBee Bros., Williams 
•town. Phone Williamstown 4192 
or 4073. 8t-4* 

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — It works, 
it pays, it gets calves. Sign up in 
the Boone County Artificial Breed 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay 
lor, Walton 582. tf-45 

FOR SALE — Looking for appliances, 
such as Refrigerators, ^Washers, 
Deep Freeze, Heaters, Radios, used 

. or new, call Independence 6585 
Myron Stephens. 40t-47* 



FOR RENT— rPower Chain Saws withj 
one man $3.50 per hour. Phone 
Florence 419. tf-50 



In Pike county, there are 54 4-H 
clubs with approximately 3,100 
members. 

Art the Lexington tobacco show 
and sale, 4-H'ers sold 16,550 pounds 
of tobacco for an average of $44.33 
per hundred. 

Byron Honsucker of Letcher coun 
ty has ordered 1,000 loblolly pine 
trees to set out in, the spripg. 

More than 300 dairymen in Camp 
bell county belong to the Cooperative 
Pure Milk Association, selling milk 
fo the Greater Cincinnati area. 

Furniture refinished by Russell 
county homemakers included 57 
chairs, a. piano and several chests 
and tables. 



Beginning at 
12:00 Noon 

1 Mile West of Verona, Ky. 

On Porter Road— Turn Right in Verona and Turn Left at First Road 

, Having decided to quit the dairy business,, I will sell my entire herd 
consisting of the following cows: w v «' 

1 large 5 -year-old Guernsye cow, wilRje fresh by day of sale; 1 half - 
Guernsey and half Brown Swiss heifer, first calf by side; 1 Jersey, 5 
years old, giving 5 gallons per day; 1 Brown Swiss heifer, giving 4 gal- 
Jons per day; 1 Milking Shorthorn, 5 years old, calf by side; 1 Jersey, 
6 years old, giving good flow of milk; Brown Swiss, 5 years old, will 
freshen first of March ; 2 half Brown Swiss heifers, with calves by side; 
1 Jersey, 3 years old, giving 4 gallonsper day; 1 half Brown Swiss 
heifer, to freshen in February; 3 large yearling heifers, half Br. Swiss; 
I registered Brown Swiss bull, Featherstone's Baron Rollo, 1 1 months 
old; these cows all sound, T. B. and Bang tested; also one 4-can Milk 
Cooler, good as new; seven 10-gallon Milk Cans; Milk Pails; Wash 
Vat ; 6 tons of good Alfalfa Hay. 

W. L. SatChwill, Owner 

BRADFORD & WORTHINGTON, AUCTIONEERS 



















ADVANCE-DESIGN TRUCKS 



P. 



ERFORMANCE LEADERS 



LI 



Introducing a 
Great Load-Master "105" Engine 



It's the most powerful truck engine in 
Chevrolet history! And it's here now 
to give you a new high in on-the-job 
performance for your 1950 hauling. 

This great Load-Master Valve-in- 
Head engine with 105 horsepower 
enables you to speed up heavy-duty 
schedules — complete more deliveries 
in less time. And for light- and medi- 
um-duty hauling, Chevrolet's famed 



9 Payload Li 



ayload Leaders • 



P, 



Thrift-Master Engine also delivers 
more power with improved perform- 
ance. 

Come in and look' over these new 
Chevrolet Trucks in the light of your 
own hauling needs. See all the impor- 
tant improvements for 1950. See how 
Chevrolet offers just the model you 
want— with more power and greater 
value than ever! 



l:, 



opuiarity Leaders • 



K.c i: 



EADERS 



DIXIE CHEVROLET SALES 

Phone 95 Walton, Ky. 



-u 




Thursday, January 26, 1950 




WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hume of Wal- 
ton, entertained Sunday afternoon, 
Miss Marie Johnson of Covington and 
her friend, iRoland Newton of Fort 
Thomas, Ky. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. James C. 
Littrell (nee Betty Lou Snead) a 
daughter, Jan. 19 at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. Mother and baby doing 
nicely. The little one has been nam- 
ed Carolyn Sue. 

Mr.. and Mrs. Levi Pennington 
spent part of last week in Dayton, 
Ohio, the guests of their sons, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. R. Pennington and dau- 
ghters Joann and Vickie, and Mr 
and Mrs. R. L. Pennington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Kite and dau- 
ghter Plryilis of Richwood visited her 
, parents, Mr', and Mrs. L. C. Littrell. 
of near Verona, Saturday. 



I 



Sunday dinner guests in the home 
of Mrs. Mollie Sleet were Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Rider, Mrs. Alice Dens- 
er and son, Wilson Densler, all of 
Gallatin county; Mr. and Mrs. Ward 
Sleet and Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Mitchell and little daughter, Diana 
Lynn, ail of Indianapolis, Ind., and 
Mr. and Mrs, Robert Sleet and Mr. 
and Mrs. Malcolm Simpson. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wood spent 
Sunday with her parents, Mr. and 
Mds. R. W. Good at English. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Summey of 
Whites Tower spent Saturday night 
with Mr. and Mrs. Leo Flynn and 
family. 



business, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Beighle and 
daughter are moving to the Gaines 
apartment on North Main Street. 

Douglas Wood was the weekend 
guest of Joe Leadingham in Erlan- 
ger. 

e 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Cook had 
as Sunday guests, Mr. and Mrs. L. 
M. Clinkscales and family of Wil- 
liamstown and Miss Yvonne Flynn. 

Mrs. Tracy Hume visited Mrs. Geo. 
Fisher, Tuesday. 

Mrs. L. C Littrell of. near Verona 
visited her daughter and husband, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Armstrong, ofCov- 
ington, Friday. 

Rev. R. F. DeMoisey and Frank M. 
DeMoisey made a business trip to 
Virginia, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Pennington and 
daughter are 'leaving Walton, to re- 
side at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Holder are 
moving to Kenton County, on Tay- 
lor Mill Road. 



Page Seven 



Farm and Home Convention Speakers | B ^^° ve Homemakers 



Mr. and Mrs. Jim Stone are re- 
joicing over a great-grandson, David 
Trent, born to Mr. and Mrs. Eldon 
Pickett in Covington. 

-m MrS- J ames Woods and Mr s- Mat- 1 and Mrs. Russell Littrell 
mew Flynn were in Cincinnati on ' Verona, over the weekend. 



Those on the sick list are Julius 
Acra, FGeorgia Brooks, David Neu- 
meister and Dr. H. IF. Mann. We 
wish for them a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Andrew Perm was in Cincin- 
nati, Monday, shopping. 




The January meeting of the Beech- 
grove Homemakers club was held at 
the Latonia Gun Club, with the pres- 
ident, Mrs. Wm. P. Meyers, In charge 
of the business session* Members 
answered roll call by giving their 



points and stressing economy. Mrs. 
Powers and Mrs. Clinkenbeard gave 
the last lesson on Refinishing Fur- 
niture. 

Members attending were Mrs. 
Bryan Armstrong, Mrs. J. Brunck, 
Mrs. H. L. Olark, Mrs. Wm. Clinken- 
beard, Mrs. Wm.' Endres, Mrs. J. 



favorite radio program. Mrs. H.|Kunkle, Sr., Mrs. J. Kunkle, Jr., Mrs. 
Works and Mrs. Geo. Schadler were Louis Lee, Mrs. F. M. Powers, Mrs. 
co-hostesses. Mrs. Works gave the R. Robinson, Mrs. Gus Schadler, Mrs. 
lesson on Exterior Beautification. An Geo. Schadler, and a guest, Mrs. 
interesting' program, conducted by Edward Lowry.— Pub. Chm. 
Mrs. Joe Brunck, program chairman, i 1 . 



Bud Young and Harold Menke of 
Tampa, Fla., are here visiting fri- 
.ends and relatives- 
Mrs. Ada Adams, Mr. and Mrs. 



CELEBRATE GOLDEN WEDDING 

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Stephenson 
celebrated their golden wedding an- 
niversary Sunday at their home with 
a dinner for the following guests: 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Sexton and 
family and Mr. and Mrs. B. Stephen- 
son of Erlanger; Mr. and Mrs. Stan- 
ley Allen and family, Mrs. Edith 
Black, Mary Kathryn Black, Ann 
Dudgeon, Mrs. Emma Flynn, Alva 
and Faye Flynn, Mr. and Mrs. Lebus 
Stephenson and daughter, Mr. and 
Mrs. Owen Stephenson and daugh 



Gunpowder Homemakers 

''Hats must be suited to the indi- 
vidual in both shape and size," Mrs. 
Dolipha Sebree told the Gunpowder 
Homemakers' Club at the first meet- 
ing of the new year in the home of 
Mrs. Bert Marksberry, January 10. 

"The hat should speak the same 
language of the costume, harmon- 
izing in both texture and color," con- 
tinued Mrs. Edgar Utzinger, present 
ing her part of the lesson on hat 
making. The highlight of the meet 



was enjoyed by all, starting her pro- 
gram by reading the23rd Psalm. A 
poem written about the Licking 
River, was read by reading chair- 
benman, Mrs. F. M. Powers. 

Each member is to give something 
interesting about Kentucky at the 
next meeting. 

Mrs. Bryan Armstrong volunteered 
to go to Lexington to represent the 
club during Farm and Home Week 
Jan. 30 through Feb. 3. 

Miss elma Byerly, Home Demon-, 
stration Agent, talked on shopping, 
giving the club some very good 



For the Best In Heating 



-phone 



J arman Heating Service 



WALTON 



524 or 921 



Engineered Heating— Coed, Oil. 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



. ...v.i» n.i*<ui», Mi, ainx us, — -• ~"-- « <-".<- tmciiaun, ana jyir. ana 

Thomas Blaaker and daughter Shir- <M f s- Bernard Stephenson, all of Wal- 
ley Ann of Bowen, Ky., visited Mr. ton - The community joins in con 



. _ — rf •—«•» «"u uaugii- . - o- -..v .^gnHgm «i lae (ilea- 

•ter, Omer Stephenson, and Mr. and ln S was the introduction of the new 

nVT^C RornlK/1 Ct A «l ... «... . AT'lnni. Hl»"«^"ll I * .. 



of near 




gratulating Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
son and wishing them many more 
happy anniversaries. 



GRANT 

^ -li-iWMSrOwN.k'y •' 



MS 2020 



SATURDAY ONLY JAN. 

2 Laffterrific Hits 2 

hit no. 1 

'DON BARRY— in 

"SQUARE DANCE JUBILEE' 

hit no. 2 

Alexis Smith - Zachary Scott- 

"ONE LAST FLING" 



•in 



2 DAYS . . . STARTING SUNDAY 




— ■■ ■■■■ns«a w*. viiv new 

Nancy McClasky. Another note of 
Interest to be remembered was the 
changing of the meeting date from 
the second Tuesday to the first Tues- 
day, so as not to conflict with New 
Haven and to be able to hape the 
help of the Home Demonstration 
agent. 

Members present were Mesdames 
Virgvl Kelly, Dolpha Sebree. Meb 
Shelton, Edgar Utzinger, Robt. Moore 
Cliff Norman, George Black, Glenn 
Stevens, B. M. Stevens, Bert Marks- 
berry, the hostess, and one visitor 
Mrs. Harold Presser, and several 



—Is Your Subscription Paid— 



TUE. <£ WED. : JAN. 31 - FEB. 1 

INGRID BERGMAN 

JOSEPH COHEN 

MICHAEL WILDING 



Under Cwricoh 



THUR. & FRL FEB. 2 - 3 

- —Hit No. 1— 

Yvonne OeCarlo - Scott Brady 

— in — 

'THE GAL WHO 

TOOK THE WEST" 

— 'Hit No.' 2— 

Robert Ygung - Shirley Temple 

— in — 
'ADVENTURE IN BALTIMORE* 



Missionary Speaks At 
Piner PTA Meeting 

The PLner PTA was most fortunate 
to have as a speaker at the January 
meeting, Miss Esther Kuhn, Mission- 
ary to Africa. Miss Kuhn, who was 
a teacher at Piner school in 1942-43, ( 
is on furlough after four years of children—Pub Chm 
work in Africa. Since Miss Kuhn 
was visiting Mr. and Mrs. William 
R. Brown, she consented to tell the 
PTA about her experiences on the 
Mission fields. She also showed a 
number of very interesting, attrac- 
tive picture slides. Thesepictures 
were made while Miss Kuhn was In 
Africa. 

The PTA wishes to express it's 
heartfelt thanks to Miss Kuhn for 
her f ine*talk. 

The February meeting of the Piner 
PTA will mark the end of the mem- 
bership drive for this year. The or- 
ganization gave $60 to the school to 
be used to purchase library books — 
some for eacfi of the six grades. 
Maps of Kentucky are to be bought 
by the PTA also, to beused in the 
school's geography classes.— Pub. 

The Lancaster Negro 4-H club In 
Garrard county has a membership 
of 65 boys and girls. 



I 



Stock-Reducing Sale 

—-—MERCHANDISE REDUCED - 

Ladies' Better Dresses — * 

$9.00 value, $6.95 . . . $6.95 valu<S, $4.50 
Ladies' Corduroy Skirts — 

$4.50 value, $2.98 . . . $3.50 value, $2.50 
House Dresses — 

$3.39 value, $2.69 . . . $2.98 value, $2.25 ... $1.50 j 

Children's Corduroy Suits — $4.29 value ,. $3.00 

Boys' Caps $1.59 value, 79c ... 79c value, 59c 

69c Yard Goods ...... 50c - 50c value . 39c 

Seersucker Housecoats ....... 69c value, 50c 

Colored Outing ...,..:.,.._... 3 yards for $1.00 

Assorted Sizes and Styles — 

Blouses, Shoes, Slips, Sweaters, Robes 
—NO EXCHANGE ON THESE PURCHASES— 

Town & Country Shop 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 




W 



Sebree's Grocery 

WALTON, KY. . PHONE 21 "* 

TALL CAN SOUP— Honey Grove— Tomato or Vegetable ___•_ ..... 2 for 29c 

Good Cup Coffee . 3-lb. bag $1.79 

GROUND BEEF ....... lb. 49c SMOKED CALLIES L lb. 35c 

Seasoning Bacon, sugar cured : ; ' . ■ lb. 15c 

RIB PORKCHOPS lb. 39c DRESSER FISH, Whitings ...... lb. 20c 

Old Fashioned Bologna, sliced . . lb. 39c 

APPLES— Golden Delicious bu. 79c APPLES-Roman Beauties . bu. $1.25 

HONEY GROVE SALAD DRESSING ... „ quart jar 43c " 

_ 2 for 23c 

Y 2 gallon 20c .* 



BULBSNATCHER GOT YOU 
DOWN ? 




STOCK UP ON RIGHT-SIZE LAMP BULBS FOR EVERY 
S0CKET-AND KEEP. A FEW SPARES ON HAND, TOO/ 




TALL CANNED MILK— White Villa 
WHITE BLEACH 



12-oz. CATSUP 1 

CANNED HOMINY 

CANNED SPAGHETTI 
PUMPKIN— No. 2»/ 2 can ■■' „. - 
16-oz. SYRUP— Light or Dark 
WHITE VILLA PORK & BEANS 
CANNED COOKED DRIED LIMAS 
CREAM STYLE CORN— White or Yellow 



Why be without light where you need it when lamp bulbs 
cost so little and electricity is so cheap? 

Get enough bright new bulbs to fill those empty sockets 
— plus an extra carton or two for "spares." And be sure 
to specify the larger sight-saving sizes that do so much" to 
protect the eyes of your family. 

■ft ■ * 

^ We'll gladly recommend the right-sized bulbs for every 
lamp and fixture in your home. See us about it today! 

- * 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

INCOMFORATtt) 

fyou* QtueHdUf. ZUctMc Company 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 26, 1950 



Howard- Ammon 

In an air of sweet solemnity two 
hearts were made to beat as one 
when Miss Shirley L. Howard, dau- 
ghter of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony How- 
ard of Florence, became the bride of 
w Mr. Richard L. Ammon, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Ammon, also of 
Florence.. The very impressive double 
ring ceremony was performed in the 
Elsmere Baptist Church, Tuesday, 
December 27, 1949 at 7:45 p. m. by 



the bridal party entered the church. 
Attending the bride were Miss Billy 
Jean Dahlenburg, maid of honor, 
and Misses Martha Ammon, cousin 
of the groqm, and Lois J. Howard, 
sister of the bride, as bridesmaids. 
The best man was Paul Ammon, 
eldest brother of the groom. Ushers 
were Robert Ammon, brother of the 
groom, and Freeman H. Giles, cousin 
of the bride. They are now residing 
in Florence. Out-of-town guests at 



Rev. W. H. Lodwiok. Prior to the the wedding were Mrs. John Beck, 
ceremony, Miss Beverly Markesbery, aunt of the bride, and an uncle, El- 
soprano, and cousin of the bride, roy Revore, and wife of Dayton, O. 
sang "Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life," We Join in wishing Mr. and Mrs. 
and "I LoveYou Truly," accompanied Ammon health, happiness and pros- 
toy Miss Helen White, who also play- perity as they embark upon the sea 
ed Lohengrin's Wedding^ March, as of matrimony. 



• 



Rev. William E. Burke 

(Former Roman Catholic Priest) 
- WILL SPEAK AT THE 

GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

PINER, KENTUCKY 



Sunday, Feb. 5th VI 

Rev. William E. Burke, Field Representative for 
Christ's Mission in the Eastern States, received his edu- 
cation at State Teachers' College Preparatory School, 
East Stroudsburg, Pa., the University of Scranton at 
Scranton, Pa., and St. Bonaventure's College and Semi- 
nary, Allegany, N.Y. 

Ordained to the priesthood in the Cathedral in Scran- 
ton, Pa., May 30, 1931, Mr. Burke served as a Roman 
Catholic priest in several parishes in that diocese for ten 
years. In October, 1941, "he became disillusioned with 
the teachings of Roman Catholicism and resigned. 

After four difficult years of readjustment and various 
occupations, Mr. Burke was converted to Evangelical 
Christianity and joined the staff of Christ's Mission. He 
has traveled since that time extensively, preaching in 
Churches, Missions and Tabernacles. His messages are 
praised for their illuminating illustrations and apt prac- 
tical applications drawn from his wealth of personal ex- 
periences in the Roman Catholic priesthood. 

Mr. Burke also offers counsel to those having problems 
concerning the Roman Catholic Church and urges them 
to contact him at Christ's Mission offices, 756 Seventh 
Avenue, New York, or following any of his speaking en- 
gagements. * 

A ! ^&^n&::^>Chn<,.^m> . R*. . ^rko -3»t* ox 
the Catholic Church on a high level, completely omitting 
any sensationalism. With the other converted priests at 
Christ's Mission, he desires only to strengthen the faith 
of Protestants and to help Roman Catholics into the light 
of the glorious Gospel of Jesus Christ. 



MASTER MIX 

COMPLETE 
CONCENTRATES 

AND 
STRAIGHT FEEDS 



Bring In 250 lbs. Corn and Mix with 100 lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig^Starter at a low cost of only $3.15 per 100 lbs.. 

Walton Feed Mill 

Incorporated 
WALTON, KY. PHONE 57 




30E KENNEDY'S 



GAY 90s CLUB 

DANCING THREE NIGHTS EACH WEEK . . . 

Friday, Saturday and Sunday! 

x ■ Music By 

Lee Rolph & His Kentucky Play Boys 

Square and Popular Dancing 



'Gayest Spot On U. S. 25" 



» REFRESHMENTS! 

4 Miles South of Walton Phone Ind. 6495 



Average net income of Adair co- 
unty calves fed by 4-H club mem- 
bers was $93.43. 



•*V- 




4- Year-Old Boy Reminds 
Mother About Hadacol 






years old but he knows his B vita 
mins and minerals and knows 
that he, his mother and his grand- 
father get these valuable dietary 
supplements through HADACOL. 
"Mamma, we haven't taken our 
HADACOL," says Leslie when 
his mother has forgotten. Mrs. 
Ladd, who lives at 34 Cleveland 
Avenue, Nashville, Term., ex- 
plained that her folk will°always 
be a HADACOL family, not pnly 
because of little Leslie's remind- 
er, but because of the wonders 
that HADACOL has done in re- 
lieving her of gastric disturb- 
ances; creating an appetite and 
bringing back color to little Les- 
lie's palid cheeeks and in helping 
her father overcome the rheu- 
matic pains of neuritis. 




Mrs. Ladd and Leslie, Jr. 

M I have taken 10 bottles of 
HADACOL," said Mrs. Ladd. "I 
have been run down since my 
oldest son was born. I am 23 years 
Old. I have had very little appe- 
tite and had weak spells every 
morning I would almost faint, 
and, thanks to HADACOL, they 
are gone for good and I stay hun- 
gry all the time. 

"My four year old son had little 
appetite and his cheeks were 
pale. He now takes HADACOL 
and when I forget it he says, 
'Mama we haven't taken our 
HADACOL* His cheeks are rosy 
and he has a wonderful ap- 
atite. I also had headaches and 



gastric disturbances. They are 
now gone. My father now takes 
HADACOL for rheumatic pains 
of neuritis. He is much better 
now." 

There are countless thousands 
of HADACOL families in the 
country where all or most of the 
members of the family take 
HADACOL to get well and then 
more HADACOL to help stay 
well 

The folks in the Ladd family 
were suffering from a deficiency 
of B vitamins and certain min- 
erals, which HADACOL contains. 

A lack of only a small amount 
of the B Vitamins and certain 
Minerals will cause digestive dis- 
turbances . . . Your food will not 
agree with you . . . You will 
have an upset stomach . . . You 
will suffer from heartburns, gas 
pains, and your food will sour on 
your stomach, and you will not 
be able to eat the things you like 
for fear of being in misery, after- 
wards. Many people also suffer 
from constipation. And while 
these symptoms may be the re- 
sults of other causes, they are 
surely and certainly the symp- 
toms and signs of the lack of the 
B Vitamins and Minerals which 
HADACOL contains. And if you 
suffer from such a disorder, there 
is no known cure except the ad- 
ministration of the Vitamins and 
the Minerals which your system 
lacks. 

HADACOL contains not only 
one, but (Lof the B Vitamins. 
HADACOL contains not only one, 
but 4 of the necessary Minerals. 
■It comes to you in liquid form, 
easily assimilated in the blood 
stream so that it can go to work 
right away. 

It is easy to understand, there-, 
fore, why countless thousands 
have already been benefited by 
this amazing tonic, HADACOL. 

So, it matters not who you are 
... it matters not where you live 
... or if you have tried all the 
medicines under the sun, give 
this wonderful preparation a 
trial. Don't go on suffering! Don't 
continue to lead a miserable life. 
Many persons who have suffered 
and waited for 10 to 20 years or 
even longer, are able now to live 
happy, comfortable lives again 
because HADACOL supplied the 
Vitamins and Minerals which 
their systems needed. Be fair to 
yourself. Give HADACOL a trial. 
Demand the genuine HADACOL. 
Accept no substitutes. 



Washington county homemakers 
have ordered leather and other sup- 
plies for making 145 pairs of hand- 
made gloves. 

Talmage Huff of Harlan county 
estimated he saved about $200 by 
planting native shrubs when he 
landscaped his new home. 

New tobacco barns, approximately 
38x64 feet, have been built by J. E. 
Hammonds and W. R. Sparks of 
Laurel county. 

P. M. Basham of Breckinridge co- 
unty has completed a farm tool shed 
28x100 feet in size without posts in 
the center. 



FARMS 

19 ACRES — 4-room house, now barn, 
on concrete road, Fiskburg, Ky. 

56 ACRES — 6-room house, barn, near 
Morning View. Ky- 

83 ACRES— 4-room house? barn, sell- 
ing to settle estate. 

— Others to Show — 

• Harry F. Johnson 

Real Estate & Auctioneer 
PHONE IND. 6196 



IVgfSSU. 







WHEN 




HEBVOUS TENSION 



Tftrna ono s t l o n iif ntf ft ta e lw — 

rioa 1mm you awalra ■■» 



you mow wajnful the haste you toy 



Thoaa day* wImo 
mak» you britabW and Jumpy 



you cMmUer and more 
joa try to fight tha fcaUngt 

' JuTUaTWein* can help you on days' 
and nights like thaaa. It 
has been making good 
tar soon than 60 yaaia. 
CAUTION — uaa only 
as directed. Oat Mtlea 
Nervine at your drag 
ttora. Efferveecant tab- 
late, 85o, 75o — Liquid, 
25o, $1. Milea Labora- 
tories, Ihe^ 
Elkhart, 
Indiana. 



Miles NERVINE 




Try Our 





START WtTH A ROYAL HOSTESS SINK 

Pimn jrottr mw or remodeled kitcb.cn around a center of opera- 
1 a migtin»»gn Tn* attracthw Kttt»I 



A 



a pj tam Sink, shown above, nwim lifetime convenience. 



.new thrill awa't* you in the time-saving, work-saving 

feature* of the Royal Hottest Sink. Designed to bring new 

convenience and beauty to your kitchen, it it made in white 

and a wide variety of colors ... in sizes and models to fit room 

' space requirement*, to fill every kitchen need. Before you 

choose, *ee the Royal Hostess and other quality sink* in the 

. complete American-Standard line. We tell all these product* 

for modernization on a popular time payment plan. Remodel 

your kitchen now — and pay out of income on term* to fit 

»your budget. Come in or phone today . . . atk about the 

heating and plumbing product* that bear the Mark of Merit. 

A. & M. SUPPLY CO 



106 East Fourth Street 



Covington, Ky. 



JUniper 3500 




Sat., Jan. 28 ipam 

Having decided to quit farming, I will offer for sale at my farm, 
known as the "Old Kennedy Homestead," on the MT. ZION and 
VERONA ROAD, 2V 2 MUesEast of MT. ZION, KY., my farm and 
personal property, to wit: 

FARM consisting of 65 acres, more or less; I good five-room 
house, 4 good porches, electric; 1 good tobacco and feed barn com- 
bined, electric; 2 smoke houses; 2 chicken houses; I good cellar; 
lying on a good hard road; school bus at door; close to church; tele- 
phone ; 1 -acre tobacco base. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— 1 living room suite; 1 lounge 
c hair ; 1 radio-phonograph combination; 1 good bed and sprin gs; 2, 
library tables; 2 china cabinets; 2 floor lamps; 1 lot of rugs and car- 
pets; 1 floor sweeper and all attachments; 1 dining room table ; double- 
cabinet; Crosley refrigerator; good cook stove; Warm Morning stove; 
1 high chair and bed for child; a lot of small items too numerous to 
mention. 

ANTIQUES— 1 chest of drawers; 1 dresses and bed, all over 140 
years old; 1 lot antique* dishes, vases, all kinds and shapes; 2 antique 
stand tables; 1 clock; 1 lot of pans and skillets; all cherry antique fur- 
niture — has to be seen to be appreciated. 

FARM TOOLS— 1 two-norse wagon; 1 mowing machine; 1 disk 
harrow; 2 turning plows; 1 lot of small tools; 2 sets harness. 

LIVESTOCK — 1 four'year-old maref 1 horse, 8 years old, single- 
liner; 1 cow, 5 years old, fresh in February; 25 nice White Rock hens, 
now laying. 

— -TERMS MADE KNOWN DAY OF SALE 



For Information . . . Call Williamstown 6141 or 5481 

JIM GAYHART, Owner 

W. 2. RIMER, Auctioneer 




I 




« 



Thursday, January 26, 1950 




WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



O 



Page Nine 



SHEEP KILLERS ARE 
CALLED "WILD DOGS" 

Seven "coyotes'* trapped in Wooji 
ford county the past year were iden 
tified by U. S. Department of Agri- 



Syrnpathy Is extended Jim Rob- 
erts and family In the death of his culture experts as crosses of Collie 

Wife Ida. And Clarman r\r»lis>n A^rre * n~A !■■■■■ 

Mr. and (Mrs. E. V. Collins are vis- 
iting their daughter in Covington. 

Mrs. Ollie Hudson has returned 
from Booth Hospital and is doing 
very nicely. 

News has just been received that 
Mrs. Edith Miller passed away. 
Sympathy is extended her family. 

/Mrs. Georgia Noel attended church 
Sunday in Latonia Christian Church 
and visited the shut-in In the after- 
noon. 

Ira Spencer has sold Ms new home 
in Warsaw to Dr. Brown. 

Mrs. Addle Webster spent the 
weekend with her son, Walter Noel, 
and family. 

Mrs. Maude Rowland is expected 
home February 1 for a visit. 

Men are back at work on the 
bridge after the high water. 



UTOPIA CLUBS TO MEET 

Utopia olubs of Kentucky have set 
aside Thursday, Feb. 2 for their an- 
nual conference at Lexington, held 
In connection with the Farm and 
Home Convention. 

An outstanding speaker will be 
Paul Slaton, trust officer of the Cit- 
izens Bank and Trust Company, of 
Lexington, who will discuss "A Will 
and Its Advantages." Speakers from 
the University will be Dr. John H. 
Bandurant, Harry M. Young, Jr., and 
Dr. Earl Kauffman. 



DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

613 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday. 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



and German police dogs, and were 
called "wild dogs." Packs of nine 
and 12 were seen in the county. 

C. M. Perkins reported four raids 
on his flock in one week, with a loss 
of 74 sheep worth $2,200. 

The $750,000 sheep industry of 
Woodford county is threatened by 
the dog menace, County Agent H. 
R. Forkner said. Flock owners fear 
to pu,t sheep on small grain or grass 
at considerable distance frof farm 
buildings. Thus (feed that should be 
used for sheep goes to waste and the 
cost of sheep- raising is increased. 



INDEPENDENCE R. 1 



SPARTA R. 2 



Sorry to hear of the death of Mrs. 
Edith Hemingway Miljer, who pass- 
ed away Saturday night while vis- 
iting in the home of her son, W. A. 
Miller, at Erlanger. She was the 
daughter of the late Nannie and 
Biven Hemingway, and the wife of 
Charles L. Miller. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Furnish, 
Avery Furnish and Miss Jean Carv- 
er^attended the barn dance at Ren- 
fro Valley, Saturday night. 

Mrs. Freda Henderson and dau- 
ghter Louise visited her mother, Mrs. 
Aggie Easton at Warsaw, Sunday. 

Mrs. Susie Barton is on the sick 
list. 

Elmer Vernon Henderson has been 
ill several days and unable to at- 
tend school. 

W. A. Miller called on H. N. Wright 
recently. 

Mrs. Kathleen Carver and Mr. and 
Mrs. Elfrie were shopping in Cov- 
ington, Saturday. y , 
. Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Eagton and 
children called on Mr. and Mrs. El- 
mer Henderson and family, Saturday 
night. 

More (Monroe county farmers pur- 
chased feeder stock cattle In 1949 
than at any time in the past 10 years. 

Considerable vetch winter-killed 
in Boyle county a year ago because 
unadapted common seed was sown 
instead of recommended hairy vetch 

Johnson county tobacco was of 
good quality last year, many farm, 
ers reporting an average sale price 
of more than 50 cents a pound. 



The relatives and friends of Mr. 
and Mrs. Winford Riley extend their 
sympathy in the loss of their little 
son, which occurred at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, last Monday evening. 

We are very sorry to learn Mrs. 
Lucille Webb is still a patient at 
Booth Hospital, and is not improv- 
ing as rapidly as her relatives and 
friends would like for her to. 

We are glad to report Haden Ware 
has returned home from St. Eliza- 
beth Hospital. We wish him a rapid 
recovery. . 

Mr. and Mrs. George Finnell, Jr., 
are spending several welts with his 
parents in New York. 

Mrs. Charles Losey spent one day 
this past week with her sister, Mrs. 
William Summey. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barnett and son 
Howard spent the weekend recently 
with Rev. Roy Martin, his wife and 
little son of Lexington. 

The Staffordsburg church and 
Sunday school are planning an oys- 
ter and pie social in the basement 
of the church on Saturday evening, 
Feb. 4th from 5:30 to 9 p. m. Tell all 
your friends and neighbors to come 
and enjoy an old time get-together. 
Everybody welcome! 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klette and Mrs. 
J. A. Keeney spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. (Morris Wharton of Dayton, 
Ohio, . 

' Remember regular church services 
at Staffordsburg, the fifth Sunday, 
•both morning and evening, with the 
regular pastor, Rev. Wheary, doing 
thepreaching. Also try to come out 
to prayer service Wednesday even- 
ing at 7:45. We need your presence. 



4-H'ers RECEIVE MANY 
COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships totaling $9,250 were 
awarded last fall to 42 poung men 
and women, now enrolled in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Home Eco- 
nomics, University of Kentucky. Al- 
though only three were limited to 
members of 4-H clulbs, 33 of the re- 
Iclpients were members of that or- 
ganization. Awards were made on 
ithe basis of scholarship, leadership 
'and need, and ranged from $75 to 
,$500 an individual. 

Donors of scholarships were Farm 
! Underwriters Association, $600; J. H. 
and Mary Gibbs Jones, $5000; the 
Kroger Foundation, $800; Mason Co- 
unty Farm Bureau, $150; Ralph E. 
Mills Foundation, $500, and Sears 
Roebuck 'Foundation, $2,200. 



SEE 



kV LJ Aa« 

NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



[ 



LITTLE SOUTH FORK 



Hamilton & Jones 



Invites You to Shop! 



Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" 
-LOWEST PRICES 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



THE NEW P E LAVAL STERLING SPEEDETTE 

faJM H IJHH B mm Especially Designed 

for the Man Who 

Milks Ten Cows 

or Less! 

The new De Laval Starting Speed- 
ette ia designed especially for the 
man milking 10 cows or less. Your 
pocketbook can afford it— and you 
can't afford to be without it! It will 
save up to 68 lull working days i 
year on a 10-cow herd, save you 
countless steps, do the milking In 
half the time and produce more and 
deanar milk for you. See It today! 




THEANSWEB 



four Toughest 



Plowing Requirements! 



Miss Shirley Sutton is ill with 
tonsilitis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lulius Sutton and 
Mr. and Mrs. Rea Scudder were 
shopping in Covington, Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rea Scudder and 
Sally Jane Baker were in Warsaw, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Congratulations to the newlyweds 
Mr. and Mrs. Boian Baker (nee Bet- 
tie Mae Johns). They were married 
Saturday afternoon. 

Floyd Baker and Thelma Rider 
called on his father, C. E. Baker, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Baker and 
children, Sunday evening 

CARD OF THANKS 

The family of Mrs. Lucy Sanning 
takes this medium of expressing 
our appreciation for the kindness 
and consolation extended us during 
her illness and our bereavement. 

Wewish to thank Rev; B. C. Garrett 
and Rev. R. F. DeMoisey, singers and 
pianist, the pallbearers and flower 
donors. We appreciate the efficient 
service extended by Chambers and 
Grubbs funeral home. 

Clifford Holbourn, 
lt-4* Wilford Rice. 

James Bickett of Meade county has 
completed a milking parlor and rest 
shed and plans on having a dairy 
herd of about 35 head of high pro 
ducing cows. 



SUGGESTS WAYS TO 
GROW BETTER CORN 

Corn acreage in Boyle county is 
reported by Farm Agent John Brown 
to 'have been reduced from 22,649 
in 1920 to 10,000 to 12,000. Land once 
in corn now grows pasture for live- 
stock. 

Brown has five suggestions on the 
growing of corn— Select the best land 
and land that will not wash; grow 
adapted Kentucky hybrids; plow, 
plant and cultivate on the contour 
to save moisture 'and prevent eros- 
ion; plant corn thick enough to get 
top yield- for the fertility of the soil, 
and reduce damage from cornborer 
by early planting and use of poison 
sprays. 



Cost of fattening Fayette coetnty 
4-H club calves in 1949 was 28 cents 
a pound, compared to 35 cents in '48. 

Seven years ago, there were less 
than 15 acres of vetch in Hart coun- 
ty; now there are approximately 
10,000 acres of vetch with grain or 
crimson clover. 

Boyd and Lawrence counties have 
organized a joint dairy herd im- 
provement association. 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 

Cincinnati Stock Tarda 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market m the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to us. Why 
not now? 

Reference: Ask the first 
man you meet 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



STURGEON 

Electrical Service 

—Wiring of All Kinds— 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 
—Phone 71 or 1396— 



There Is (ART) In ARTISTIC 

—FREE CALL & DELIVERY— 
16 South Main St. Phone 144 Walton, Ky. 

Fur Coats Cleaned & Glazed 

Altering Invisible Reweaving 

Relining Dyeing 

Leather and Suede Jackets Refinished Like New 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quality Work . . . Guaranteed 
— All Garments Insured — 



I. C. GAINES Prop. DAVE WORKMAN 



* I H IIfWf ,„V v.3*BI 






QUALITY FARM 
^ EQUIPMENT - 




For a plow with 
plenty of brute 
strength . . . high 
lift for easy turning 
and transporting . . . 
plus the extra clear. 
ance necessary for 
deep plowing in 
trashy conditions, 
you'll find a John 
Deere Truss-Frame 
Plow unsurpassed. 
Its many features 
make it a real leader 
in two-, three-, and 
four-bottom plow 
▼alue. See as for 
fall details . . . soon. 



JOHN DEERE TRUSS-FRAME PWI/I/S 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 



110 PIKE STREET 



COVINGTON, KY. 



W. R. McGUIRE 

MOVING 

AND EXPRESSING 

Local and Long Distance 

Packing, Crating and Shipping 

—18 YEARS EXPERIENCE— 

Office . . . Second Floor 

32 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. 

PHONE DIXIE 8145 




A 



Pontiac Trade-In Sale 



Examine These Bargains Before You Buy! 



CHEV. 
PONT. 



'46 Sedan; black; driven $| aah 
little; radio; heater 1UZ/D 

'47 2-Tone Grey: 17,000 $| QAff 
miles; radio; heater _____l*Ja/D 



f HFV ' 46 stat * on Wa S° n : 



fully equipped 

'49 Sedan; maroon; 
radio; heater; extras 

'39 Business Coupe; 
black; good car 



PLYM. 
DODG. 

FAnn '47 Super Deluxe Sedan; $| AAff 
rUlil/ red; fully equipped IU"D 



!1095 

!1795 
_ s 395 



PONT. 



'48 Hydramatic Sedan; 
grey; radio; heater __. 



1695 



PftMT ' 48 4:Door; 2" Tone; $ i CQC~ 

rUlTI. less than 13,000 miles 10*/D 



HUD'N 



'48 4 -Door; 
maroon finish 



FORD 



BUICK 



PftNT 41 4 " ,Door; 



maroon; clean 

'41 Sedan;- 

Special "8" 1' 



new paint i 



U495 

$ 1095 

$ 695 

$ 695 



Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 
-All are one-owner cars traded in on the NEW '50 PONTIACS. 



Terms to SuIt^TIp to 24 Months to Pay! 

» ■ 

Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 



TOBACCO GROWERS! Sell your tobacco at the Covington 

Independent Tobacco Whse. Co., Erlanger, Ky. 

Just South of Covington, DIXIE HIGHWAY, ROUTES 25 & 42; Out AWAY from RIVER FOG & SMOKE 

Good parking * Clean Rest rooms - Plenty unloading space. NO WAITING! SALES EVERY OTHER DAY! 

Sell with men who GROW tobacco, who KNOW tobacco and your problems! 

* TELEPHONE 

Boyd Elliott, General Manager DIxie 7413 Orie Hill, Auctioneer 

Ernest Dance, Floor Manage* .»,,*, *••■■'■ Earl Acra, Weigh Man 

J.W.CW.FialdMa, G^for^g^o be« er ^ ^ ^ ^ 




Page Ten 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 26, 1950 



WAN! AD 




Classified advertising rate is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash in advance. 

PLUMBING & HEATING— Repairs or 
new installations, furnace clean- 
ing and service on stokers, gas or 
oifr-furnaces. Tri-County Heating 
and Plumbing Co. Florence 593. 

tf-49 

FOR SALE — All year permanent 
pasture, Ky. 31 Fescue will grow 
in cold weather, where other grass 
sleeps. We have plenty of seed — 
Phone Williamstown 5311. C. C. 
Worthington, Sherman,'. Ky. 2t-3* 



FOR SALE or TRADE— Team horses 
and harness, for cattle or sheep. 
Ira W. Stephenson, Nicholson and 
Walton Highway. Phone I n d . 
'6742. 2t-4* 

WANTED— Hay tedder in good op- 
erating condition, also good No. 1 
or No. 2 corn and good heavy oats. 
Address Box 419, Route 5, Latonia 
Sta., Covington, Ky., or phone Ind. 
68,82, evenings. tf-3 

FOR SALE— Dining room suite, rea- 
sonable; riding cultivator, disc 
harrow and fodder. Ind. 6985. 

lt-4* 

RUSSELL'S REFRIGERATOR and 
APPLIANCE REPAIR — Freezers, 
refrigerators, milk coolers, motors, 
pumps, etc.; also limited number 
rebuilt refrigerators, guaranteed 
for whole year. Phone Ind. 7430. 

. 4t-2» 



FOR SALE— Used, Model LA John 
Deere tractor, plow, cultivator and 
mower; Allis-OhalmeT "C" tractor, 
plows and cultivator. Butler Bros., 
Nicholson. Phone Ind. 5053. tf-49 

FOR SALE— 1939 Chevrolet 4-door 

. excellent condition, 4 new tires, 

$395.00 for quick sale; will take 

trade-in. Phone Ind. 6737. 2t-4 

INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers It's 
members life insurance, auto and 
truck insurance (largest in Ken- 
tucky), fire and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington?- Ky. tf-2 



FOR SALE— 1931 model "A" Ford, 

A-l condition, $85.00. Phone Ind. 

. 6737. 2t-4 

LOST— Female fox hound, black and 
tan, white ring around neck, scar 
on right hind leg. Homer Farris. 
Phone Walton 781X. 2t-3* 



FOR RENT— Unfurnished apartment, 
two rooms and private bath, pri- 
vate entrance. 35 South Main St., 
Walton, Ky. lt-4* 

WANTED — Man and wife, man for 
general farm work, wife to work in 
house part time; good wages, good 
living conditions. Ivan Horton, 
Manager of Anderland Farm, 
Union, Ky. - 2t-3 

FOR SALE— Frying chickens, dress- 
ed or on foot. Call Mrs. Shepherd. 
Phone Walton 1813. lt-4 

WANTED — Good grade or registered 
Holstein cows, yearlings and heif- 
er calves; dehorned stock preferred 
and subject to rigid veterinary ex- 
amination and blood test. Address 
Box 419, Latonia Sta., Covington, 
Ky. Phone Ind. 6882 evenings, tf-3 

FOR RENT— 3-room house on Green 
Road-- W, E. Cchulker. Phone 
Ind. 6313. lt-4* 

i FOR SALE— Two work horses, 8 yrs. 
old. G. R. Epperly, Bullock Pen 
Road. Phone Ind. 6696. 4t-2* 



FOR SALE — Kenton county farm, 
close In, good dairy or tobacco 
land, in blue grass, house, barn. 
Owner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, 
Ky. 4t-l* 



COVINGTON 

Ef-Ko ARMY Store 

5th and MADISON 

FOR MORE THAN 

27 Years 

WE'VE ALWAYS SOLD 

Good 

Work 

Shoes 

We fit small feet large feet 
narrow feet wide feet I 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

STORE 

508 MADISON AVENUE 
COVINGTON 



v $ 



Hamilton & Jones . invites y ou to shop! 

-:- Walton, Ky. 



Phone 99 



GIGANTIC AFTER 
INVENTORY SALE 

PRICES SLASHED 



2.98 Ladies' House Dresses ..... $2.25 

Ladies' House Dresses ■■.„„■ $1.19 

Children's Dresses ~ 89c 

Girls' Dresses $1.25 

Ladies' Felt Hats . $1.00, $1.79, $2.29 

Ladies' Purses ... . 79c and $1.00 

Ladies' Change Purses 30c and 50c 

Remnants of Yard Goods 

Earrings 55c pr., 2 pr. $1.00 

Scatter Pins 55c 

Pearls, long strings $1.00' 

Cigarette Lighters (fancy) * $5.00 

Tie Holders .... $1.00 



2.98 Men's Pajamas (A only)TI7$1.79 

Girls' Skirts (wool) $1.00 

Ladies' Skirts (wool) ..... $1.00 

Lace Collars 50c 

Girls' White Cotton Blouses _— — .. 50e 

(sizes 5 to 1 2) 

Boys' Sport Shirts „„'_•_ 79c 

(short sleeves) 

Ladies' Housecoats L $1.39 

(small sizes - orig. 3.98) 



Boys' Polo Shirts 79c 

Anklets 15c 

Men's Colored Polo Shirts 79c 

Men's Mufflers (colors) $1.00 

Jackets $1.00 

Boys' Ties ...,. 39c and 49c 

Ear Muffs .... 10c 

Little Girls' Knitted Bonnets :... 15c 

Baby Bonnets ^.^ 59c 

Ladies' Houseslippers $1.00 

(assorted styles and sizes) 

Knitted Suits 79c 

Little Boys' Pajamas $1.25 

Boys' Caps (odds ) , -39c 

Men's Caps 39c 

Boys' Coveralls 79c 

Men's Work Pants $1.49, $1.59, $2.49 

Boys' Wool Pants $1.79 

Boys' Light Weight Overalls .... $1.65 

Boys' Ctoon Pants .. _.. $1.65 

Men's Neckties :: 79c 

1.98 Ladies' Uniforms $1.39 

Wool Flannel, 54" wide 98c yd. 

Ladies' Better Dresses $5.00, $6.50, up 



Broken Sizes Assorted Styles 

No Exchange On These Purchases 



FOR SALE— Hay, baled, alfalfa 1-2- 
3 cutting; soy bean hay and mix- 
ed hay. Ind. 6882, evenings, tf-3 



:ONRAD HARDWARE! 



We Have The Genuine 
^w Window Materials 

Hold in Heat- Keep out Cold 

Ch«»p«r than «!«»» — For Storm 
v Doors & Window*, Porch Enclosures 

J^FlexOGlass 
Glass-ONet 
Plastiglass 

Jilil&WYR-O-GLASS 
PSISiB ^ , ^SCREEH-GlASS 





*«!•««#< _ 



—$1.95— 



Jamesway Uni-Temp 
Electric Hovers 



Square Al'm Tub $179.95 
Square Pore. Tub $149.95 
Round Pore. Tub $142.95 

— Liberal Trade-In — 



Massey-Harris Tobacco 
Setters $195.00 

9x12 Manitex 

Rugs $4.95 

9x12 Gold Seal 

Rugs . $8.95 

12x12 Armstrong 

Rugs _ $15.95 

12x15 Armstrong 

Rugs $18.95 

Linoleum by yard 

50c and 89c 

Window Shades 65c 

Plastic Window 

Shades *...... $1.69 

Custom Made Venetian 
Blinds 50c sq. ft. 




NATURE'S KEENEST RIVALS 

Ths chotc* of belter Poultrymtn every- 
where — they're Air Conditioned. 
Chlcki or* Hardier and Feather better 
when brooded this modern, easy, ace- 
nomical way. 

New Air and Heat distribution principle 
prevents hot and cold spots — chick* 
make use of entire brooding area — no 
crowding or piling up. 

If you have electricity you will want to 
tee this new hover. 

We alto carry the complete lino of 
Jametway brooding and laying equip- 
ment. 

4'x4' $39.95 

4'x6' $47.00 



Largo or Small 



See Powers 



. ALL TYPES OF HOUSEHOLD 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKV 



-~'jm 



FARMS WANTED— Small or large; 
we have a large list of customers 
waiting. For quick, reliable realty 
service, call us. Sailee Real Estate 
Co., 108 Locust St., Erlanger, Ky. 
Phone Dixie 7119. tf-4 



ENROLL during January in Blue 
Cross Hospitalization through Boone 
County Farm .Bureau. Family 
rates $24.50 per year; most hospital 
expenses coyered. Get further in- 
formation, John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. 3t-2 



FOR SALE — 1946 Pontiac Station 
Wagon, perfect condition. Call 
Walton 542. Wilson Case. 4t-4 



FOR SALE — Purebred Black Pole 
bull, 1 year old; 100 bales Timothy 
hay; also 1937 Plymouth 4-door 
sedan. Russell Rector. Phone In- 
dependence 6148. • 2t-3* 



WANT TO BUY— Dead Stock; horses 
$2.50; cows $2.50; hogs 50c owt., 
according to size and condition. 
Phone Walton, day 178, night 772, 
or Butler 6901. Griffin Fertilizer 
Co. tf-1 

FOR SALE— 25 White Rock hens and 
15 pullets. A. W. Franz, Green 
Road. Phone Ind". 6747. lt-4* 



FOR SALE or TRADE— 3-horse disc 
turning plow. Several head Mas- 
cova ducks. Nick Webster, Morn- 
ing View. Phone Ind. 6359. 2t-3* 



SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if ordered 
now! For prices and information, 
call A. iR. Kwozalla, Erlanger, Ky., 
Route 4. Phone Florence 593. tf-49 



CHICKS and Hatching Eggs from 
high producing, pullorum -tested 
Reds. Breeders immunized against 
Newcastle. Chicks from such a 
flock can make money for you. 
Grant Maddox, Florence. Phone 
384. 6t-2 



FOR SALE— Slightly used U. S. Army 

surplus two and fouT buckle aTct- 

les, $1.98. Henry's Bootery, next 

. to Kroger Super Market, Erlanger, 

Ky. lt-4 



BABY CHICKS— Every Sunday, Mon- 
day and Thursday. Ohio U. S. ap- 
proved, pullorum controlled. Bar- 
red Rocks, White Rocks, large type 
White Leghorns, New Hampshires, 
Buff Orphdngtons, White Wyan- 
dottes, Rhode IslandReds; also sex- 
ed pullets and cockerels available 
In all breeds. Hatches every Sun- 
day, Monday and Thursday. Head- 
quarters for feed, poultry supplies 
and remedies. Drive to (this mod- 
ern hatchery and take some of 
these chicks home with you. Open 
all day Sunday. Mt. Healthy 
Hatcheries, Wiwton & McKelvey 
Roads, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. Phone 
JAckson 9354. lt-4 



FOR SALE — Kenmore table-top kero- 
sene stove, $15.00, if sold at once; 
also metal all-white Coolerator, 
holds 100 lbs. ice, in nice condi- 
tion, $10.00. Ott Sneflliriig, Walton, 
Ky., near Rich wood. 2t-4* 



FOR SALE— Baby beef, suitable for 
locker or deep freeze; will sell 
whole or toy quarters; also pigs. 
Ira Stephenson, Walton-Nicholson 
Road. Phone Ind. 6742. 4t-2* 



FOR SALE— Hay, first, second, third 
and fourth cutting alfalfa; also 
Lespedeza and timothy; good clean 
straw; all baled. J. E. Huff, 4 
miles South of Walton, 1% miles 
North of Crittenden, on Wes Side 
railroad. Phone Ind. 6499. 4t-4* 






Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued On Page 6) 



FOR SALE — 4 or 5 tons alfalfa hay, 
baled. G. H. Moore, South Wal- 
ton. Phone 516. 2t-3* 



FOR RENT— Three-room apartment, 
unfurnished, heat and water fur- 
nished. W. W. Ryle, 44 South Main 
St., Walton. Phone 26. tf-4 



usEn nuns 



s<wr^mms^«^m><^m^^m;mmw. 



1941 Pontiac 2-Door 
1 940 Mercury 5-pass. Cpe. 
1 939 Pontiac 4-Door 
1938 Chevrolet 4-Door 
1937 Chevrolet Coupe 
1 935 Plymouth Coupe 



USED TRUCKS 

1948 Chev. 161" 2-ton 

1946 G. M. C. 2-ton 

1 939 Chev. I '/i^on Dump 

1 939 White 2 1/2-ton Dump 

f 



-Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 



Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE INR^ 5004 



Also Cooking, 
Water Heating 
and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, KY. 






'» 









WALT 




— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY — BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 




.« t 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1950 



Volume 35 — Number 5 



February 15 is Last Day 
7 o Report Farm Practices 



Most Farmers Are 
Eligible for Aid 

Wednesday, February 15, is the 
last day for farmers to report con- 
servation practices carried out un- 
der provisions of the 1949 Agricul- 
tural Conservation Program in order 
to qualify for program payments, 
Geo. A. Eubanks, Chairman of the 
Kenton County PMA Committee, an- 
nounced this week. ^ 

Reports, along with seed tags, re- 
ceipts for conservation materials, 
and other evidence are to be sub- 
mitted toy farmers to the county PMA 
office. The 1949 ACP closed with 
the calendar year on December 31. 
' All farmers participating In the 
program, except those who used their 
entire allowance for conservation 
materials, are eligible for cash con- 
tributions to* the cost of practices 
adopted. 

Farmers who received soil-build- 
ing materials, such as lime, phos- 
phate and cover crop seeds, in place 
of payments, should report to the 
county PMA office on the use made 
of these materials. Reports on the 
use of these materials are required 
whether a payment is due the farm- 
er or not. 

Successful Restaurateur 

The following story came to us 
from St. Augustine, Fla., and con- 
cerns Mr. and Mrs. Amos Penning- 
ton, who - z ~JM*K restau^iyrt is ^ 
JfjBijda city. Mr. Pennington is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Levi Pennington 
of Walton. 
"Amos and Mrs. Pennington 

'To be a consistent and persistent 
booster of the home community, very 
often takes courage and plenty of 
optimism. It is because of their un- 
failing faith, in the future of St. 
Augustine and their unflagging ef- 
forts to promote its development that 
Mr. and Mrs. Amos Pennington are 
now selected for this brief tribute. 

'They have proved very ably that 
they are restaurant operators of un- 
usual ability, for it as largely due 
to their ideals of service, coupled 
with the determination to serve on- 
ly the very toest of food that the 
Pennington's Chicken N Basket holds 
its high position in the public's 
favor. 

'They are people of sound business 
judgment, whose ideas have been 
the inspiration of many who know 
them. Their personality and energy 
in directing the operations of their 
restaurant are important factors in 
their well earned success. • 

'We are glad to pay this deserved 
tribute to the Penningtons and to 
point out to our readers that theirs 
is the guiding influence behind the 
splendid service and delicious foods 
to be found at the Pennington's 
Chicken N Basket in St. Augustine." 



CAN YOU HELP? 

The Boone County Chapter Amer- 
ican Red Cross has been requested 
to try to locate a hospital bed for a 
12-year-old child, who has rheumatic 
fever. These folks would like to 
borrow a bed and will take good care 
of it. Rheumatic fever is not con- 
tageous. ' 

Also, there is need for three used 
mattresses for double beds. The fam- 
ily concerned have eight children 
and their need is great. Both these 
families are deserving of aid. 

If you can help, call Florence 84, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Nestor, Boone Coun- 
ty Red Cross, and arrangements will 
be made to call for these things. 

Phebean Class Meets 

The Phebean class of the Kenton 
Baptist Church met in the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Al Sharp. The meeting 
was called to order by the president, 
Gean Smith. After singing several 
hymns, scripture reading was given 
by Lavern Collins; prayer by Mrs. 
Arthur Steeley. After a short busin- 
ess session, delicious refreshments 
were served. We played games'. An 
enjoyable evening was had by all. 

Those present were Jack Northcutt, 
Allan Casey, Gean Smith, Paul 
Sharp, Miss Lula Sharp, Miss La- 
vern Collier Miss Geneva Coins, 
Mrs. Arthur Steeley; a visitor, Miss 
Joyce Hammons, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Al Sharp and daughter Geneva. 



Methodist WSCS Meets 

Mrs. Sallie R. Miller was given a 
delightful birthday surprise in the 
form of a handkerchiew shower at 
the regular meeting of Circle I of 
the Women's Society of Christian 
Service of the Walton Methodist 
Church, on Thursday of last week, in 
her home. The meeting was con- 
ducted by the president, Mrs. J. R. 
Conrad, with Mrs. W. O. Rouse as 
leader of the program which was in 
keeping with the beginning of a 
new year. There were ten mem- 
bers present to enjoy Mrs. Miller's 
surprise: 

Mrs". J. R. Conrad. Mrs. J. C. Bed- 
inger, Mrs. Sallie G. Hughes, Mrs. 
G. W. Hoffman, Mrs. William Lan- 
caster, Mrs. Lula J. Hudson, Mrs. W. 
O. Rouse, Mrs. May me Sim§son, 
Mrs. Lotta Powers and the hostess, 
Mrs. Miller, and also Rev. G. W. 
Hoffman and Miss Emma Jane Mil- 
ler. 



Kenton County 
Garden Club Meets 
In Butler Home 



Cats Lose to Owingsville 57-58 There; 
lake Warsaw Easily 67-40 Tuesday 



Gunpowder Homemakers 

-i gjhg Gunpowder Hnmemakers willir 
nb'rarth.eL -3^ar ..^^,, r ^, ■J^Ht^mn 
home of Mrs. M. B. Shelton, Tuesday, 
February 7th at 10:30. 

The lesson on "Hat Making," will 
be completed, with Mrs. DoLpha Se- 
bree and Mrs. Virgil Kelly as lead- 
ers. '■ Each person attending is ask- 
ed to bring a home-made valentine. 
—Pub. Chm. 



Call Meeting Of 
Wa-Na Club Held 
Monday Evening 



DeMolay Skating Party, 

The Walton DeMolays are spon- 
soring a skating party at the Walton 
Rollerdrome on Thursday, February 
2nd at 7:30 p. m. 

ON KENTUCKY FARMS 

Four hundred and thirty farms in 
the northern part of Caldwell coun- 
ty have Ibeen connected with electric 
power lines since August. 

Harve MoBrayer of Rowan county 
has bought an electric refrigerator 
and deep freezer'for use in his farm 
home. 

The Waverly Homemakers Club in 

• Union county reported that all of it$ 

33 members had mail boxes with 

names, and mounted on good posts. 

Spring Hill Homemakers Club was 
the first one in Hickman county to 
Hreport every member's mail box 
painted and stencilled. 

Herman Sears of Knox county re- 
ported getting 65 percent egg pro- 
duction (from his floek of 100 New 
Hampshires. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Strove and sons 
were the Sunday guests of Mrs. 
Struve's parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. R. 
Chapman. 

Mrs. Vevde Webster is spending a 
week or two with Mrs. Blaine Dan- 
iels of Latonia. 

?Mr. and Mrs. Hess Vest and Mrs. 
Etta Macmanama spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Jones and 
family. 



The history of the Penny Art Fund 
was presented through an interest- 
ing skit at a call meeting of the 
Wa-Na 'Woman's Club, on Monday, 
January 30th. The history of the 
project was traced from the original 
idea of Mrs. Alvoni Allen, a New 
Jersey club woman to its adoption 
toy the General Federation of Wo- 
men's Clubs in 1930. The fund made 
possible toy the contribution of one 
penny from each club member is 
used to foster work by American 
artists. 

At the business session the club 
voted tojsend contributions to the 
Student Loan Fund and the General 
Headquarters Fund. 

M^.l«o..Flynn, Mrs. Jack Snape 
and Mrs. James Spencer were ap- 
pointed by the president to present 
nominations for new officers at the 
March meeting. 

Instead of the regular February 
meeting the club will attend a per- 
formance of the fee Capades at the 
Cincinnati Gardens, February 20. 

Mrs. Clayton Jones, hostess, serv- 
ed an appetizing salad course to the 
following: Mrs. Clifford Pruett, 
Mrs. Jack Snape, Mrs. J. B. Johnson, 
Mrs. Albert Hunt, Mrs. Oscar Cook, 
Miss Helen Smith, Miss Lillian 
Davis, Mrs. George Houston, Mrs. 
Charles Hayes. 

Assistant General Manager 

Jack Davih, radio announcer and 
producer who wrote a weekly col- 
umn for the Advertiser a few years 
ago, and whose father, A. M. Davis, 
lives on Verona, Route 1, has been 
appointed assistant general manager 
of a radio station, according to word 
received from Moline, 111. 

Mr. Davis has been program direc- 
tor and director of public relations at 
WQUA in Moline since January, 
1948. Prior to that time has was in 
the advertising business in Denver. 

Mn Davis' two sons, Paul Douglas 
and Christian Gerald, live with their 
grandparents on Sunny Acres farm 
near Verona. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. King of Latonia 
were the Sunday evening guests of 
Mrs. King's sister and family, Mr. 
and Mrs. O. J. Struve. 



Mrs. John L. Butler was hostess 
for the January meeting of the Ken- 
ton County Garden and Cultural 
Club at the Independence Christian 
Church. 

The meeting was called to order 
by the president, Mrs. William R. 
Brown. Mrs. Robert Crutcher gave 
a report on the purchase of gifts and 
food for a needy family and plans 
were made to give further assist- 
ance. 

In connection with her most in- 
structive talk on "Unique Dry Ar- 
ie"~ ' JHBijs, Orie-^g Waiv >• 
eral attractive -txmtms. 

Mrs. J. A. Keeney, chairman of the 
cultural committee, announced that 
Mrs. George Barbour of Cincinnati, 
will be guest speaker at the regular 
meeting to toe held February 23rd at 
the home of Mrs. Orie S. Ware. 

There were nineteen members in 
attendance. Miss Alma Stephens 
and Mrs. Leslie Frazier were wel 
come guests. 



Farm Bureau Office Now 
Open Mon., Wed., Fri. 

Monday, Wednesday and Friday __ 
The new Farm Bureau Office, in 
Burlington, is now open for business 
on Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
of each week, and at other times by 
appointment. They are now in a 
position to serve your needs on all 
insurance matters. 

John E. Crigler, local insurance 
agent for the Kentucky Farm Bureau 
and Southern Farm Bureau Life In- 
surance Co., announced that the two 
companies, are holding their South- 
ern Farm Bureau Sales Conference 
at Memphis, Tenn., February 27-28. 
He further stated that the trip with; 
all expenses paid will toe awarded to 
all agents who can qualify toy sell- 
ing the required amount of insur- 
ance by February 20. John says he 
is well on his way toward meeting 
the requirements for the trip. 

Golden Wedding Anniversary 

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Stephenson 
celebrated their golden wedding an- 
niversary at their home with a din- 
ner for the following guests: Mr. and 
Mrs. L. B. Stephenson and sons Ron- 
ald, Donald, Eldon and Roger, of 
Erlanger; Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 
Stephenson, Mr. and Mrs. Lebus 
Stephenson and daughter Sherry, 
Mr. and Mrs. Owen Stephenson and 
daughter Marilyn, Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Stephenson of Verona, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clarence Sexton, son Clifford and 

Emma Flynn, Misses Alva Marie ana 
Faye Plyrfh, Mrs. Ann Dudgeon, Mrs. 
Edith Black and daughter Mary 
Kathryn and Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Allen and sons, Jimmie, Donnie and 
Ronnie. The community joins in 
congratulating Mr. and Mrs. Step- 
henson and wishing them many 
more happy anniversaries. 



"Variety Quiz" at Hamilton 

The P. T. A. of the Hamilton school 
is sponsoring a "Variety Quiz,** to 
be given Thursday, February 16th 
in the school building. Reuben 
Kirtley is to act as Master of Cere- 
monies, with lots of prizes being of- 
feredy 



Play St. Henry, Friday; 
Warsaw, Tuesday 



The Walton-Verona Bearcats play- 
ed two' basketball games the past 
Participants will be selected week — one away at one at home. 
from number on the back of their They lost the away game. and won 
chairs. Admission prices are to be the home stand. 
15 and 30 cents. According to re- Last Friday night theCats went to 
ports, a special added attraction is Owingsville, Ky., where they met a 
being planned for, and more details strong five — a team that has lost 



will toe given next week. 



Dr. Mann Improving 

Dr. H. F. Mann of Walton Is report 
ed improving this week and he wish 
es to express thanks to those who feat waS no disgrace. Owingsville 
gave or offered blood, and also the led throughout, being in front 13-9 
hundreds of well-wishers who sent at the first Quarter; 25-24 at the half 



only to Clark County, Paris and 

Maysville, this season, and the locals 

dropped a one-point decision. How- % 

ever, the Blue and White played a 

top-notch game of ball and the de- 



cards and letters. 



Kenton County 
Homemakers At 
Farm-Home Week 



and 40-39 at the third period, 
final score was 58-57. 



Walton (57) FG 
Rice l 

Johnson ___ 

Cleek l 

Maddox 3 

Cheeseman 1 1 

Meadows 3 

Vest 12 

Totals, 21 



The 



Y 



Delegates from the Kenton County 0wi iUe < (5g) FG 

Homemakers Association who are jur ase ^ 

attending the Farm and Home Con- jjarHinJ 4 

venti6n being held at the University Tv . naV ,.f„ % 
of Kentucky, Jan. 31-Feb. 3, met 1 



Staffordsburg Homemakers 

The January meeting of the Staf 
fordsburg Homemakers' Club was 
held in the home of Mrs. Denver 
Binder. 

Mrs. Chester Hill presided. Sixteen 
>memibers responded to roll call. 
Lesson for the month: "Natural Fin- 
ishes." Mrs. William Gadker gave a 
brief report on the recent meeting of 
delegates, who will attend the Farm 
and Home Convention, ivirs. Bluch 
Rich gave the poem, "Be the Best of 
Whatever You Are," by Edgar Guest. 
A review of the "Bill of Rights," was 
■presented by Mrs. John Beall, Citi- 
zenship chairman. Miss Zelma E. 
Byerly, Home Demonstration Agent, 
gavesuggestions and helpful hints 
for future work in the club. 

The February meeting will be in 
the home of Mrs. William Binder. 



Lebanon Aid to Meet 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the 
Lebanon Presbyterian Church will 
meet on Thursday, February 9th in 
the home of Mrs. James Smith, on 
the Walton-Verona Road. 







































m 


:i 


■i lY- ; | 












'. '• JK". ' .2 






IBB 



Gardner's Circular 
Is New Guide In 
Gardening 



A towering yodel is unloosed 
by Kenny Roberts as. he strums 
a few notes before appearing on 
the "Midwestern Roundup" pro- 
gram over WLVV from 4:45 to 8 
a.m., EST, each weekday. 



A complete guide to gardening is 
Circular 376, 'Your Vegetable Garden 
Month by Month," published by the 
College of Agriculture and Home 
Economics, University of Kentucky. 

Written by John S. Gardner, author 
of a weekly series on gardening in 
Kentucky for the past 25 years, the 
circular deals with every operation 
in the production of a successful 
garden. There is a wealth of infor- 
mation about soils, how to handle 
them, what and when to plant, cul- 
tivation, fighting insects and dis- 
eases, and finally just "what can be 
done in the garden each month. 

For instance: "Gardens left bare 
last fail should be plowe*before the 
end of January is possible, with a 
heavy coat of manure turned under. 
Freezing and thawing after winter 
breaking will loosen the soil, and 
the manure will have time to rot. 
The toroken soil surface also will 
absorb more of the late winter rains 
and snows, the moisture on which 
the vegetables may have to depend 
later in the year. For this season, 
the deeper the plowing the better." 

Copies of Circular 376 can be had 
at offices of county farm and home 
agents or by writing to the college 
at Lexington. 

Independence WMS Meets 

The W. M. S. of the Independence 
Baptist Church met at the home of 
Mrs. Charles Dorsey for the first 
meeting of the new year; The theme 
of the program for the year is "Ad- 
vancing With Christ, Now." The 
program was directed by Mrs. Dor- 
sey. Officers for the new 'War are : 
Mrs. Thomas Cain, presidenX; Mrs - 
George Riley, vice president; Mrs. 
Alfred B'Hymer, secretary; Mrs. D. 
Dickson, treasurer; Mrs. Frank Cox, 
Mission study chairman; Mrs. C. E. 
McGraw, community Mission chair- 
man, and Mrs. W. E. Maners, Sun- 
beam leader. 

Other members who attended the 
meeting were Mrs.*" Leslie Wagner, 
Mrs. W. Shropshire, Mrs. Clifton 
Wright and Mrs. R. E. Colclough. 

The next meeting will be at the 
home of Mrs. B'Hymer on February 
16th at 10:30 a. m. 



last Wednesday at the Federal Bldg., 
Covington, with Miss Zelma E. By- 
erly, Home Agent, to complete. ar- 
rar:. .Stf&ggsatt, Jht A«&f 
ing. 

Mrs. Frank Ringenbach, county 
president, and Mrs. Bluch Rich were 
elected voting delegates. They will 
attend the business meeting of. the 
Kentucky Federation of Homemak- 
ers Wednesday evening. Mrs. R. P. 
Matchett, vice president of the Ken- 
tucky Federation of Homemakers, 



Swartz lO 

Davis 

Lyons 5 



FT 


PF 


TP 





2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 





3 


1 


5 


7 


2 


1 


4 


2 





8 


7 


3 


?1 


15 


12 


57 


FT 


PF 


TP 


1 





6 


2 


4 


10 





2 


4 


8 


4 


28 





3 








3 


10 


tfu~- 


13 


X 



f uesday evening the locals enter- 
tained the Wildcats from Gallatin 
County High at Warsaw. The Bear- 
cats took the lead on the first play 
of the game and were never headed. 
They led 17-7 at the end of the first 
quarter; 32-14 at the half; 49-20 at 
the third period, Snd 67-40 as the 
contest ended. 



will attend the State Advisory Board W ', f/ ._ /c »» 
meeting Monday and will make ajgj"" * b,) F ° 

report on membership activities ofj iR ;"_ ? 

the state organization at the busin- ! T r! J 

ess meeting of the Federation. Dis- 1 cieek • — " 1 

cussions of health, charm and good L*. H Hrt " 1 

looks will have a place in the ^ffiSdowi 

gram scheduled. ^ ** 

Speakers on the program include 
Dr. Regina Wescott, consultant in 
family and community development, 
Milyaukee, Wis. She will have as 
her subiects, "Let's Start WithJDur- 
selves," and "Arousing the Commun- 
ity to Action." 

Mrs. Raymond Sayre, Iowa farm 
woman and president of the Associ- 
ated Country Women of the World, 
who recently returned from Ger- 
many, will speak on, "Is There A 
Chance for Germany?" At the home- 
makers luncheon Friday, her sub- 
ject will toe, "Links of Friendship." 

Miss Mary Stuyvesant, New York 
beauty^advisor, who has as her slo- 
gan, "Look Your Best to Do Your 
Best," w4[l make to appearances on 
the . program. She will speak on, 
"Every Woman Can Be Beautiful," 
and again on "Fashion and You." 

Official delegates from Kenton-co. 
are: Mrs. R. P. Matchett, Mrs. F. P. 
Ringenbach and Mrs. Bluch Rich. 
Other delegates are Mrs. Roy Sand- 
man, Mrs. Philip Klein, Mrs. Gar- 
field Cooke, Jr., Mrs. Charles Held, 
Mrs. Joseph Kunkel, Mrs. Bryan 
Armstrong, Mrs. R. W. Elliott, Mrs. 
F. D. Wallace, Mrs. Wm. Gadger, 
Mrs. A. L. Lahner, Mrs. C. A. Finer, 
Mrs. Albert Hartman, and Miss Zel- 
ma E. Byerly, Home Agent. 



Cheeseman 1 

Vest ! 8 

Glacken 

Totals 24- 

Warsaw (40) FG 
Rider 

Webster 2 

Maxwell 2 

Beach 1 

Puckett 3 

Ashcraft 

Montgomery 2 

Riddle 2 

Totals 12 



FT 
3 
2 
2 
3 
5 


4 


4£ 

FT 


1 
1 
5 
3 

4 
2 
16 



PF TP 




1 9 




3 4 




4 6 




1 5 




4 17 




5 4 




5 2 




1 20 




- 




°<i RT 








*» 




PF TP 




1 




4 5 




3 5 




3 • 7 




4 9 




2 s 




4 8 




3 6 




24 40 





■v. 



Baptist WMS Meets 

The W. M. S. met at the Walton 
Baptist Church, Thursday, January 
19 for the regular meeting. The bus- 
iness session was conducted in the 
morning, the president, Mrs. Bryari 
Rector, presiding. 

The afternoon program was from 
Royal Service, led toy the program 
leader, Mrs. Vevia Webster. Several 
members took part. 

Twenty-three members were pres- 
ent. Clothing was brought in to be 
sent to the mountain people «f Ken- 
tucky. Members are asked to bring 
jelly or preserves to the church this 
Sunday to be sent to the Baptist 
Training school in Louisville. 

Dance at Legion Home 

A square and round dance will be 
given at 'the Walton American Leg- 
ion Hall on Friday, February 17th, 
sponsored by the Verona Commun- 
ity Club. A prize will toe given for 
the best set of square dancers. 



Gallatin County won the reserve- 
team game 36-30. 

At St Henry, Friday and 
•At Warsaw Next Tuesday 

The coming week will find the 
Bearcats away from home for two 
games. Friday night of this week 
they go to Erlanger to play the St. 
Henry Crusaders in their new gym, 
and on Tuesday of next week they 
go to Warsaw for a return match 
with the Gallatin County Wildcats. 



Attend Workshop 

On Wednesday, January 25th an 
important workshop was held at the 
Kenton County Red Cross headquar- 
ters for officers of the Red Cross. 
Campbell, Kenton and Boon£ coun- 
ties were represented at this meet- 
ing. Mrs. Elizabeth Nestor and Mr. 
and .Mrs. Dean Bloss represented 
Boone county. Speakers included 
Mrs. Nestor and Mr. Bloss. 

Various phases of Red Cross work 
were discussed. No set plans were 
adopted, as conditions vary in each 
county. However, suggestions of - 
feredj during the day will be used 
as needed. 

The annual Red Cross Fund Drive 
will open in March. AH counties are 
expecting to enlist large corps of 
workers to insure a successful drive. 

Mary Yealey Is Model 

Miss Mary Yealey of Walton, was 
the model used by Joseph Hornstoy, 
hiirdresses, in winning the Kentuc- 
ky contest in Louisville. He has al- 
so won the Ohio and Indiana con- 
tests, using Miss Yealey as his 
model. Quite an honor for Walton 
to have the lady with the most beau- 
tiful hairdo. Congratulations! 



Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



1 


WALTON 




ADVERTISER 


<. 


(Established in 1914) , 


Entered as Second Class Matter 




January 1, 1916 at the Post 




Office at Walton, Ky. ' 


9 

Mark M. Meadows 




Editor and Owner 




MALCOLM SIMPSON 




Assistant Editor 



| INDEPENDENCE 

George Rector is remodeling his 
residence. His grandson, Elwood 
Jaeger, is going to teach in the Er- 
langer school and "Will move into 
this remodeled apartment. 

dEgar F. Kipp, St., 65, died of a 
heart attack last week. He made his 
home with the Delfendahls. Mr. 
"Mr. .Delfendahl very recently passed 
away. The sympathy of the com 
munity goes to the family. 



? 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

$1.50 PER YEAR 
(In Advance) 



MEMBER 



KEjmJCKY PRES! 
/^A SSOCIATION , 



Frank Cox's aunt, Mrs. Ollie Cum- 
mins, passed away January 23 in 
Falmouth. 

Mrs. W. E. Sims, after an opera- 
tion in the Jewish Hospital last week 
is reported doing alright. 

The eleven -months-old baby of P. 
J. Matteoli was buried last Saturday. 

Malcolm Cox was buried Thursday 
of last week. The community ex- 
tends sympathy to these homes 
where death has come. 

Neal Beach, 8-year-old son of C. 
W. Beach, is back in school after a 
tonsil operation. 

Clifford Lipscomb is getting out a 



little after an attack of rheumatism. 
Thursday night, Feb. 16th, Rev. 
Maurice Aguillard, a man of great 
spiritual power, from Louisiana, will 
speak at the Independence Baptist 
Church. His work has been among 
his own people of the French section 
of Louisiana. His coming is in con- 
nection with a program of Mission- 
ary education. The public is invit- 
ed. 



A total of 436 4-H club boys and 
seven girls are carrying agricultural 
projects in Graves county. 



. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

6 1 3 Madison Ave. 

■j 

Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday, 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



Absolute Auction 

SAT., FEB. 11th - 1140 «. M. 

On Holbrook and Lawrenceville Road, l /z Mile from 

Taft Highway, Grant County, Kentucky 

On account of the health of Mr. and Mrs. Guy A. Piner, they 
have signed an Absolute Auction contract with Rel C. Wayman & 
Sons and Baxter Blair, licensed real estate and auction brokers, to 
sell at absolute auction, regardless of price or weather, their farm 
containing 93% acres. It has a good 5-room house with 2 porches 
and a pantry. Smoke house with a basement; good ehickenhouse , 
and other outbuildings; 2 good barns, with electric in every build- 
ing; 2-acre tobacco base for 1950; 7 acres alfalfa; everlasting watey 
pond, 3 springs, 1 sulphur spring that never runs dry, and 2 cis- 
' terns at the house. School bus, mail route and milk route. 

Some household furniture and some antiques; 2 radios, antique 
marble-top dre§ser 175 years old; antique side-saddle for woman. 

Livestock — Two No. 1 cows, one will be fresh soon; 1 heifer, 
6 months old; 1 extra good team of horses, and harness, and one 
unbroken filly 4 years old. 

Farming tools— All kinds of tools; mowing machine, hay rake, 
wagon with ,hay frame, good sled, new cutting harrow, plows of 
all kinds, forks and hoes, log chains, iron kettle, tobacco sticks, 
100 yards tobacco canvas; 1939 LaSalle sedan, in good condition. 

Entertainment by Frank Miller and the Kentucky Fiddlers 

FREE— A fat pig to the lucky ticket holder— FREE 

(At Opening of Sale) 

REL C. WAYMAN & SONS 

Competent Licensed Real Estate and Auction Brokers 
623 Washington Street Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 5107 - Ind. 5064 - Evenings JUniper 4895 
BAXTER BLAIR, Grant County Agent— Williamstown 7351 

"WANT ACTION? AUCTION IT!" 



WALTON HOMEMAKERS, II 

Mrs. <fcace "Corrall Alexander was 
(hostess to Walton Homemakers, II 
at her home on Fex Street, Elemere, 
January 18. The meeting was call- 
ed to order by the president, Mrs. 
Wm. Jones. Eight members were 
present, with three visitors. Miss 
McClasky met with the group. Mrs. 
Alice Flynn gave the lesson on "Hat 
Making," and took orders for hats. 
She was assisted in the lesson by 
Mrs. Leo Flynn. 

The next meeting will be at the 
home of Mrs. James RiddeW. 

All wished Mrs. Alexander a hap- 
pay vacation in Florida. — Pub. Chr. 

r 

Mrs. Jesse Mitchell of Warren co- 
uaty is completing the landscaping 
of her home, following suggestions 
from the College of Agriculture and 
Home Economics, University of Ken- 
tucky. 



Come in "'See How the 



Feed Saver 



NEW 

HAMMER 

MILL-- 



I Hits the 

Bull's Eye 
I With Both 
1 Barrels 



Friday, Feb. 3 



Beginning at 
12:00 Noon 



1 Mile West of Verona, Ky. 

On Porter Road— Turn Right in Verona and Turn Left at First Road 

Having decided to quit the dairy business, I will selLmy entire herd 
consisting of the following cows: 

1 large 5-year-old Guernsye cow, will be fresh by day of sale ; 1 half 
Guernsey and half Brown Swiss heifer, first calf by side ; 1 Jersey, 5 
years old, giving 5 gallons per day; 1 Brown Swiss heifer, giving 4 gal- 
lons per day; 1 Milking Shorthorn, 5 years old, calf by side; I" Jersey, 
6 years old, giving good flow of milk; Brown Swiss, 5 years old, will 
freshen first of March; 2 half Brown Swiss heifers, with calves by side; 
1 Jersey, 3 years old, giving 4 gallonsper day; 1 half Brown Swiss 
heifer, to freshen in February; 3 large yearling heifers, half Br. Swiss; 
1 registered Brown Swiss bull, Featherstone's Baron Rollo, 1 1 months 
old; these cows all sound, T. B. and Bang tested; also one 4-can Milk 
Cooler, good as new; seven 10-gallon Milk Cans; Milk Pails; Wjash 

Alfalfa 




GRINDS 
MOIRE f EED 

Per Horse Power 



HAMMER TIPS 

STAY HEW 

8 ru A* 



T.T.ELLIOTT 

J. L Case Sales. Parts & Service 
BRACHT STATION. KY. ' 
Phone Ind. 6545 



Thursday, February 2, 1950 



FARMS FOR SALE 

41 ACRES— £-room home, large solarium, 2 bathrooms, also 2 stajr- 
ways, modern kitchen, full basement, new furnace W^f^.fJ**" 
trie hot water heater; nice dairy barn, with drinking fountains, 
also feed room; milk house adjoining barn, used for calving barn, 
modern kitchen house; hog house; meat house; 2 large cisterns, 
lake stocked with fish, 2 creeks; 0.9 acre of tobacco base, all 
buildings are wired for electric and separate fuse boxes; this is 

• one of Kentucky's, rich bluegrass farms; K's hard to describe this 
farm and do it justice; ideally located on gtate Highway; bus 
service; close to town. * 

141% ACRES— 5-room house, modern dairy barn, milk house and 
all necessary outbuildings, lot of alfalfa; this farm will grow 
bluegrass; everlasting water. 

64 ACRES— Near Walton; 7-room houtfe, large combination barn 
equipped for dairy, new milk house, double garage, tenant house. 

146 ACRES— Close to Florence; 5-room house, barn equipped for 
dairy, milk house and plenty outbuildings; this farm can be 
farmed with tractor; has about 1 mile road frontage. 

80 ACRES— 12 miles from town;-5-room house, large barn, and 
outbuildings; most all tractor land; cheap. 

R. P. COLEMAN 

* REAL ESTATE & AUCTION SALES 



FLORENCE, KY. 



PHONE FLORENCE 148 or 347 



SPECIALS 

Home Freezers— 8 cu. ft. $220; 12 cu. ft. $300 
Television — Floor samples $85 and Up 

Also — Complete Youngstown Cabinets and Sinks; 
G. E. and Philco Refrigerators; Gas and Electric 
Ranges; G.E. Water Heaters; Fairbanks-Morse 
Water Pumps. Liberal Trade-In Allowance! 

EASY TERMS! 

R. W. Gross Appliances 



Phone Ind. 5111 



Independence, Ky. 



HENRV'S BOOTERY 

SHOES ... For the Entire Family . . . SHOES 

Next td Kroger Super Market - Erlanger, Ky. 

- — SHOP HERE & SAVE : 

RED GOOSE SHOES RUBBER FOOTWEAR 

MEN'S GOOpWORK SHOES 

—PHONE DIXIE 8034— 




524.95 

For Your Old Washer, Regardless of Make or Condition 
No Down Payment — 1 Year to Pay 



DIAMOND 
i VALUE . . . 



good 



Hay. 



W. L. Satchwill, Owner 

BRADFORD & WORTHINGTON, AUCTIONEERS 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and ! 
admiration. 

Come to Motch's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced In strict con- 
formity with value. "^.. I 



Our' 90 years' experi- 
ence in this one loca- 
tion is your assurance 
of getting dollar for 
dollar value, in your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 
Monthly Payments I 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON. KENTUCKY 



t 




Ofcourseyoucan 
afford a /wjtaq! 




-7i 



Now— a genuine Maytag at these easy-on-the-budget prices! 
Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
faction with the rugged, dependable Maytag! 

Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
onstration. 




THE MAYTAO CHIEFTAIN. A gen- 
uine Meytag, yet priced within • 
fewdollaraoftheloweet- t mg± « r 
ooat wmh.ri on the >| # A" 



THI MAYTAO COMMANDER 
Big, square porcelain tub. Gyra- 
foam action washea M - _ B _ 
extra fait, extra »|44_ 



HAGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 



/ 






~\ 



.« 



Thursday, February 2, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 




WALTQN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt. 

Sunday School iO:Qp a. m. 

Morning Worship ii:00 a. m 

B. T Ji. • 6:30 p m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Fred S. Nichols, Pastor 

Frank Penick, Supt. 

Sunday School iO:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship H:00 a. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 

Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School io.OO a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a m 

Youth Fellowship 6:45 p. m! 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. ._ 7:30 p. m. 

ST. PATRICK CHURCH, VERONA 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

•3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month, __ 10:00 a. m. 
5th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 
J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Worship Service 11:00 a. m 

Evening Service : 7:30 p.m 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m, 





Internal,.*™! Umlocm ■HT 
'-UiJJp I S""''*r School U» n._PIU 



,8y DR. KENNETH J. FOREMAN 



Page Three 



SCRIPTURE: AcU 11:18—13:3. 
DEVOTIONAL READING: Latah 42: 
9-9. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m 

(First and Third Sundays) 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



ALL SAINTS MISSION. WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. ___ 8:00 p. m. 
Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 

— Services Every Sunday— 

INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor __■_,__ 6:30 p. m. 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Don Smith, Pastor' 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Service '__ 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 



Where We Came In 



Lesson for February 5, 1950 




NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 

CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Walter Kidwell, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m, 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 

CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt-^Hafvey Hughes 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service _'__ 11:30 a. m. 

LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service » 3:00 p. m. 



BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Paster 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. iru. 

(Every .4th Sunday) 



. VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Services 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. TJ. 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. in. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Ray 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK 4 TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



♦ 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION , 




THRIFT wi I assure you of a safe 
journey to financial independence. 
Start a savings account here, and 
it will not only afford INSURED 
SAFETY for your savings, but your 
liberal earnings will provide a muck 
longer and more comfortable trip. 




FIRST FEDERAL loanassn. 

501-503 MAIN ST. -HE 6480 - COVINGTON, KY. 



K CIRCULAR LETTER came in 
** the other day from a stranger 
who is hot and bothered because he 
has discovered that Jews and 
Negroes can belong to Christian 
churches along with white Amer- 
icans. The astonishing thing is not 
that that should be 
true, but that any 
man should get ex- 
cited over it. What 
astonis hed the 
Apostle Paul w a s- 
not that Jews ^vere 
in the Christian 
church but that 
anybody else could 
be! We must recall 
that Jesus was a Dr - Foreman 
Jew; that all the apostles were 
Jews; that the first Christian 
church at Jerusalem was composed 
exclusively of Jews. 

• • * 

New Type 

•THE CHURCH AT ANTIOCH, one 
* of the great commercial cities 
of the Roman world, was where 
We Gentiles came in. The writer 
is indebted to his former teacher, 
Dr. Charles Erdman, for noting 
four ways in which that church 
in Antioch was something new. 

They had no Old Testament, 
they knew nothing of the Old 
Testament sacrifices, they had 
no interest in the Temple or in 
the history of Israel. Like most 
Gentiles, they had usually 
thought of the Jew as a quaint 
but unimportant minority 
group. Now that these Gentiles 
were in the same church with 
Jews, there would be plenty of 
„ room for trouble. 

Could a church made' up of such 
different races become a true 
Brotherhood? So the old mother- 
church at Jerusalem sent up 
Brother Barnabas to look around. 
Barnabas was not the church's 
most brilliant mind, but he had a 

heart full of faith. 

• * • 

New Leaders 

£«OD DOES NOT ALWAYS give 
^" the greatest" successes to the 
"big names." Nowadays every one 
who knows his Bible knows Paul 
and Barnabas; but in Antioch both 
men were unknown at first, and 
untried. 

When God wants a Reforma- 
* tion he calls forth a Luther, 
an obscure man who never 
fitted any of the existing priest- 
ly molds. When God wanted to 
open up Africa he called David 
Livingstone; when he wanted 
men for the far interior of Asia 
he called Hudson Taylor. When 
he wanted light to shine down 
into the slums he called William 
Booth. 

These were all peculiar men by 
the standards- of tfreir times, but it 
takes peculiar men to break away 
from tradition's hearth-fire and 

break out new roads for the Gospel. 

• *• • 

New Center 

pOR SOME TIME Jerusalem was 
* the capital of the Christian 
world. All roads led "out from there, 
so to speak. With the rise of the 
Antioch church, however, a new 
center took the place of the old. 
Jerusalem withered away. In later 
times Alexandria led, and then 
other cities. 

For a thousand years Rome 
and Constantinople were the ac- 
knowledged centers of the Chris- 
tian world. Now we have also 
London — New York — Geneva . . . 
Many such centers have small 
beginnings. In America's early 
days the churches of Scotland 
sent over missionary offerings 
for the help of the struggling 
little church of New York. 
In future years, who knows? Some 
church in Yunnan may be sending 
missionaries to the feeble folk left 
in the war - devastated ex - white 
world. 

• • • 

New Name 

K NTIOCH is no longer a city of 
** any importance. Missionaries 
go to it, not from it. But old Antioch 
left us something still cherished, 
a new name for believers: Chris- 
tian. That name itself proves 
something. 

It proves that the church in 
Antioch was something more 
than an aggregation 61 
"churchmen." It was a fam- 
ily of Christ-men and Christ 
women. These 'ItoUevers must • 
have taited -and lived some- 
thing better- than mere Vague 
"religion." They talked of 
Christ, they loved Christ and 
they lived Christ, till even 
their busy neighbors took no- 
tice. 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! | 



NEW BETHEL BAPTIST, VERONA 

Rev. R. F. DeMoisey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. * ' ' 

Sunday School JO:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship - 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

—Services Every Sunday— 

WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

G;rover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMillian, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morndng Worship 11:00 a.-m. 

B. T. U 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. m. 



Prices 
all can 
afford ! 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. S 7:00 p. m. 

Worship /___ 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-Bible Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 



STAFFORDSBURG CHURCH 

Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt! 

Morning Worship ;_■ 11:00 a.m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m. 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 
Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 10:30 a. m. 



the Facilities; 
the Experience, 
and the Ability 
to give the 
Finest in funeral 
service I 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

FUNERAL HOMES 

Walton, Ky. Florence, Ky. 

Phone 352 Phone 193 



THE BEST PLACE 
to 



EAT 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 




For A Rainy Day! 

Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as little as. $1.00! 

Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KY. 



DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00*. < Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 



«. 




NOT DEAD... BUT SLEEPING 



m- *f^W **; 















We know a man who says, "When you're 
dead, you're dead." Wonder what he would 
think of this picture ? 

This is a picture of things that seem dead. 

Barren trees, shrubs laden with mow, and a 

million blades of grass buried beneath the. 

Winter's mantle. 

But we know these things are not dead . , 
just sleeping. Waiting for another Spring . , 
waiting to blossom and flourish again. 

And it is that knowledge that enables us 
ho see beauty in a winter scene; how morbid' 
our picture if we didn't know that Spring 
would come again. 

The Christian belief in a life hereafter is 
vital to man's happiness and courage. It is 
one of the many truths our Churches teach 
which can enrich your life. 



/asjr£>^ 



THE CHOBCH FOB AIL . 
. Att POR THE CHUHch' 

Th. Church i. th. or.ot.,t tac . 

W,? h * ° f r * hoU " •' «PWtu<u valu.. 
Without a .trong Church, n.ith.r 

cMhW. .ok.. Oiror'th^a^ 
£J hi » c °°>munity and nation. (4) 

which *«2& t L* Church '<"i< 

£r£l . ,,d * "* aotal ™>d ma 
t.rial support. Plan to ao to 

tffug** * "As 

ito B d V _„ii„ k ! **» 

Tu.id.jr_ Mark i £2 

Thur«J.jr..Rom M . , ,£" 

S«turd.y„Jo.l J i7£ 



*», 



Linton's Barber Shop 
Walton. Kentucky 

Florence Deposit Bank 
Florence, Kentucky 

Walton Lumber Co. 

not* im& w -. 



'Hamilton and' Jones 
Walton, Kentucky. 



Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence, Kentucky 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 

Phone Walton 95 



«&* 



.mm iwo. ». a Kttmc. str M iM« Wl 

Conrad Hardware 

For Service, Large or Small, See Powers 

Dixie State Bank 

Walton, Kentucky 



Jfe^or's Qrocery 

Home c FiasxAaskSBaisdltables, Meata • 




Readnonr 

eed Phone Walton 154-< 

■^- ■i' 1 ''; ^ : : 



: ..... 



T .^a^gojyrft Grocery 

^SfflJSGfeii Get Quality and Price 

Community Public Service Co., Inc. 
Walton, Kentucky 



— 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 2, 1950 



PERSONALS...... 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Howard and 
family entertained on Sunday, Mr. 
and Mrs. Herchell Middleton, Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Deatherage and son 
of Covington; Mr. and Mrs. William 
Deatiherage and Robert of Kenton, 
and Mr. and Mrs. John- Ervin Ryan 
and son of Walton. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lebus Stephenson 
and daughter, Sherry, entertained 
at 7 o'clock dinner Monday evening 
for Mr. and Mrs. Sam Beighle and 
daughter, Joan. 

Many basketball fans attended 
the game played at Owingsville on 
Friday evening. 

Mrs. Hattie Pruett is ill at her 
i home. 



SEE 



NEED FAM | LY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



Phone w»<t«. «r- 514X 

Walton Cab Co. 

"Call Us For Quick Service" 

<•--■'„ 

REASONABLE RATES 



ANYWHERE! 



ANYTIME! 



Office at 70 South Main Street 



Levi Pennington entertained with 
a birthday dinner on Thursday eve- 
ning for Mrs. Pennington and their 
granddaughter, Bettie" Joyce Penn- 
ington. Those present were Mr. and 
Mrs. Aubrey Eckler, Mr. and Mrs. 
Leon Pennington, Mrs. Jimmle Penn- 
ington and son, James Wayne, Mr. 
and Mrs. Myrex Crouch, Mr. and 1 
Mrs. Herman Rader and son Melvin, 
and the host and hostess. 

Mrs. Sam Howard and daughter 
| are spending the week with Mr. and 
Mrs. Dan Isbell and family at Rus- 
sell Springs, Ky. 

Mrs. Mathew Flynn left Tuesday 
ia.m. to attend the Farm and Home 
Week Convntion in Lexington. 

Mrs. Leo Flynn and children 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. C. 
T. Pruett in Covington. 

Mrs. Leulah Smith is in the Good 
Samaritan hospital where she un- 
derwent an operation. 

David Ray Neumeister returned 
home last Thursday from the Oftll- 
drens Hospital where he was operat- 
ed' on for appendicitis. 

The many friends of Lacie Thorn- 
ton are glad to know she is home. 

Mis. Eddie Linton is quite ill and 
confined to her bed again ' 



FARMS! Din for Dough FARMS! 



CARD OF THANKS 

I wish to thank all my friends and 
relatives for the many prayers, kind 
words and cards sent me during my 
illness and stay in the hospital. 
lt-5* —Shelby Julius Acra! 
i - : 

TAX NOTICE 

Walton Tax for Rental and Occu- 
pational Liense were due January 
1st- payable ak City Hall from 1st 
to 5th of month or mail to Tax Col- 
lector, Edith Stephenson. 

Home For Sale 

Four rooms, strictly modern, drive- 
in basement, lot 95x370, in Verona, 
Ky. 

Harry F. Johnson 

PHONE IND. 6196 



BOONE COUNTY 

Forced To Sell On Account 
Of 111 Health— 

30-ACRE FARM, 4-room house, live- 
able but not completed; barn 
18x18; well fenced; everlasting 
spring, pond stocked with fish; 
good cow, horse, 12 chickens; gas- 
oline garden tractor, mowing ma- 
chine; sled, 75 bushels corn, 2800 
pounds lespedeza hay, 3 bushels 
potatoes, 5 bushels sweet potatoes, 
3 tons coal; 1936 Ford, in good re- 
pair; all goes for $6,500. On the 
Big Bone Church Road, 4 rnilefi 
from Union, Ky. Immediate pos- 
session. $2,200 cash! 

BOONE COUNTY, near Verona, on 
the new highway; 57 acres rich 
tobacco land, 1948 crop washes cwt. 
and 1949 crop 57 cwt.; this is a 
real producer and. moneymaker; 
has nice 5-room modern home, as 
in city ; large tobacco barn racked 
for tobacco; stripping room; up- 
to-date chicken house; corn crib 

full of corn; fenced and cross fenc- 
ed ; 2 ponds, cistern at house, creek 
in pasture; lots of nice shade trees 
in yard; $15,000 is the price of the 
farm alone. See owner, Walter 
Merrill, Verona State Road, or ex- 
clusive agent. 



BOONE COUNTY 

140 ACRES— 8-room Colonial home; 
2 miles from Burlington on Burl- 
ington and Bullittsville Road; the 
price, $20,000. 

125% ACRES — 5-rm. house; 2 barns; 
1 mile from Burlington on Burling- 
ton and Buildttsville .Road; see 
sign; $14,500 v 

202 ACRES— 6-room house;-, com- 
bination stock and tobacco barn; 
over 2 acres tobacco base; Rice 
Pike; $12,000. * 

GRANT COUNTY 

200 ACRES— 2 houses; 4 barns; 3% 
acres tobacco base; 1 mile from 
Flingsville on Crittenden and De- 
'mossville Pike; priced to sell at 
$13,000. 

56 ACRES — 5-room house, electric, 
telephone; 2 acres tobacco base; 
lot of ridge land; plenty of hay; 
8/10 mile from highway, on good 
blacktop road, near Dry Ridge; 
price $7,000. 

94 ACRES — Good 5-room house, 2- 
. room smoke house with basement; 
chicken house, corn crib, stripping 
room, 2 good barns; 2 acres tobacco 
base; 7 acres alfalfa, 15 acres of 
ridge land; watered by 3 springs, 
1 pond, 2 cjfcterns, creek and sul- 
phur spring that never runs dry; 
on good blacktop road, 4/10 mile 
from Taft Highway; $7,000. 



GRANT COUNTY 

217 ACRES — Good 5-room house; a 
nice 3- room tenant house; electric, 
telephone; 4 good barns; 4.4 acres 
tobacco base; 8 acres alfalfa, 28 
acres mixed hay; 60 or 70 acres 
bottim land, 20 acres ridge land; 
located in Owen county, on good 
rock road, 100 yards from Corinth 
and Lusby Mill Highway; $14,000. 

175 ACRES — 4-room house; oval 
shaped dairy barn, milk house; 3 
acres tobacco base; 20 acres alf- 
alfa; lot of ridge land; just little 
way off road; $5,000. 

20 ACRES — 6-room house; new 'barn; 
4 car garage; nice lawn; 1 acre 
tobacco base; on Taft Highway, 2 
miles from Dry Ridge. 

KENTON COUNTY 

69 ACRES — 3-room house, basement, 
electric; %barn; Visalia and Staf- 
fordsburg Pike; $6,500. 

98 ACRES— Modern dairy barn; 7- 
room house; Byrd Road; $14,500. 

149 ACRES— 6-room house; Alex- 
andria Station Road; $6,800. 

129 ACRES— House and barn; Rector 
Road; $8,500. 

150-ACRE tractor farm with over 100 
acres bottom land; 2 houses,, one 
7-room modern home and 2-room 
tenant house; dairy barn, silo, 2 
tobacco barns; over 2 acres tobacco 
base; near Visalia, on Decoursey 
Pike. 



REL C. WAYMAN & SONS 



Phone HEmlock 5107 



REAL ESTATE & AUCTION BROKERS 
623 Washington Street 



Covington, Ky. 



Grant County Information: 

B. H. BLAIR, Agent in Grant County 



Williamstown Phones: 2679 or 7351 



Williamstown, Kentucky 



ADJUSTMENT 




Due to the fire on our premises, an insurance adjustment has been made, therefore we will offer our stock, consisting of Men's, Women's, Children's Work and Dress Clothes, 
Shoes, Rubber Footwear, and Dry Goods at '-■•/•" ** 

This merchandise must go regardless of our 
loss to make room for Spring Goods. Take 
advantage of these Tremendous Values .' . . 



PRECES FAR BELOW COST! 



SALE STARTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2nd 

HERE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE MANY ITEMS THAT MUST GO . . . HUNDREDS OF OTHER ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION . . . 

~ ° Regu^r 2.98 Ladies' 

WASH DRESSES 



Regular 2.98 

WORK PANTS 

"Big Yank" Grey Covert, f\m- 

heavy weight, sanforized, ^wif 
limited quantity W t \* 



Regular 1.89 * 

WORK SHIRTS 

"Big Yank" Coverts and m _ 

Chambray, sanforized, mL§ f 

limited quantity " ^* 



Regular 1.98 

WASH DRESSES 

Children's, fast colors, _ _ 

80x80, limited quantity ___■_„. 3 / C 



assorted prints, fast f olors, 
80x80, limited quantity .... 



Reg. 9.95 Men's P-COATS, "Big Yank," 
100% wool, blue flannel lined ........ $6.77 

Reg. 6.98 Men's JACKETS, 

100% wool $4.77 



Reg. 3.98 Men's SPORT SHIRTS, 

long sleeves Lii $1.97 

Reg. 1.98 Chambray SHIRTS, 

"Big Yank" $1.17 



Reg. 4.98 Girls' SNO-PANTS 

lined ___,_..; ... $2.77 

Reg. 2.98 Girls' SNO-PANTS $1.77 



Reg. 2.98 Covert PANTS, "Big Yank," 
heavy grade $1.77 

Reg. 1.98 SHIRTS, blue chambray, 
"Big Yank" $1.17 



Regular 4.98 and 3.98 

BOYS PANTS 

part wool, pleated, zipper 
closure, sizes 6 to 18, 
limited quantity 



2.77 



Regular 5.98 

BOYS JACKETS 

"Big Yank" 100% wool, Q FJ FJ 
zipper, limited quantity O* i i 



Regular 3.98 

Ladies Sweaters 

100% virgin wool slipover, -| /m fm 
assorted colors, limited I / / 

quantity 



Regular 45c 

PRINTS 

fast colors, asst. patterns, 
limited quantity — yard 



Reg. 15.95 Boys' COATS, % length, 
100% wool, fleece $6.77 

Reg. 8.95 Boys' P-COATS, 

"Big Yank," 100% wool $5.77 



Reg. 2.98 Flannel SHIRTS, 

"Big Yank" $1.77 

Reg. 59c Ladies PANTIES, rayon, 

brief or leg style 47 



Reg. 3.98 Girls' SKIRTS, pleated _ $1.97 
Reg. 2.98 Girls' SKIRTS, pleated .. $1.17 
Reg. 1.98 Girls SKIRTS, pleated 97c 



Reg. 1.39 Children's BIB ALLS, 
sanforized, "Big Yank" .„_.. 77c 

Reg. 3.49 Men's PANTS, 

"Big Yank," sanforized ., $1.97 



. Regular 4£ 

Childrens Hose 

% length, fine rib, 
limited quantity 



Regular 1.98 

Childrens Sweaters 

100% virgin wool, coat or 
slipover, limited quantity 



77c 



Regular 2.98 

Boys Sweaters 

1.27 



coat style, 2-tone, 
limited quantity 



Regular 1.89 

Mens Overall Pants 

"Big Yank" 2-oz. sanf., 
limited quantity 



97c 



Reg. 2.98 Girls' SWEATERS, 

100% wool ....... $1.17 



Reg. 98c Children's SLIPS, satin, 

"Phil Maid" . ...... ..... 77c 



Reg. 1.39 Boys OVERALLS 
and BIBALLS __.. ! 



77c 



Reg. 1.98 Boys' SHIRTS, . 

flannel, sanforized $1.17 



13-15 DIXIE HIGHWAY 
ERLANGER, KY. 

THE BARGAIN HOUSE" 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 



All Sales Final - No Refunds 
or Exchanges. Positively No 
Merchandise Sold to Dealers! 



S!Mliifcai8IM< 



Thursday, February 2, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 



—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



■ FOR SALE — Frying chickens, dress- 
ed or on foot. Call Mrs. Shepherd. 
Phone Walton 1813. lt-4 

, FOR SA"LE— 19 Red Ruroc shoats, 
weigh about 10Q libs, or more; one 
purebred Guernsey bull calf. S. 
B. Setter, manager, Maple Lawn 
Farm, 4 miles South of Walton, on 
U. S. 25. lt-5* 

FOR SALE— Baby beef, suitable for 

• locker or deep freeze; will sell 

whole or iby quarters; also pigs. 

Ira Stephenson, Walton- Nicholson 

Road. Phone Ind. 6742. 4t-2 



FOR SALE— Hay, first, second, third 
and fourth cutting alfalfa; also 
Lespedeza and timothy; good clean 
straw; all baled. J. E. Huff, 4 
miles South of Walton, 1% miles 
North oi Crittenden, on Wes side 
railroad. Phone Ind. 6499. 4t-4* 



CHICKS and Hatching Eggs from 
high producing, pullorum- tested 
Reds. Breeders immunized against 
Newcastle. Chicks from such a 
flock can make money for you. 
Grant Maddox, Florence. Phone 
384. 6t-2 



30-GALLON Hot Water Heater, good 
as new, half of new price. Clifford 
Pruett, 74 North Main St., Walton. 

lt-5 

FOR RENT— Three -room apartment, 
unfurnished, heat and water fur- 
nished. W. W. Ryle, 44 South Main 
St., Walton. Phone 26. tf-4 



FOR SALE — Combination Mosler 
safe, cheap. Mrs. Helen Jaeger, 
Independence, Ky. lt-5* 



RUSSELL'S REFRIGERATOR and 
APPLIANCE REPAIR — Freezers, 
refrigerators, milk coolers, motors, 
pumps, etc.; also limited number 
rebuilt refrigerators, guaranteed 
for whole year. Phone Ind. 7430. 

4t-2* 



FOR SALE— Kenmore table-top kero- 
sene stove, $15.00, if sold at once; 
also metal all-white Coolerator, 
holds 100 lbs. ice, in nice condi- 
tion, $10.00. Ott Snelling, Walton, 
Ky., near Richwood: 2t-4* 



STURGEON 

Electrical Service 

—Wiring of All Kinds—; 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 
—Phone 71 or 1396— 



FARMS WANTED— Small or- large; 
we have a large list of customers 
waiting. For quick, reliable realty 
service, calf us. Sallee Real Estate 
Co., 108 Locust St., Erlanger, Ky. 
Phone Dixie 7119. tf-4 



FOR SALE — 194& Pontiac Station 
Wagon, perfect condition. Call 
Walton 542. Wilson Case. 4t-4 



WANT TO BUY— Dead Stock; horses 
$2.50; cows $2.50; hogs 50c owt, 
according to size and condition. 
Phone Walton, day 178, night 772, 
or Butler 6901. Griffin Fertilizer 
Co. tf-1 



FOR SALE— 1931 model "A" Ford, 
A-l condition, $85.00. Phone Ind. 
6737. 2t-4 



PLUMBING & HEATING— Repairs or 
new installations, furnace clean- 
ing and service on stokers, gas or 
oil furnaces. Tri-County Heating 
and Plumbing Co. Florence 593. 

tf-49 



FOR SALE— Two work horses, 8 yrs. 
old. G. R. Epperly, Bullock Pen 
Road. Phone Ind: 6696. ' 4t-2* 



FOR SALE— Two nice big mares, 
$75.00; Call after 6:00 p. m., Henry 
Harrison, Morning View, Ky. Ph. 
Ind. 6709. 2t-5 



FOR SALE— Hay, baled, alfalfa 1-2- 
3 cutting; soy bean hay and mix 
ed hay. Ind. 6882, evenings, tt-3 



WANTED— Hay tedder in good op 
erating condition, also. go»d No. 1 
or No. 2 corn and good heavy oats. 
Address Box 419; Route 5, Latonia 
Sta., Covington, Ky., or phone Ind. 
6882, evenings. tt-3 



Hadacol Helps Folk 
Music Fiddle Player 



James William Martin, of route 
4, Lewisburg, Tenn., has been a 
familiar and popular figure at 
thousands of old fashioned enter- 
tainments throughout Tennessee 
since he was just a boy because 
the oldtimers claim that young 
Bill can really make a bull fiddle 
talk "sweet music." 

These fans really missed Mar- 
tin's music when he did not ap- 
pear in his regular program on 
the great 50,000 watt WLAC radio 
station in Nashville, Term., re 
cently. In fact, they missed him 
for the two weeks that he suf 
ferred the horrors of nervous in 
digestion and kindred ills. 




James William Martin 

They will be happy to know 
now that Bill is back with the 
bull fiddle and it seems to some 
that the music is just a little 
sweeter because Bill feels better 
now than he 'ever did before be- 
cause he has learned the blessings 
of HADACOL. 

Here is Martin's own statement 
about the blessings that HADA- 
COL brought to him: 

"I am only 24 years old but 
have suffered with the horrors of 
nervous indigestion. No food I ate 
digested well. I suffered severe 
headaches. I had difficulty sleep- 
ing. I have played with. radio 
"bands and nervous indigestion ef- 
fected my work. I was run down 

and nervous and for a time | Demand the genuine HADACOL. 
thought I would have to give up | Accept no substitutes 



my work. After the second bottle 
of HADACOL I felt better and 
now after five bottles of HADA- 
COL I feel like I am a new man. 
I am going to continue to take 
HADACOL to help keep well." 

Martin is just one of countless 
thousands who suffered because 
of a deficiency of B vitamins and 
certain minerals-,; which HADA- 
COL brought to him. 

A lack of only a small amount 
of the B Vitamins and certain 
Minerals will cause digestive dis- 
turbances . . . Your food will not 
agree with you . . . You will 
have an upset stomach . .- . You 
wjll suffer from heartburns, gas 
pains, and your food will sour on 
your stomach, and you will not 
be able to eat the things you like 
for fear of being in misery after- 
wards. Many people .also suffer 
from constipation. And while 
these symptoms may be the re- 
sults of other causes, they are 
surely and Certainly the symp- 
toms and signs of the lack of the 
B Vitamins and Minerals which 
HADACOL contains. And if you 
suffer from such a disorder, there 
is no known cure except the ad- 
ministration of the Vitamins and 
the Minerals which your system 
lacks. 

HADACOL contains not only 
one, but 5 of the B Vitamins. 
HADACOL contains not only one, 
but 4 of the necessary Minerals. 
It comes to you in liquid form, 
easily assimilated in the blood 
stream so that it can go to work 
right away. 

It is easy to understand, there- 
fore, why countless thousands 
have already been benefited by 
this amazing tonic, HADACOL. 

So, it matters not who you are 
... it matters not where you live 
. . . or if you have tried all the 
medicines under the sun, give 
this . wonderful preparation a 
trial. Don't go on suffering! Don't 
continue to lead a miserable life. 
Many persons who have suffered 
and waited for 10 to 20 years or 
even longer, are able now to, live 
happy, comfortable lives again 
because HADACOL supplied the 
Vitamins and Minerals which 
their systems needed. Be fair to 
yourself. Give HADACOL a trial. 



GRANT 

/iiiwMSTowN.Ky 



MS 2020 



SATURDAY ONLY FEB. 4 

2 ACTION HITS 2 

hit no. 1 

Charles Starrett — in 

"SOUTH OF DEATH VALLEY" 

hit no. 2 

Dennis O'Keefe — in 

"HAW DEAL" 



2 DAYS . . .STARTING SUNDAY 



Samuel 



^~Ny^ Shellabarger's «■» y 

J*RIN€E ofJCOXES 

TYRONE POWER. ORSON WELLES 
WANDA HENDRIX 2a 



TUE. & WED. 



FEB. 7<-ii 



4 M0R6AH* QAY* GdRSON 



VKW 



\tsa 

v *. : Technicolor 






THUR. & FBI. FEB. 9 - 10 

2 BIG HITS 2 

—Hit No. 1— 

Gene Autry — in 

"RIDERS IN THE SKY" 

-^Hit No. 2— 

Donald Huston — in 

"BLUE LAGOON" 



FOR SALE— Overhead steel garage 
doors, complete with fixtures. 
John Gault, Jr., Walton Phone 607. 

. 2t-5* 



FO 



R SALE — Young male hog. 
Phone Ind. 6869. 
for sale, Boys Suit, size 14, 



$35. 

lt-5* 

also 



FOR RENT— Sleeping room, also 
reversible coat, size 12. 99 South 
Main st, Walton. lt-5* 



FOR SALE — Young white brood sow 
with first litter of pigs, 4 pigs left 
8 weeks old. Phone Ind. 5012. 

2t-5 

FOR SALE— Hag, straw, corn, alfal- 
fa, mjxed hay and timothy, wheat 
or oat -straw. Russell Klein, 
Morning Viey, Ky. Phone Ind. 6427 

6t-5* 



FOR SALE — Man's brown overcoat; 
Coal and wood cook stove, in good 
condition. John Roberts, 37 High 
St., Walton. lt-5* 

FOR SALE— Alfalfa hay and straw; 
wire fence, barb wire, metal gates 
Field seed of all kinds; all kinds 
of Dairy and Poultry Feed. Walton 
& Readnour, Walton, Ky. Phone 
154. 2t-5 



FOR SALE— Coal and wood range, 
white enamel in good condition, 
priced reasonable. Mrs. Claude 
Reeves, R. 1, Walton, Ky. on the 
Wright Road off Bank Lick Road. 

lt-5* 

Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



AUCTION 

Due to the death of my husband,%we are dissolving our partnership of Stock, Tools, 
Feed and Furniture — j 

South End of Independence, Ky. 



ON THE LLL HIGHWAY 



Sat., Feb. 1 1 



9:30 
a. 



. AS— HEAD OF LIVESTOCK— 45 

10 head of Holstein cows, all young; 10 Guernsey & Jersey cows; this is a fine herd 
of dairy cows; 8 fresh, others to be fresh soon. Four Holstein heifers, bred; 9 year- 
W Holstein & Jersey heifers. Two broodsows, weigh about 400 lbs. ; 8 gilts, about 
250 lbs.; boar, about 250 lbs., all O. I. C; scalding pan; riding mare. 
International tractor, model C, 2-way plow, disc harrow, mower, 2-row cultivator, 
lime spreader, power take-off, all International tools, almost new ; manure spreader, 
cultrpacker; horse tools — riding cultivator, section harrow, John Deere mower, hay 
rake, iron-Wheel wagon, box and hay bed. 4-can milk coolej-, 2-unit milker, 8 ten- 
gallon milk cans, vat; all kinds of small farming toos, everything you need. 
About 40 tons alfalfa hay, baled; 200 bales straw; 300 bushels corn ; 125 bu. wheat. 
Six rooms of furniture — some of this is antique; 2 two-piece living room suites, 
black walnut; 5-piece bed room suite; chairs; heating stove; cook stove; large 
refrigerator; furniture of all kinds; 20 bushels potatoes; 1 bushel gladioli bulbs; la 
rge amount of canned fruit. This is one ofthe largest sales to be held in this section 
for a long time: — come early — sale starts at 9 : 30 a. m. sharp; co wsale starts at 1 :30, 

—LUNCH ON GROUNDS— 

Farm of 135 acres, one of the best in Northern Kentucky, for sale privately — see 



the 



owner or agent. 



Allie Allnutt & Mrs. M. C. Cox 

Sale Conducted By 

HARRY F. JOHNSON 

Real Estate and Auction Broker 
JOHNSON, ELLIOTT & TANNER, Auctioneers CARL JUSTICE, Clerk 



W 



* 

Chevrolet alone 
in the low-price field gives you highest dollar value 
. . . famous Fisher Body . . . lower cost motoring! 




FIRST.. 

and Finest . . . at Lowest Cost! 



The Styleline Do Luxe 4-Door Sedan 



w 



CHEVROLET 




AMERICA'S BEST SELLER . . . AMERICA'S BEST BUYI 



Here's your buy for 1950 ... for all the things you want in a 
motor car at lowest cost ... the new Chevrolet with Style- 
Star Body by Fisher! 

It's the one and only low-priced car that offers you a choice 
of automatic or standard drive . . . with the thrilling new 
Powerglide Automatic Transmission and new 105-h.p. 
Valve-in-Head Engine for finest automatic drive results 
and with a highly -tmproved, more powerful Valve-in-Head 
engine and the famous -Silent Synchro-Mesh Transmission 
for finest standard drive results— at lowest cost. . 



Chevrolet— and Chevrolet alone— brings you all that, advantages at 
lowest cost! NEW STYLE-STAR BODIES BY FISHER . . . NEW TWO- 
TONE FISHER INTERIORS . . . CENTER-POINT STEERING AND UNITIZED 
KNEE-ACTION RIDE . . . CURVED WINDSHIELD WITH PANORAMIC 
VISIBILITY . . . BIGGEST OF ALL LOW-PRICED CARS . . . PROVED 
CERTI-SAFE HYDRAULIC BRAKES . . . EXTRA-ECONOMICAL TO OWN, 
OPERATE AND MAINTAIN. 



PQW ERi^M 



AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION 



Combination of Powerglide Transmission and 105-h.p. Engine 
optional on De Luxe models at extra cost. * 



■m^ 






DIXIE CHEVROLET SALES 






Phone 95 

w 



3)ei" •' "-' '"> 



Walton, Ky- 



O 






"V 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 2, 1950 



BABY CHICKS 



v 



ARE HERE! 



OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 

WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 

POULTRY LITTER - REMEDIES 

TUXEDO FEEDS 



Licensed and Approved by Kentucky Department of Agriculture 



Garden Seed » Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 




Quality Plumbing Fixtures 
MAKE YOUR BATHROOM H 
MODERN 

Truly modern, efficient homes demand 
die best in plumbing, and heatirg. Btt? 
American-Standard Plumbing l : i\m - ; 
and be sure of the best make your bath 
and powdflf room distincti*^. a room like 
the one shown here, that you can point to 
with pride. The superb Westrr Pembroke 
Batfc,, quiet Master One-. -cc* Water 
Closet and convenient Companion Lava- 
tory assure years of larring satisfaction 
See these beautiful units today . ■ in 
lustrous white or your <:ioice of a wide 
variety of lovely colors. 




Let Us Help You Build or Rev id . ... Get Frdl Dctarfs Now 

VCe alsn i:ar.d!e AjBtadcas-Scnfldard ITcatirs Z" pmenr. for all fucb, for 
radiator anc! warm a'r jy .:~>3. for cv; , r'-r: hoi \o. C/c xHil be jt1«1 to inspect 
yo-jr preserr 1 jrt'i.ifi v.- . Sum hi a? i :.'[.\iior.\ atvl help you plan conoJcte 

room modern ;zrr"-i n- t '"■■; -•. •: f ■ ' : ;•' i u •i' <: . v.\ ' out co-t or oVvrraron. 
You can pry for mo 'c; - t ■ : c . t c " :- - .„'" ■'•'-■» > •"" Convenient .- iocs plan- 
Complete S'les ^nci inc. in cr call today. 

A. & M. SUPPLY CO. 

106 East Fourth Street Covington, Ky. 

Phone— JUniper 3500 



Services for Joseph T. Higgins, 77, 
who succumbed Wednesday at his 
home on Burlington Road, Florence, 
were held Monday from the Allison 
and Rose funeral home, Covington. 
Mr. Higgins was a former resident of 
Carlisle, Ky. * He was a member of 
Madison Avenue Christian Church. 
He leaves a brother, Columbus C. 
Higgins, Glencoe, and a sister, Mrs. 
Sally Wharton/' Covington. Burial 
was in Highland Cemetery. Sym- 
pathy is extended the family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Howard 
and daughter Lois and Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Amnion recently motored to 
Dayton, Ohio to visit Mrs. Howard!s 
brother, Elroy ReVore, and wife. Mr. 
ReVore is confined to a Dayton Hos- 
pital. 

. Mrs. Geo. B. Miller and Mrs. W. 
R. Miller were callers on Blayne 
Miller and Barbee Simpson of Park 
Hills.- 

•■Ben Myers, Al England and fri- 
ends of Sayler Park, Ohio were bus- 
iness callers here Wednesday even- 
ing. Many years ago, when the 



{Mm 



For the Best In Heating 

phon o 

J arman Heating Service 

WALTON ... 524 or 921 
Engineered Heating— Coal, Oil, 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



Florence fair was organized, Mr. 
England was the teamster who 
hauled logs to the mill located on 
the fair grounds, which was a part 
of the late Perry Carpenter farm, to 
toe sawed into lumber with which to 
construct the large ampitheatre and 
other necessary buildings. The late 
Frank Russell was contractor for the 
hauling. 

Mr. and Mrs., Mat Horton of Lud- 
low, friends of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. 
Tanner, were their guests Thursday. 

Harris Carpenter of Kensington, 
was the dinner guest of his uncle, 
Eldridge Carpenter, and wife Fri 
day evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Marshall and 
young son are at home after having 
enjoyed a. pleasant vacation in Fla. 

We wish to clear up a little mis- 
understanding concerning the new 
location of Mr. and Mrs. Cam Ken- 
nedy, which is in Walton, on BeaVer 
Road, about one square from the 
Dixie Highway. 



L. J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

and . 

OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 0535 

Office Hours . . . 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Mrs. George Miller spent Wednes- 
day in Covington, shopping and vis- 
iting with her daughter, Mrs. Frank 
Hogan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Carpenter 
were entertained by their daughter, 
Mrs. Richard Keyer, and Mr. Keyer of 
Latonia, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Arnold ttnd 
Verne Arnold and family called at 
the home of John Klopp of Peters- 



I burg for whom funeral services were 
held Sunday. Burial was , in the 
Petersburg Cemetery. 

Wedding bells will foe ringing on 
Price Road in the near future. 

Elmer Moore of Madison county 
got an average of more than 25 eggs 
per hen in one month from his flock 
of 516 crossbred Hampshire-Barred 
Rook birds. 



JOE KENNEDY'S 



GAY 90s CLUB 

DANCING THREE NIGHTS EACH WEEK . . . 

Friday, Saturday and Sunday! 

Music By 

Lee Rolph & His Kentucky Play Boys 

Square and Popular Dancing 



"Gayest Spot On U. S. 25" 

REFRESHMENTS! 
4 Miles South of Walton Phone Ind. 6495 



.*-*> 



frmm m 



HOOT, MOM, I'M THRIFTY! 




Mr. and Mrs. Worth Boone property, 8-room Colonial 2-story frame home and 
about 1 acre, fronting on U. S. Highway 42 — 12 to 16 choice home sites fronting 100 
feet on U. S. 42 and 50 to 100 feet on Hicks Pike — also some chattels — 

AT AUCTION 

Sat., Feb. 4- 1 p. m. 



Fast 
Time 



EVEN a Scotchman would be glad to have me on the 
payroll.' I still work for pre-war wages, and the more 
work I do the less I cost per hour. 

No job is too big for me and no hours too long. Every 
day, in many ways, I help you enjoy better and easier 
living, and at the same time save you time, work and 
money. 

Just for fun, divide your next electric bill by the number 
of days in the month to get my daily pay. Then think of 
all the jobs I do and you'll agree that I represent by far 
die biggest bargain in your household budget. 

REDDY KILOWATT 
Your Electric Servant 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED _ 

1/oh* QtimnMf CUcbic Company 



Located on U. S. A, in the heart of Boone county. IV2 miles Southwest of Union, Ky.. 6 rniles. South- 
west of Florence, Ky.. and 15 miles from Covington and Cincinnati, near the New Haven High school. 
See banners. Mr. and Mrs. Worth Boone, due to the pressure of business, have decided to dispose of 
this property and have authorized us to conduct this sale at Absolute Auction on the above date, 
regardless of price or weather. You make the price— they make the deeds. 

8-ROOM COLONIAL HOME— This 8-room colonial home is in first class condition, within and 
without; it is substantial, newly papered; has nice fireplaces and woodwork, new gutters, etc. It 
is located on about 1 acre of ground with nice frontage on Highway 42. Supplied with an abund- 
ance of shade, nice shrubbery and fruit trees, and a large cistern. Improvements also consist of 
2-car garage, poultry house, all needed outbuildings. Cabinet sink in kitchen; two porches. This 
is one of the prettiest locations in Boone county, affording all the convejrtences of the city in peace- 
ful country surroundings. Electricity, telephone, daily bus service, ne*t door to an excellent high 
school, grocery-bakery truck to door. Just 20 minutes drive from (Meteropolitan Cincinnati. This 
would make^an ideal tourist home, affording a nice view of U. S. 42 for a mile and surrounded by 
well-kept farms and homes. 

CHOICE HOME SITES— These home sites front on U. S. 42 and Hicks Pike, just off the Highway. 
Contain 100 feet on U. S. Highway 42 and 50 to 100 feet on Hicks Pike, toeing about 250 feet deep. 
Have all above conveniences, good drainage, well located, nicely landscaped. In the heart of Boone 
county, in one of highest, dryest, pretties spots. All the conveniences of the city and still they af- 
ford a flavor of the good old country atmosphere. Arranged so that you may have enough ground 
for a .garden, chickens, fruit trees, etc. One ideal business site, fronting Hicks Pike, near intersec- 
tion with U. S. 42 at New Haven school. Blueprints available day of sale, showing exact locations. 

CHATTELS — Lot of White Leghorn laying hens, good layers; lot of household goods, small tools, 
McCormiiok-iDeering mower, 2 breaking plows, stump puller and cables, doubletrees, singletrees, 
neck yokes, hames, stretchers, small set block and tackle, mowing scythe, saw and mandrel for 
table rip saw, block and pulleys, rook drill, new set harness, hay loader. 

TERMS — Chattels, cash day of sale; real estate. 20% cash day of sale, balance in 30 days with deed 
and possession. 

A PERSONAL MESSAGE— Jlere is the opportunity of a lifetime to putyqur idle- money" to work 
by buying a nest egg in (Mother Earth; a chance to get an ideal country home, -out of the smoke 
and dirt of the city, in peaceful country surroundings, for the purchase price bid, when put* at auc- 
tion. Don't wish youjhad. Be there and bid your judgment. - 

FREE— Cash money at opening and during sale— FREE I (Tou must be present when name is called) 
For details or appointment to see this property — See or Call Day or Night 



Bradford-Worthington & Co. 

LUCIAN BRADFORD, Sales Manager A REALTY & AUCTION CO. 

Col. Lute Bradford, Florence 229 Col. A. F. Worthington, Walton 671 

<* "If It's Real Service You Want— Employ Ua" ^ 



I 



Thursday, February 2, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Seven 



| CONCORD ROAD 



Mrs. Stella Collins of Elliston 
Station was calling on (Mrs. Delia 
Braun and Mr. Braun, Saturday af- 
ternoon. 

Sallie Whitson, Althea Craft and 
Iris Hughes attended the W. M. U. 
quarterly meeting at Vine Run 
Church last Tuesday. 



. Mr. and Mrs. Jim Lamn and Lizzie 
Noel were visiting at the W. E. Wal- 
ler home Sunday after church. 

Mrs. H. D. Edrington was visiting 
her daughter,' Mr. and Mrs. Harvey 
Hughes, Thursday. 

The W. M. U. of Concord will meet 
at the church February 8th. Be there 
by 1:30, EST. 

Sorry to hear of Mrs. Ethel Web 
ster being sick. Hope/for her early 
recovery. 



■ 



At AUCTION 

35 Head of Choice Registered and Grade Wisconsin 
and Imported Canadian Holstein Cows — 

Friday, Feb. 3rd at 10:30 a. m. 

I will sell at my barn located 12 miles West of Frankfort 
and 8 miles East of Shelby ville.at Peytona r Ky., on U. 
S. 60, the following: 

A clean herd of choice fresh and close springer cows, 10 of which 
are registered imported Canadian Holstein cows with papers. They 
have plenty of breeding and have high butter fat records. These 
cows are of good blood lines and have style, type and producing 
ability. All are capable of producing 50 to 70 pounds daily. Also 
25 head of choice fresh and close springer grade Holstein cows from 
Canada and Wisconsin. These are large cows with style, type and 
good color. All cows are good uddered and were selected with care 
from the better herds. Some are from certified herds and each cow 
will be sold with individual health sheets. 

If you are interested in choice cows, both registered and grade, 
attend this auction where good cows and buyers meet Sale held 
in heated sale pavillion. 

Your Inspection Invited Any Time. Terms: Cash. 

Edward Masters 

SHELBYVILLE, KENTUCKY 

Phones: Waddy (Residence) 2539 - Waddy (Barn) 2704 
AUCTIONEER: J. HAYDEN IGLEHEART 



Ha milton & Jones invites y ou to sh op i 

Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" 
— — feOWEST PRICES 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



THE NEW DE LAVAL STERLING SPEEDETTE 



mmmmmmwrnm 



i 




*19 SPEEDETTE 

VACUUM PUMP 
— Mvtr requires 
oiling, direct-con- 
nected to motor; 

110 V orjenlion. 



NEW STtNUII 

■E unit STUIINI 

«| SPEEDWAY HIT 

—for best milking. 

UtiMl cleeninj, 

long III*. 



« A ^***mM,jUM^m*M*m**i 



Especially Designed 
for the Man Who 
Milks Ten Cows 
or Less! . 

The new Oe Laval Sterling Speed- 
ette is designed especially for the 
man milking 10 cows or less. Your 
pocketbooK can afford it — and you 
can't afford to be without it! It will 
save up to 68 lull working days a 
year on a 10-cow herd, save you 
countless steps, do the milking In 
half the time and produce more and 
cleaner milk (or you. See it today! 



mttWRll toVourToughest 
^ Plowing Requirements! 




For a plow with 
plenty of brute 
strength . . . high 
lift for easy turning 
and transporting . . . 
plus the extra clear- 
ance necessary for 
deep plowing in 
trashy conditions, 
you'll find a John 
Deere Trust-tram* 
Plow unsurpassed. 
Its many features 
make it a real leader 
in two., three-, and 
four-bottom plow 
value. See us for 
fall details . . . soon. 



JOHN DEERE TRUSS-FRAME PLOWS 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 

110 PIKE STREET COVINGTON, KY. 



Quite a few attended the sale of 
Miss Nannie O'Hara's at Verona on 
Saturday afternoon. We are sorry 
to lose Miss O'Hara, she having sold 
her house to Mr. arid Mrs. Warren 
Rich. Miss O'Hara is going to make 
her home in Covington. 

Billy Mac Waller and Ralph 
Adams spent the weekend with their 
parents. They returned to school 
Monday. 

Mrs. Flonnie Edrington was call- 
ing on Mrs. Pattie Willeford, Wed- 
nesday afternoon. 

Iris Hughes, Ollie Robinson and 
Margaret Whitson left Monday with 
their Homemaker leader, Miss Jew- 
ell Wilson, for Lexington to spend 
the week at the Farm and Home 
Convention. 

Kentuckians 
In Washington 

By Gil Kingsbury 

Three wartime heroes held a re- 
union in Washington last week and 
their talk turned to a Kentucky 
comrade, now dead. 

The three were among the six boys 
who raised that flag on Iwo Jima 
and were immortalized in that fa- 
mous picture. 

They talked about Pfc. Franklin 
R. Sousley of Ewing, Ky., who is now 
departed. And they talked about 
two other comrades who died in the 
Pacific War. 

Of the three who came to Wash- 
ington, one, a full blooded Indian, is 
a farmer. Another is studying to be 
an airline. pilot; and the'third is an 
undertaker. ' 

And above every thing else, all 
three want to forget and enjoy the 
peace and quiet of civilian life. 
Barley to Perform: 

Vice President Barkley is going to 
toe guest star on that television show 
"Who Said That." 

The Veep will perform on Satur- 
day when the Radio Correspondents 
Association give its annual dinner 
for President Truman. 

Others who will take part include 
the Vice President's old friend, Bob 
Hope, Senator Wherry and H. V. 
Kaltenborn. 




The dinner is an annual event and 
brings out the cream of official 
Washington from the president 
down. * 

Pity The Lawmaker: i 

Someone once said the Congress- 
men and Senators are a combina- 1 
tion of lawmakers and errand boys. 
Maq legislators' time is consumed; 
with petty jobs. For example, this' 
week a lady wrote Senator Withers. 
It seems that she is making a quilt 
and to complete her work she need- 1 
ed two ties. 

"Would you toe so kind," she 
wrote, "as to send me two of your 
neckties?" j 

We know of another Congressman 
who was asked to get a pencil from 
each member of the lower house. A 
young son of the family makes a 
hobby of collecting pencils, the 
writer explained. 
Kentucky On Top: 

Kentucky came out all right in 
the president's budget — as far as 
flood control is concerned. 

The biggest item in the entire ^ 
Ohio Valley is a $22,000,000 approp- 
riation for Wolfe Creek Dam down 
in the southern part of the state.' 
When the project is complete, Ken-; 
tucky will ihave another great <man-i 
made lake for hunters and fisher- 
men. 

There was money included, too, 
far Dewey Reservoir, another big 
project in Floyd county. And the 
president also recommended $50,000 
to "continue the survey for the Fal- 
mouth Dam. 
Do You Know: 

A Kentuckianl Paul Keen, is about 
to toe named assistant superintend- 
ent of the largest hospital an Wash- 
ington. Mr. Keen is vice president 
of the Kentucky Society of Wash- 
ington . . . Msgr. C. A. Towell of Lud- 
low was a recent visitor in the cap- 
ital. He is interested in the progress 
of Kentucky's 'hospitals . .". Ed Seiller 
former state treasurer, is moving in- 
to a new home in Virginia. He is 
now deputy governor of the Farm 
Credit Administration . . . Congrat- 
ulations to Boone County's Ben Zim- 
mer for his selection of Clarence 
West to be 'his publicity officer for 
the infantile paralysis drive. He's 
got a good man. 

Dan Broady, 4-H'er in Hart county, 
sold 506 pounds of tobacco for $285.94 
or an average of $56.51 per cwt. 

Ninety-three tobacco crops grown 
by 4-H'ers in 11 central Kentucky 
counties totaled 76,518 pounds, sell- 
ing at an average of $50.32 per cwt. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY F1NAMCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave, Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES —» 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Yards 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market in the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to us. Why 
not now? . . 

Reference: «Ask the first 
man you meet 




MASTER MIX 

»..'; COMPLETE 

V^L~' CONCENTRATES 
3SE' AND 

'V4' STRAIGHT FEEDS 



Bring In 250 lbs. Corn and Mix with 100 lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig Starter at a low cost of only $3.15 per 100 lbs. 

Walton Feed Mill 

Incorporated 




When The Crash 

Conies — Be 

Protected 

f-Jy&iutual Insurance 
^^ Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON. KJT. 





DR. PAUL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



There Is (ART) In ARTISTIC 



—FREE CALL & DELIVERY— 
16 South. Main St. Phone 144 Walton, Ky. 



Fur Coats Cleaned & Glazed 

Altering Invisible Reweaving 

Relining Dyeing 

Leather and Suede Jackets Refinished Like New 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quality Work . . . Guaranteed 
— All Garments Insured — 



I. C. GAINES -Pro P .^DAVE WORKMAN 



RAY HALL 

Manufacturing Optician 

Doctor's Optical Prescriptions 

Accurately; Filled, Broken 

Lenses Replaced. Expert 

Optical Repairing 

122 PIKE ST. COVINGTON 
HEmlock 1992 



W. R. McGUIRE 

MOVING 

AND EXPRESSING 
■ Local and Long Distance 
Packing, dating and Shipping 

—18 YEARS EXPERIENCE— 

Office . . . Second Floor 

32 Dixie Highway, Erlanger. Ky. 

PHONE DIXIE 8145 



Pontiac Trade-In Sale 



Examine These Bargains Before You Buy! 



—DEAD STOCK — 

REMOVED PROMPTLY 

Horses. $2.50 • Cows, $2.50 

Hogs, 25c cwt 

According to Size & Condition 

Call Otis Readnour 

WALTON 178 

or Butler 6901. collect! 

Griffin Fertilizer Co. 

Home Owned & Operated 



riJEV '46 Sedan; black; driven $*|W\r? 
LiIlV. little; radio; heater __* !"•/*) 

DAMT ' 47 2 ' Tone Grey: 17 ' 000 $1 QQC 

I UIll. miles; radio; heater 1-35/D 

rilEV ' 46 Station Wa e° n: $1 flQC 
LntiY. fully equipped. — IwD 

DI VM 49 Se ^ n; maroon ; s l 70 C 

I Link radio; heater; extras * • *Jv 

1/Ul/U. black; good car '— OVD 

CAD ft 47 Su P er Dtluxe Sedan; H AQC 
rUKU red; fully equipped 1U*JJ 



Most cars have radios and heaters. 
All are one-owner cars traded in 



DAMT '48 Hy dramatic Sedan; $* CQC 
I Utile grey; radio; heater HKJD 

DANT >48 4<Dt>or: 2 " Tone; $ 1AQ e % 

lUll I. less than 13,000 miles — AV«/*J 

tlUIi n maroon finish 1WD 

rUKD maroon; clean 1U"«J 

DUltlv Special "8" WO 

PONT, n™; - $ 695 

Kentucky licenses and tax free, 
on the NEW '50 PONTIACS. 






Terms to Suit - |Jp to 24 Months to Pay I 

Castleman Pontiac 



* 

• 
• 



1722 MADISON AVE 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 



••■■ 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky* 



Thursday, February 2, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION m%T 



Classified advertising rate is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash in advance. 

FOR SALE— 5-rm. house, lot, Beaver 
ILick, short distance from Highway 
42; bus service to city every hour; 
school bus at door; convenient to 
«churches, grocery; electricity; wa- 
-ter in kitchen; screens, storm sash. 
Henry B. Sleet. 2t-5* 



FOR . SALE— Custom Aire oil heat 
ing stove, 40,000 B. T. U. Phoenix' 



"Hotel, Walton, Ky. 



2t-4" 



YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger; Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. tf-46 

FOR SALE— Sorrel horse, 7 years old, 
1400 lbs. "Robert Deatherage, Ken- 
ton Station, Kenton, Ky. * 2t-5* 

FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
First class work, guaranteed, good 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf-2 

FOR SALE — 1941 1%-ton Dodge 
truck, '46 motor, metal covered 
body, 8.25 tires, 2-speed axle, and 
booster brakes; a real bargain. 
Harold Menke, Phoenix Hotel, 
Walton. Phone 29.- 2t-4* 



FOR SALE — KentOn county farm, 
close in, good dairy or tobacco 
land, in bluegrass; house, barn. 
Owner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, 
Ky. 4t-5» 

FOR SALE: — Warm Morning stoves. 
Call Walton 774. Priced $20 each. 

4t-4* 

WASTED TO BUY— Several 1000 ft. 
of Ash, Oak and Walnut lumber 
in the tree. Call Florence 419. 

tf-50 

FOR SALE— One White gilt, weigh 
about 250 lbs., to farrow March 11. 
T. A. Watson, Florence, Route 2. 
Phone Florence 41Q. lt-5* 



FOR SALE — First, second and third 
cutting of alfalfa, baled; timothy 
and clover; also timothy and clov- 
er, mixed. McBee Bros., Williams- 
town. Phone Williamstown 4192 
or 4073. ^8t-4* 

FOR SALE — Gray mare, 9 years old; 
hay loader; iron -wheel wagon; 
hay frame; wagon bed; mowing 
machine; corn drill; No. 20 Oliver 
chill plow; 5-shovel cultivator; 
Farmmaster milker, 2 single units; 
doubletrees, singletrees, neckyoke ; 
1932 Desoto coach. Robert Hoff- 
man, Green Road, Walton. 2t-5* 



NOTICE— We are now getting plenty 
of Sunday Enquirers; you do not 
have to take the daily paper to 
get Sunday delivery. Phone Wal- 
ton 66. . 2t-5* 

FOR SALE — Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn-, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. tf-1 

FOR SALE — Good work mare, 8 years 
old, good worker. Levi Penning- 
ton. Phone Walton 742. 2t-5* 



FOR SALE or TRADE— Bay walking 
mare, sound and gentle, for small 
pony or cattle. Dawson E. High- 
tower, Walton, Route 1. Phone 
Ind. 7284. 2t-4» 

SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
WCE— A1F nationally advertised 
sewing (machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing (Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf-1 



COVINGTON 

Ef-Ko ARMY Store 

5th and MADISON 

FOR MORE THAN 

27 Years 

WE'VE ALWAYS SOLD 

Good 

Work 

Shoes 

We fit small feet large feet 
narrow feet wide feet I 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

STORE 

508 MADISON AVENUE 
COVINGTON 



FOR SALE— All kinds of Oak Lum- 
ber, fencing planks. All types of 
dressed lumber. Stevens Lumber 
dealer, Phone Florence 419. tf-50 



FOR SALE — 5-burner oil cook stove, 
heavy porcelain, and used wash- 
ing machine, in good condition, 
reasonably priced. Phone Walton 
524. lt-5* 



Hamilton & Jones 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



Invites You to Shop! 




SPECIALS! 

5.00 



Ladies' Better Dresses $ 

Prices slashed - Orig.'$8.15 and Up 

# See these Bargains ♦ 

Ladies' Suede Shoes $ 

Black and Brown ■ Orig. 2.95 and 3.95 

Other Suedes reduced to $2.99 

Men's Wool Sweaters . 1 .98-2.98 



1.99 



No Exchanges 



All Sales Final 



SPRING PRINTS— cloth of gold 49c yd. 

PLAIN BROADCLOTH— assorted colors ...... 49c yd. 

UNBLEACHED MUSLIN 35c yd. 

WHITE INDIAN HEAD— ideal for pillowcases 79c yd. 

LADIES' NEW SPRING BLOUSES $1.39 - $3.50 - $3.98 

GIRLS' POLO SHIRTS— sizes 4 to 14 $1.10 - $1.39 

LITTLE BOYS' POLO SHIRTS— sizes 1 to 8 _„_.!: 98c 

"ALL PURPOSE" CHANEL SCARF ._... : $1.10 

PURE SILK HEADSCARFS . ... J. . .: ... $L49 



da 



• •••• 



CONRAD HARDWARE! 




—$269.50— 



Tobacco Seed — all kinds 

Tobacco Canvas — 3-A grade 

Massey-Harris Tobacco Setter 

Judson 8-ft. Lime Spreader 

Little Giant Trailer Lime Spreader „ 

John Blue Fertilizer Drill .._.. 

8-gal. Electrically Heated Jamesway 1 

4-ft. Fedeer on Legs 

Speed Queen Washer, used 2 weeks 

Maytag Washers „„ $124.95 - 

Perfection Electric Range, installed 



$1.50 oz. 

$10.50 

....... $195.00 

...... $200.00 

$69.50 

$29.00 

$10.80 

, $6.00 

....... $60.00 

.95 - $179.95 
$299.00 



9x12, 12x12, 12x15 

Linoleum Rugs 

Window Shades 65c 

Gibson Electric Range 

installed .. $239.00 

^•h. p. Elec. Motor $13.50 
Y 2 h. p. Elec. Motor $22.50 
Vz-in. Elec. Drill $34.95 

Lawn Rollers $14.50 

Enterprise 

Lard Press $29.75 

National Double Jack 

Fence Stretcher _ $44.50 
Single Jack Fence 

Stretcher : $14.50 

Double Jack with 

Wood Clamp $31.50 
Put Your Nameplate 

On Mailbox $1.00 

Bicycle Speedometer $4.95 
Decorated Pitcher and 

Six Glasses $1.29 

Bake All 1 -burner 

Oven $5.75 

Rag Rugs $1.69 

Team Harness $90.00 

All Size Collars ... $4.50 up 
Bridles $4.50,. $5.00, $7.50 
Check Lines $6.00 up 




—$74.50— 



for Service 



Large or Small 



See Powers 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES OF HOUSEHOLD 
APPLIANCES 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKV 



BABY CHICKS— Ohio U. S. Approved, 
Pullorum Controlled. Chicks hatch- 
ing every Sunday, Monday and 
Thursday. Plenty of chicks on 
hand at all times. Open day and 
night. New Hampshires, Barred & 
White Rocks, $11.90 per 100. AH 
pullets, $13.90; cockerels, $12.90. 
S. C. White Leghorns, $11.90 per 
100; pullets, $24.50; cockerels, 
$3.90. Buff, White, Black Minorcas, 
Austra Whites, $12.90, 100; pullets, 
$26.00; cockerels, $4.00. S. C. Reds, 
Buff Rocks, (Buff Orphingtons, and 
White Wyandottes, $12.90, 100; 
pullets, $14.40; cockerels, $13.90. 
White and Black Giants, Light 
Brahmas, $13.95, 100; heavy mix- 
ed, all heavy breeds, $10.50. White 
Pekin Ducklings, $30.00 per 100. 
Order your turkey poults now, for 
delivery any time after March 15, 
at $89.00 per 100. Turkeys and 
Ducks hatching on Sundays only. 
We carry a full line of poultry sup- 
plies, feeders and founts, poultry 
remedies, feed and thermometers. 
Drive to this modem hatchery and 
see these exceptional bargains. 
Visitors welcome. Jhone Jackson 
9354. Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, Win- 
ton and McKelvey Roads, Mt. 
Healthy, Ohio. lt-5 

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — It works, 
it ipays, it gets calves. Sign up in 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay- 
lor, Walton 582. tf-45 

■■-? ' — — ■ 

FOR THE BEST in Electric wiring- 
Call John T. Campbell, Walton 157. 
Trouble calls day, or night. 4t-5* 

FOR SALE — Looking for appliances, 
such as . Refrigerators, Washers, 
Deep Freeze, Heaters, Radios, used 
or new, call Independence 6585. 
Myron Stephens. • 40t-47* 



FOR SALE— 1939 Chevrolet 4-door 
excellent condition, 4 new tires, 
$395.00 for quick sale; will take 
trade-in. Phone Ind. 6737. 2t-4 



U. S. SURPLUS, two and four buckle 
cloth artics, used, $1.98. Henry's 
Bootery, Erlanger. Dixie' 8034. 

lt-5 



INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers It's 
members life insurance, auto and 
truck insurance (largest in Ken- 
tucky),, fire and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tf-2 



FOR SALE or TRADE— Team horses 
and harness, for cattle or sheep. 
Ira W. Stephenson, Nicholson and 
Walton Highway. Phone Ind. 
6742. 2t-4* 



WANTED — Housekeeper, woman 25 
to 35 years old. Phone Walton 
352. 2t-5 



Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued on Page 5) 

'FOR SALE^Registered Angus bull, 
18 months old. Call Walton "276. 
R. L. Slayback, Walton.' 2t-5 

WANTED— Good grade or registered 
Holstein cows, yearlings and heif- 
er calves; dehorned stock preferred 
and subject to rigid veterinary ex- 
amination and blood test. Address 
Box 419, Latonia Sta., Covington, 
Ky. Phone Ind. 6882 evenings, tjf-3 

SILOS — Ere^pt a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if ordered 
now! For prices and information, 
call A. «. Kwozalla, Erlanger, Ky., 
Route 4. Phone Florence 593. tf-49 



FOR RENT— Power Chain Saws with 
one man $3.50 per hour. Phone 
'Florence 419. r- ~ 



FOR SAiLE— Baled Soybean hay; get 
this^hay while it lasts, $30 deliver-' ' 

ed; cheaper if you go ge£,it. H; 

old Menke. Phone Walton 29. 



usEn niwr 



■jm^mm®i»»**&m~«*«^! 



1946 Chevrolet 4-Door 
1941 Pontiac 2-Door 
1 940 Mercury 5-pass. Cpe. 
1939 Pontiac 4-Door 
1938 Chevrolet T-Door 
1938 Chevrolet 4-Door 
1937 Chevrolet Coupe 



1 947 Chevrolet Aero Sed. 

USED TRUCKS 

1 939 White 21/2-ton Dump 
1 939 Chev. 1 y 2 Aon Dump 
1946G. M. C. 2-ton 

1948 Chev. 161" 2-ton 



-Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 



Kenton Co. Motors 






"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer* 



INDEPENDENCE, KY. IE I D. £ 



* 



Ajr*. 






% Also Cooking, 

~~V Water Heating 
* *~ ' and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, KY. 











*_2«i 






WALT 








• 






— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY — BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Adva 



nee 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1950 




Twelve Boone-co 
Delegates Attend 
Farm-Home Wee| 

Farm and Home Week for 1950 
added many thoughts to the minds 
of the 12 delegates from Boone co- 
unty attending the meetings In Lex- 
ington, last week. Much of the in- 
formation gained by the delegates 
will ibe shared with the clubs dur- 
ing the month. 

The program was started each day 
with a grand community sing, led 
by Miss Mildred Lewis, Department 
of Music, University of Kentucky. 
Miss Myrtle Weldon of the College 
of Agriculture and Home Economics, 
greeted the delegates and gave in- 
formation which /would make the 
visit more enjoyable. Her message 
Tuesday morning was,. "Let's Make 
the Most of It." 

Charles P. Taylor, Educational Di- 
rector, American Cancer Society, 
Louisville, gave a very realistic and 
understandable, talk on what we as 
individuals can do to defeat cancer. 

"Every Woman Can Be Beautiful," 
by Miss Mary Stuyvesant, certainly 
held the audience spellbound. Dr. 
Regina Escott sent forth many ideas 
for community action. Mrs. James 
Wyker, from the Ohio Council of 
Churches, added much to the week's 
program under the topic, "The Ru- 
ral Home, America's Bulwark." Food, 
fun and fellowship were enjoyed toy 
all during this inspiring week at the 
University of Kentucky. 

Boone County Homemakers were 
represented at the convention by the 
following: Mrs. Vernon Pope, Burl- 
ington; Mrs. John Kyle and Mrs. Joe 
Northcutt, Burlington Road; Mrs. 
Richard Kottmyer, Constance; Mrs. 
ROy Lutes and Mrs. Victor Benham, 
Florence; Mrs. Henry Fisher, Union; 
Mrs. John Aylor, Petersburg; Mrs. 
Matthew Flynn, Walton; Mrs. Earl 
Morehead, Taylorsport; Mrs. S. Rog- 
ers, Hebron, and Miss Namcy Mc- 
Olaskey, Home Agent. 

Several others attended the meet- 
ings just for a day, among these 
were Mrs. Petri Johnson, Mrs. Mil- 
dred Taylor, Mrs. Elmer Goodridge, 
Mrs. Gilbert Dolwick, Mrs. J. P. Dol- 
wick, Mrs. Virgil Kelly, Mrs. Dolpha 
Sebree, Mrs. Robert Moore, Mrs. 
Walter King, and Mrs. Grant Mad- 
dox. 

CLIFTON C. ROBERTS 

Clifton C, Roberts, a former office 
manager for the Carborundum Co., 
Cincinnati, for many years, died 
last Friday in St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
Covington, shortly after suffering a 
stroke at the Conner Grocery, Flor- 
ence, where he had been employed 
after resigning from the Carborun- 
dum concern because of ill health. 
He was 49 years old. 

Mr. Roberts made his home with 
a brother-in-law, M. G. Martin, in 
Florence. Other survivors include a 
niece, Miss Mary Lee Holmes," Cin- 
cinnati, and a cousin, Miss Sally 
Rogers, Lexington. 

He was a member of the Coving- 
ton Lions Club and Walton Lodge, 
No. 719, F. & A. M. 

Services were held at 2 p. m. Mon- 
day at the Chambers & Grubbs fun- 
eral home, Florence. Burial was in 
Highland Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell. 



Volume 35 — Number 6 



Engagement Announced 




Miss Dorothy Kannady 

Congratulations are being extend- 
ed to Dorothy Kannady and Elmer 
Groger on the announcement of their 
recent engagement. 

Miss Kannady is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd Kannady of Ve- 
rona, and Mr. Groger is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Groger of Wal- 
ton. 

Their forthcoming marriage will 
be an event of April 29th. 



Application For 
Corn Allotments 
Due by Feb. 15th 



Operators of farms where x no corn 
was produced in 1947, 1948 Or 1949, 
but who wish to apply for a corn 
acreage allotment for 1950 have a 
week in which to apply for these al- 
lotments, Joseph A: Huey, chairman 
of the county PMA committee an- 
nounced this week. 



Simon Kenton 
Youth Center To 
Open February 11 



On Saturday evening, February 11 
from 7:00 to 1:30, the teen-age boys 
and girls of the Simon Kenton Youth 
Center will gather at the Simon Ken- 
ton High School cafeteria for the 
festive opening of the Youth Center. 

A lively band has been engaged 
to add to the fun. There will also 
be ping-pong, checkers, jig-saw puz- 
zles and other games to help the 
youngsters spend an enjoyable eve- 
ning. 

The group will be well supervised 
by parents and friends of these 
youngsters and of the Simon Ken- 
ton P. T. A., which has made the 
Youth Center possible. 

Due will be 50 cents a year per 
person. Youngsters from 13 years 
to 22 years may become members. 
(Those who are married are in- 
eligible). | 

The Youth Center is a challenge to 
the people of the community. It's 
success depends, not upon the youth 
of the community, tout upon those to 
whom boys and girls turn for ad- 
vice, leadership and love — their par- 
ents and friends. 

If you would like to help make 
this undertaking a success, please 
write or phone Mrs. Harry Rubbe, 
Independence, Ky. Phone 5159J. 

MRS. SARAH F1NNELL 

Mrs. Sarah Crisler Finnell, a life- 
long resident of Walton, died Sun- 
day in Booth Hospital, Covington. 
She was 70 years old. 

Mrs. Finnell is survived by her 
husband, Charles Finnell; a son, 
Roland Glenn, Walton, and four 
brothers, Emerson Crisler, Coving- 
ton, Robert Crisler, Walton, Alex 
Crisler, Crittenden, and John Crisler, 
now living in Canada. 

Funeral services were held Tues- 



Engagement Announced 




Victories 15-16 Posted 
By the W-V Bearcats 



catioLl^ig^'cornTCge *aS day at 2:0 ° * m " ln «* Walton Ba P" 
cations tor 195U corn acreage allot- tist Church, with Rev. R. F. DeMoisey 

TiJSS^SS^S^^\f!SS —ted toy Rev. B. I 

Garrett. Casket bearers were Carl- 
ton Crisler, Joe Rouse, Robert De- 
Moisey, Wallace Glenn, Joe Glenn 



no production history during the 
past three years is Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1950. 

Boone county is one of 55 Kentuc- 
ky counties designated in the com- 
mercial corn area of the state, Mr. 
Huey said, and allotments will be in 
effect throughout the county. ' 

Corn growers in the county who 
have not yet reported their produc- 
tion in the years 1947-49 to the co 



Variety Quiz" at Hamilton 

The P. T, A. of Hamilton school 
unty PMA office, should do so at , j s sponsoring a "Variety Quiz," pro- 
once, Mr. Huey said. A report should !gram Thursday, February K at 7:30 



and Gilbert Glenn. Burial was in 
the Walton cemetery. 

Chambers & Grubbs funeral home, 
Walton, completed arrangements. 



an, 



\ 



Celebrates 80th Birthday ( 

D. R. Chapman of Verona Road, 
Walton, celebrated his 80th birthday 
Sunday. Those who visited the home 
were Mr. and Mrs. J. H. King/Mr. 
and Mrs. Qmer Elliston of Latonia, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chapman, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bernard Wilson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ross Chapman of Verona, (Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Crouch of Glencoe, 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Webster and 
two children of Berry, Mrs. Don 
King and daughter of Richmond, 
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Webster and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Strove 
and sons of Walton, Mr. and Mrs. 
Leo Webster of Elsmere, and Mrs. 
Lloyd Yates and daughter of Wal- 
ton. 



Truck Crops Meeting Friday 

John S. Gardner, truck crops spec- 
ialist, will meet with truck growers 
at 2:00 p. m., Friday, February 10 at 
•the Courthouse in" Burlington. Mr. 
Gardner will discuss new vegetable 
vaxietiqj, disease control and new 
cultural ©radices. 1 '- This is the'reg- 
ular annual spring meeting of truck 
plan the truck crops pro- 
set up demonstration 
Jihis year. Everyone inter- 
id in truck crops is invited to at- 




tend. 



be made for any farm where corn 
was produced in any one of these 
years. j 

Farmers' reports on their corn pro- 
duction for the past three years will 
be used to establish individual farm 
allotments for 1950. 



p. m. in thel school auditorium. 

A door prize will be given, and 
each contestant will receive a, prize. 
There are over fifty donors. There 
is to be fun fpr all — large and small. 
You are invited to attend. Admis- 
sion is 15 anq 35 cents. 



County Historical Society 
Proposed; Meet Feb. 17th 



What do you know about Boone 
County? Do you know when it be- 
came a county? Do you know that 
it was once a part of Campbell Co- 
unty and that its earliest records are 
in the Court House at Alexandria? 
Did you know that the location otf 
the state capitol in Boone County 
was once considered? Do you know 
how the first settlers came into 
Boone County, and where they came 
from? Did you know that the 
streams of Boone County have been 
panned for gold? Can you picture 
the county when prehistoric animals 



feed and water his stock without 
getting out of bed on a cold morn- 
ing. Do you know that a man in 
Boone County erected his own mon- 
ument before he died? Do you 
know why Florence is called String- 
town -on -the -Pike? Do you know 
why the railroad runs through Erl- 
anger instead of Florence? Do you 
know that about 1840 most of the 
squirrels in Boone County migrated 
into Ohio? Did Indians live in 
Boone County or Just use it as a 
hunting ground? Was there any 
fighting in Boone County during the 



lived here? Do you know about the S! vil „ K Wa , r? , ^ W Dan , iel ? oone „! d11 
bones of these animals found at Bkr J» te b " ln B T °° ne County? Were 

he and Simon Kenton ever in Boone 



bones of these animals found at Big 
Bone? Did the glaciers come into 
BooiieCounty? Do you know why 
Florence is not called Connersville 
as once named ? Do you know that a 
family once >lrved in a tree in the 
cpunty? It is reported that General 
Lafayette once spent the night "in 
the county and~i**tJ3he fifty-cent 
coin with which he paid for his 
lodging, meals and care for his horse 
is still in the county. . Do you know 
when the Burlington Court House 
was built? Do you know of the fa- 
mous omen and women Boone County 
has produced? Do you know of the 
clock invented by a Boone Countian? 
It tells much more than the time of 
day and it is still in operation in the 
county. The same inventor mech- 
anized his farm so that he could 



County? Do you know that grave 
robbers once operated here ? Do you 
know that one Boone Countian 
caught a horse-thief a and literally 
"nailed his hide" to the side of his 
barn? Did the "underground rail- 
road" operate in 'Boone County? 

Whenever a few of the older res- 
idents get together tales are told of 
happenings In the pasE. Sometimes 
fact is flavored with fiction. As the 
years go by these tales are lost to 
the coming generations and unless 
some effort is made to preserve: 
them the history of the county will 
be lost. Family burying grounds are 
a valuable link between the past 
and the present and their inscrip- 
(Continued on Page 6) 



. Miss Cordelia Leathers 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Webster of 
Verona, announced the engagement 
of their daughter, Miss Cordelia 
Leathers, to Mr. William Howard 
Thie, son of Mr. and Mrs. WiLliam 
F. Thie. 

Miss Leathers, a graduate of the 
Good Samaritan Hospital School of 
Nursing, is now an associate of the 
hospital staff. Mr. Thie served with 
the Navy in the Pacific Theatre in 
World War II. 

The wedding will take place May 
13th at the Westwood Methodist 
Church, followed toy a wedding re- 
ception at the Clovernook Country 
Club. 

Miss Leathers graduated from the 
Walton -Verona High School in 1946. 

EDWARD FELDHAUS 

Services were held at 11 a. m., 
Tuesday in the Taliaferro funeral 
koine, Erlanger, for Edward (Ted) 
Feldhaus, employee of ihe Kenton 
County Road Department for 25 
years. Burial was in the Union 
cemetery. 

Mr. Feldhaus, who was 51, died 
Saturday at his home in Union. He 
formerly resided in Elsmere. 

He leaves his widow, Mrs. Maude 
Feldhaus; a daughter, Mrs. Helen 
Gatewood, Union; two sisters, Mrs. 
Charles Hedges, Union, and Mrs. 
Ray Newman; six brothers, William 
Feldhaus, Covington, Howard Feld- 
haus, Walton, Robert Feldhaus, Els- 
mere, Joseph Feldhaus, Ludlow, 
James Feldhaus, Bellevue, and Frank 
Feldhaus, Aurora, Ind., and one 
grandchild. 

Death was due to a cerebral hem- 
mon-hage, Mrs. Tressa Riffe, Kenton 
county coroner, said. 
i ■ 

Happy Helpers Entertained 

The Happy Helpers class of the 
Walton Methodist Church met in the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Penn 
on January 9th. Newly-elected of- 
ficers took charge of the meeting. 

The class is contemplating a busy 
year. The major '^ie at this ses- 
sion was a new rirgVor the church. 
Plans were .to have it lead toy Easter. 
Special pledges and plans were made 
to this fund. 

The next meeting of the class will 
be held in the home of Miss Louise 
Conrad, February 14th. 

The following guests and mem- 
bers were present in January: Mr. 
and Mrs. William Brown, Miss Lou- 
ise Conrad, Mrs. Florence Newton, 
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Roberts a"nd dau- 
ghter, Malcolm Simpson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Stephenson, V. D. James, 
Rev. George Hoffman, Mrs. Lavonia 
Elliott, Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Carlisle, 
Miss Emma Jane Miller, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clifford Pruett, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Roberts, and the host and 
hostess and their children. 



Training Class February 16 

On Thursday, February 16th in 
Florence at the new Fire House, the 
Foods Class will be given for lead- 
ers from Boone County Homemakers 
Clubs. Mrs. Pearl Haak, Food Spec- 
ialist from the University of Ken- 
tucky, will give the lesson, which 
will consist of meal planning and 
social hour, refreshments for any oc- 
casion. 

Club presidents are to send two 
leaders from their club. Let's set 
our goal at one hundred per cent; 
each member of your club doing at 
least one thing out of each lesson, 
and every member trying at least 
one new recipe. 

Leaders don't forget the hour is 
10.0Q a. m.— Pub. Chm. 



Special Mission 
Services to Be Held 
At Baptist Church 



According to Rev. B. C. Garrett,, 
pastor of the Walton Baptist Church, 
a special .series of services, known as 
"The School of Missions" will be 
held at the church, February 12th 
through February 17th. 

Sunday night, Rev. Harold Hall, a 
Missionary who served dn Yangchow 
and Chinkiang, China, will speak at 
the evening service. At the con- 
clusion of this service, the Ordinance 
of Baptism will be administered, 



Burlington Friday; 
Hebron on Tuesday 



The Walton-Verona Bearcats post- 
ed victories fifteen and sixteen the 
past week when they disposed of 
St. Henry (58-49) last Friday night 
at Erlanger, and Warsaw, for the 
second time (57-49) Tuesday night 
at the losers' gym. The Cats have 
lost three games. 

The Crusaders, last Friday night, 
showed unexpected strength and it 
was a ball game all the way. How- 
ever, the locals were on top through- 
out, quarter scores being: First, 19- 
12; second, 30-26; third, 40-37, and 
the final, 58-49. 

Dike Vest was again top scorer - 
for the Bearcats, with 18 markers. 
Second was Johnny Maddox with 
14 points, and Tommy Johnson and 
Layne Cheeseman had 11 each. 

In the second team contest, the 
St. Henry reserves eked out a one- 
point (37-36) victory over -Walton. 

The locals ran into stiffer opposi- 
tion Tuesday at Warsaw than was 
had here last week. At least a part 
of this added strength was due to 
the return of Coomer to the Gallatin 
County line-up. 

In the first quarter Walton took 
a 13-point lead and were never 
headed by the home team, the count 
being 21-8. At the half, the score 
was 33-21, at the third period, 45-32, 
and the final, 57-49. 

Vest and Ronnie Cteek divided 
scorning honors for Walton, with 12 



Monday night, Rev. Richard Bry- ,. 
ant, who is doing city and rural work ^LTt'f^ neXt came . Johnson ' 
in the state of Illinois, will be the'^ ox and Cheeseman with eight 
speaker. m ^^ a f iec _ e - Beach was top man 



for Gallatin County, with 16 tallies 

and Coomer was next with 11 points. 

In the preliminary fray, tlw War- 



Tuesday night, Rev. W. C. Har- 
rell, a Mountain Missionary, will be 
the speaker. 

Wednesday night, Rev. Robert EHTE W ° n ,* n easy 3 411 «>"" 
Connely, who served in the South test from the Walton reser ves. 
Pacific, will .be the speaker. I Burlington and Hebron Next 

Thursday night, Rev. Earl Parker, | The TOmi week m ft 

l^T^lf*™ fOT » »H greats taking part in^two^oone 

Cunty Conference tussles. On Fri- 



will-toe the speaker. 



Friday night, Rev. H. D. Standifer, 



day night of this week they go to 



who has been doing Associational Burlineton and i 



the speaker. 

A cordial invitation is extended to 
all to attend and hear these men, 
who have had a rioh experience in 
Mission work. Services will begin 
nightly at 7:30. 



Walton PTA To 
Hold Important 
Meeting Friday 



Union O. E. S. to Meet 

Union Star Chapter, No. 461, O. E. 
S., will hold their stated meeting on 
Thursday, Feb. 9th at 8 p. m. in the 
Boone Union Lodge, Union, Ky. 
There will be extensive ceremonies 
and balloting. * 

-The ways and meanS committee of 
Union Star Chapter arejjponsoring a 
jeans and gingham social , Friday, 
February 17 at the Florence Civic 
Building, Florence, Ky. There will 
be lots of fun for everyone and prizes 
by the score.— Pub. Ohm. 
I — _____ ________ 

Hopewell Circle to Meet 

The Gladys Hopewell Circle of the 
Walton BaptisfChurch will meet on 
Thursday, February 9th at the home 
of Eloise Breeden. The time is 7:30. 
Each. member is to bring a 25c gift 
and a Valentine. The Y. W. A. is 
jnvited to attend this meeting. 



The next meeting of the Walton 
Parent-Teachers Association will be 
held Friday, February' 17 at 3 p. m. 
at the school. Don't forget the date 
or you will miss an enjoyable after 
noon. The organization is celebrat 
ing Founders Day and the program 
committee Is planning an interest- 
ing program, after which refresh- 
ments will be served. 

The program will be presented by 
members of the PTA and children 
from the first four grades. A brief 
history of the founders will be given 
by an adult and several children. 

A short pageant, "P. T. A. Corner- 
stones," will be presented by six 
members and the president^ eohg, 
"My Tribute"; reading, "In Apprec- 
iation of P. T. A." In addition to 
the above, several children will have 
a few short parts. 

A short business session will be 
held and the P. T. A. has some very 
important busi ness t o be discussed 
and the school NEEDS YOUR 4ssist- 
ance in taking care of this business. 
So please be present, f«c in' Working 
for the gqhool, you aid your chil- 
dren arid yourself. 

A special invitation is extended 
to the citizens who have recently 
moved to Walton. If you feel you 
are a stranger in town, attend the 
PTA meetings and you'll soon get 
acquainted and be a stranger no 
more. ^ ' 

Dont forget the date-=-F_ 
February 17th at 3:00 p. hi, 

It is expected that 800,000 bushels 
of corn in Henderson county will be 



The final three games of the sea- 
son will be played at home, against 
Florence (Feb. 17), Crittenden (Feb. 
21), and New Haven (Feb. 24). 

Agricultural Planning Meets 

The annual agricultural commun- 
ity planning meetings in the follow- 
ing communities have been set for 
the coming week, according to Bill 
Davis, County Agent: 

Constance, 8:00 p. m., February 14 
at the schoolhouse. 

Walton, 8:00 p. m., February 15 at 
the schoolhouse. 

Florence, 8:00 p. m., February 16, 
at the schoolhouse. 

Hamilton, 8:00 p. m„ February 17, 
at the schoolhouse. 

Verona, 2:00 p. m., February 18, at 
the schoolhouse. 

Large Auction Scheduled 

' Rel C. Wayman & Sons, real estate 
and auction brokers, have one of 
their unusually large sales sched- 
uled for Saturday, February 18th at 
Morning View, starting at 10:00 a. m. 
To be sold is an 87-acre tractor famm 
with two good homes, Guernsey 
cows, heifers, tools and equipment. 
Mrs. Katherine Maloney Dwyer, the 
owner, has purchased a home in the 
city and is selling out-nhook, line 
and sinker— at absolute auction. A 
feature attraction, a fat pig (at the 
opening) and a television set (at the 
closing) of the sale, will be given 
away. For more details see ad in 
this issue. 



Walton Homemakers, to Meet 

The^Walton Homemakers are to 
meet wjth Mrs. William Breeden, Jjr, 
on Friday, Webfuary 10th. JThe sec- 
ond lesson bn Trimming Hats will 
be given. Each member Is request- 
ed to bring an article for a silent 
auction sale, such as fancy 
craft work, dolls, vases or , 
have-you, which someone I 
•like to have. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Clee^and 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Q. Carlisle were the 
sealed under the government price Saturday night guests of Mr. and 
support plan. I Mrs. Sam Hudson and son. 




I 



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Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 






WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) , 



Entered as Second Class Matter 

January 1, 1916 at the Post 

Office at Walton, Ky. 



Mark M. Meadows 
Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

$1.50 PER YEAR_ 
(In Advance) 



MEMBER 



Verona 



KENTUCKY PRES! 
'AS SOCIATION , 

OICANIllD 1AHUAHY. Ittl 



Urtcle Earnest Porter is about the 
same. Perhaps a little better at this 
writing. 

Mrs. Lizzie Noel was in town' three 
days last week taking treatments. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Renaker vis- 
ited relatives in Covington and Crit- 
tenden, Sunday afternoon. 

Rev. John Ashcraft is still quite 
ill at his home. 

.Mrs. Pearl Lamn was visiting her 
daughter and family in Erlanger, 
and consulting Dr. Ridder in Cin- 
cinnati, last week. Her grandson, 
Fred Riffet, returned home with her 
and on Sunday they attended church 
at South Fork and had dinner at the 
John Lamn home and Freddie re- 
turned home on Sunday with Misses 
Lana and Blanche Lamn, who work 
in Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Kannady visit- 
ed on Sunday their son, Bert, and 
family near Taylor Mill Road. 

Word has been received f rom Billie 

Mac Waller* that he lias had his ton- 

| sils out and is doing nicely since his 

'return to school after a vacation at 

home ibetween semesters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Florence and 
daughters were visiting in this com- 
munity last week. 

Mrs. Connie Webster was calling 
on Mrs. Pattie Waller, Friday morn- 
ing. 



Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Lamn entertain- 
ed on Saturday evening, Marion Arch 
Waller and Freddie Riffet for a rook 
party. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chapman were 
visiting the dentist Thursday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. Perry Dean of the Lock Road 
Homemakers Club in Carroll county 
has made 20 slipcovers for herself 
and friends. 

It is predicted that dairying in 
Monroe county will rank recond to 
tobacco in farmers' income by the 
end of the year. 

Homemakers in Henry county wir- 
ed 275 lamps for electricity, after 
learning the method in their home- 
makers clubs. 



Uncle Sam Says 



Dirt for Dough 

Kenton-co. Specials 



-NEW LISTINGS- 



200 ACRES — Good 5-room home, feed and dairy barn; on Moffett 
Road; stock and tools; Mr. and Mrs. Ben Harvey, owners; $11,500. 

98 ACRES — 7-room home, modem feed and dairy barn; Byrd Road; 
Mr. and Mrs. George Ballinger, owners; $14,500. 

200 ACRES — 5-room home, large feed and dairy barn; 2.4 acres to- 
bacco base; just 1 mile from LLL Highway on Rich Road. Own- 
ers, Magee Bros.;. $12,500. 

80 ACRES — 5-room home, good tobacco barn, good feed and dairy 
barn, many outbuildings; located on Decoursey Pike near Ken- 
ton; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Casey, owners; $14,000. 

REL C. WAYMAN & SONS 

Real Estate and Auction Brokers 
623 WASHINGTON STREET COVINGTON, KY. 

HEmlock 5107; Independence 5064; Evenings, JUniper 4895 



You Go to Bed 

TO SLEEP 

-NOT TO FRET 




Ever no tioe how small 
troubles look big to you 
and greater trouble* 
••em crashing whan 
narrous tension keep* 
jrou awaka at night? 
Too can't bs at year 
best mentally or phys- 
fcally unless you get 
sufficient sleep. 

Miles rVerain* naa 
helped thousands to 
mora restful nights and 
mora peaceful days. 
Ask your druggist for 
Mllea Nervine. CAU- 
TION— um only as di- 
rected. Effervescent 
tablet*. 36c and 75c 
-Liquid, 25c and $1.00. 
Miles Laboratories, 



AUCTION 

Due to the death of my husband, we are dissolving our partnership of Stock, Tools, 



Feed and Furniture 



South End of Independence, Ky. 



ON THE LLL HIGHWAY 



Sat., Feb. 1 1 



9:30 
a. 



45— HEAD OF LIVESTOCK^-45 " 

10 head of Holstein cows, all young; 10 Guernsey & Jersey cows; this is a fine herd 
of dairy cows; 8 fresh, others to be fresh soon. Four Holstein heifers, bred; 9 year- 
ling Holstein & Jersey heifers. Two broodsows, weigh about 400 lbs. ; 8 gilts, about 
250 lbs. ; boar, about 250 lbs., all O. I. C; scalding pan; riding mare. 
International tractor, model C, 2-way plow, disc harrow, mower, 2-row cultivator, 
lime spreader, power take-off, all International tools, almost new ; manure spreader, 
cultipacker; horse tools — riding cultivator, section harrow, John Deere mower, hay 
rake, iron-Wheel wagon, box and hay bed. 4-can milk cooler, 2-oinit milker, 8 ten- 
gallon milk cans, vat ; all kinds of Small farming toos, everything you need. 
About 40 tons alfalfa hay, baled; 200 bales straw; 300 bushels corn ; 125bu. wheat. 
Six rooms o{ furniture — some of this is antique; 2 two-piece living room suites, 
black walnut; 5-piece bed room suite; chairs; heating stove; cook stove; large 
refrigerator; furniture of all kinds; 20 bushels potatoes; 1 bushel gladioli bulbs; la 
rge amount of canned fruit. This is one ofthe largest sales to be held in this section 
for a long time — come early — sale starts at 9 : 30 a. m. sharp; co wsale starts at 1 : 30. 

—LUNCH ON GROUNDS— 

Farm of 1 35 acres, one of the best irrNorthern Kentucky, for sale privately — see 
the owner or agent. 

Allie Allnutt & Mrs. M. C. Co 

Sale Conducted By 

HARRY F. JOHNSON 

Real Estate and Auction Broker 
JOHNSON, ELLIOTT & TANNER, Auctioneers / fCARL JUSTICE, Clerk 



V 




Here's a good 1950 resolution: "I will 
start today taking advantage of the safe, 
sure way of saving by purchasing U. S. 
Savings Bonds. That is one habit I will 
adhere to, come what may." Start the 
new half of the 20th Century rijrht by 
enrolling for the Payroll Savings Plan 
where you work or, if self-employed, 
the Bond-A-Month Plan where you 
bank. In ten short years, 1960 to be ex- 
act, you will reap the harvest of $4 for 
every $3 invested today. Your future 
will be secure with U.S. Savings Bonds. 

U. S. Treasury Department 



In Jefferson county, home 
increased the number of clut 
43 with 808 members, to 53 
with 1,055 members. 



During December, a load of 30 high 
grade Guernsey heifers was distrib- 
uted throughout Meade county In 
lots of two or three. — 

Ladino clover was seeded in mix- 
tures by 582 farmers in Montgomery 
county last year. 



About 450 members of 4-H clubs in 
Oldham county inspected the fi. F. 
Avery & Sons plant in, Louisville as 
a part of their annual achievement 
day program. 

Dairy products sold in Rockcastle 
county last year totaled $380,181. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

UAWTTV? CORP. 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



CALVIN CRESS 

OUR FARMALL MAN , SAY'S : 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Resyts! 



EXTERIOR & INTERIOR i 

PAINTING 

Paper Hangii 

Also Steaming Off Wallpcr,>er 




LUKE BROS. 

Phone: JUniper 4084 
or Independence 6329 



« 



COVINGTON 

Ef-Ko ARMY Store 

5th and MADISON 

FOR MORE THAN 



27 Y 



ears 

WE'VE ALWAYS SOLD 

Good 

Work 

Shoes 

We fit small feet, large feet, 
narrow feet wide feet I 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

STORE 

508 MADISON AVENUE 
COVINGTON 



DIAMOND 
VALUE . . . 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds axe 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and 
admiration. 



Come to Motch's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced in strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
ence in this one loca- 
tion is your assurance 
of getting dollar for 
dollar value. In your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 
Monthly Payments I 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



FARMALL-TlME-PROVep FOR. IMPROVED FARMlNfr 



CALVIN CRESS & SONS 

BUjRLINGTON, KY. PHONE 79 




Maytag! $24.95 

For Your Old Washer, Regardless of Make or Condition 
No Down Payment — 1 Year to Pay 

Ofcourseyoucan 
afford a /Haytaq/ 





Now — a genuine Maytag at these easy-on-the-budget prices! 
Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
faction with the rugged, dependable Maytag! 

Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
onstration. . ' • ' • 





THE MAYTAG CHIEFTAIN. A gen- 
ulne Maytag, yat priced within a 
fewdollaraoftheloweat- MA a ae 
eoat waahara on the VI /A" 
market. I-»"V— 



THI MAYTAG COMMANDER 
Bit, equate porcelain tab. Gym- 
foam aatlon waehea 
extra faat, extra *|44_ 



HAGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 






I 



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-** 



I 
I 

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»t 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 




WALTON ADVERTISER, \ftJton, Kentucky 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
- Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 
Bryan Rectdr, SUpt. 

Sunday School __1 i 0: oo a. m. 

Morning Worship ii:00 a. m 

B- T. U. , 6:30 _ 

Evening Worship 7;3o p v m . 

WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Fred S. Nichols, Pastor 

Frank Penlck, Sunt. 

Sunday School i 0:0 a. m. 

Morning Worship n.oo a. m 

Evening Worship 7 : 3o p . m . 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 

Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School 1O:00 a . m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship _ 6-45 p m 

Evening Worship 7-30 f>' m ' 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p! m.' 

ST. PATRICK CHURCH, VERONA 
Rev. Henry A. Busameyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a m 
2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m 
3rd Sunday of month .__ 8:30 a m 
4th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m' 
5th Sunday of month 8r30 a. m. 

ALL SAINTS MISSION, WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m 

2nd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m 

4th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 

J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. __'__ 7:30 p. m. 



13 



SCRIPTURE: Acta 13:2-14-28. 
DEVOTIONAL READING: Isaiah 49:Bb. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(First and Third Sundays £ 

FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
. .-. Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 'a. m. 

Young People — 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Christian -Endeavor 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship "7:30 p. m. 



Gospel Goes West 

Lesson for February 12, 1950 




KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School _„ io : oo a. m. 

Morning Worship n : oo a. m 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m! 

Prayer Meeting Wed 8:00 p. m. 

Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 

—Services Every Sunday— 

INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CR 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship n : oo a. m 

Evening Worship 8:00 p m 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m.' 

NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School io.oo a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7 : oo p. m . 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m 

BJble Study Wed _. 8:00 p. m 

L_ 

CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Walter Kidwell, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a . m. 

Evening Service _ 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 

CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. SUpt.— Harvey Hughes 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Don SmdAh, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. in. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 
Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m, 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m. 



LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev v Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 

BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School .__ 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Services ,__ 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U ., 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services ; 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 
• NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Ray 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



♦' 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



SAFETY 

op to '500q 



■^ 



FIRST FEDERAL ffl 

501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINGTON, KY. 



SAVINGS and 

ASSN. 



CO YOU DON'T BELIEVE in 
18 foreign missions? Then you 
can't read the New Testament with 
any comfort. Every book in it was 
written either by a missionary, or 
about missionaries, or to»mission- 
aries, o'r to be used in mission work. 
Chapters 13 and 14 . 
of Acts tell us i 
about the first or- 
ganized foreign 
mission project in 
the history of the 
Christian church. 
It is the story of 
how the Gospel 
was taken out of 
the narrow strip 
of coastland along Dr - Foreman 
the eastern shore of the Mediter- 
ranean, where it was born, out into 
the western world. 

* • • 
The Best They Had 

THE FIRST missionary party 
1 were not raw untried men. 
They were Barnabas and Saul, the 
top leaders of Antioch. These men 
had done a great work in Antioch; 
their usefulness there was not at 
an end by any means. -i But the 
church sent them away to win 
souls elsewhere. It is a mistake to 
suppose that just anybody will do 
as a missionary. 

Ignorant people who suppose 
that missionaries are only the 
"culls" of the church don't 
know the facts. A few years 
ago a scientist, Ellsworth Hunt- 
ington, made a study of the 
graduates of Yale and Harvard 
who were successful enough to 
be written up in "Who's Who 
in America." He found that 
missionaries' sons furnished the 
largest proportion of those suc- 
cessful men. • 

The reason for this, he believed, 
is that only in missionary families 
do you find that both parents, and 
not just one, have to go through,..a 
rigid sifting process. Only the best 
—mentally, morally? physically— 
are accepted by the church today 
as missionaries. 

• • • 

Strategic Centers 

CAUL, or Paul, who came rapid- 
•^ ly to the front in the mission- 
ary team, was all for efficiency. 
He never did a thing the hard way 
if an easier way would save hi3 en- 
ergy. So we find him heading for 
the great centers of population. 

In the synagogues he would 
find the most religions people 
in the city, people who already 
believed in the One God and 
who took seriously the Law 
and the Prophets. 

Barnabas and Saul stuck to cities 
for another reason also. Not that 
they despised smaD-town folk, but 
they knew that cities are where the 
crowds are. For every dozen poor 
. pie they could reach in a village, 
there were hundreds to be reached 
in the cities. So today, mission 
work has generally concentrated 
first in the most heavily settled 
regions. 

• • • 

The Follow-Up 

CAUL AND BARNABAS also set 
• the example for later genera- 
tions in their use of the "follow- 
up." They did « not suppose that 
simply converting people was 
enough. There had to be second 
visits. Some churches Paul vis- 
ited as many as five times. They 
would appoint officers in every 
church. They knew that organized 
religion is more likely to last than 
disorganized religion. 

They were not fly-by-night 
evangelists, leaving behind 
them only an ebbing wave of 
emotional excitement. Every 
rose grower knows that it is 
better to put a 10-cent rose in 
a 50-cent hole than to put a 
50-cent rose into a 10-cent hole. 
So Paul did not stick little, seed- 
lings of new Christians into barren 
ground at random; he took pains to 
see that they were solidly planted 
in good rose-beds. 

' •' • • 

The Holy Spirit 

•THERE IS ANOTHER, and most 
* important, way in which this 
first missionary effort has set the 
pace for all since: From beginning 
to end, they depended on the Holy 
Spirit. It was the Spirit who first 
suggested the idea; it was the 
Spirit who gave the power, and 
furnished the guidance. Not that 
the Spirit was or is • substitute 
for human effort. 

Bnt to this vary day, if you 
want to find persons who know 
about the Holy Spirit at first 
hand, who know what it means 
to depend .on the Spirit and to 
be used by Him, then get ac- 
quainted with your church's 
missionaries. 



NEW BETHEL BAPTIST. VEBONA 

Rev. R. f. DeMoisey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School i 0: oo a. m. 

Morning Worship u : oo a . m 

Evening Worship .__ 7:30 p m 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

—Services Every Sunday— 

WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
. Grover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMilllan, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morndng Worship n.-oo a. m 

B. T. U 6:45 p ] m ; 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p, m. 

INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U _,_ 7:00 p. m 

Worship 7:30 p . m 

Prayer <Bjfole Study*Wed. _ 7:30 p. m, 

STAFFORDSBURG church 

Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship :„ 7:45 p. m. 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHUBCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 

Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 a. m. 

Wbrship Service 10:30 a. m. 




Page Three 



Prices 
all can 
afford ! 



the Facilities, 
the Experience, 
and the Ability 
to give the 
Finest in funeral 
service! 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

FUNERAL HOMES 

Walton Ky. Florence, Ky. 

Phone 352 ph one 193 



1 




THE BEST PLACE 

EAT 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 



For A Rainy Day! 



Establish the habit of regular 
saving.. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as little as $1.00! 

Personal and Business Loans 1 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KY. 




DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hour.; 9:30 to 5:00. WMn.Ktay. 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 




SO£> 

The 

°f His Country 






. > 



Meet George I 

George wasn't present the night his illustrious 
namesake crossed the Delaware. Nor did he 
arrive in time to "winter" with his countrymen 
at Valley Forge. As a matter of fact, it was 
one hundred sixty-six years after Cornwallis 

^♦7.!^u ed ifit Geor * e bec *«»« an American 
citizen — by birth. 

George is old enough now to carry a flag. And 
he s old enough to carry in his heart the princi- 
ples for which that flag stands. 

One of those principles is Religious Liberty 
... the right of every American to worship and 
serve God in his own way. 

George goes to Sunday School. That's part 
of carrying the Sag. 

,u Fo » . the ""*"?£ ri JP htB and Privileges which 
the Father of His Country helped us to win, 
the son of bis country must learn to love and to 
defend. 



"« CHUBCH FOB AU 

AU FOR THE CHUHCW 

r.o»oi,« vhy £er? J° Ur """d 
P°rt th. Chu/ch ff rw y md •""• 
chlldr.ni lafa, ,,, P (z > , F <" hi» 
°< bis comrnurTiiv !i/ 0t J" **• 

vo n d.v;; Pro ^ b , t *"' j i-r 

W«dn.£VR t V. , . h «r 7 13-20 



Linton's Barber Shop 
Walton, Kentucky 




Florence Deposit Bank y 
Florence, Kentucky 



Hamilton and Jones 

Walton, Kentucky 



Conrad Hardware 

For Service, Large or Small, See Powers 



Dixie State Bank 
Walton.. Kentucky 



Consolidated Telephone Co. 
Florence. Kentucky 



Dixie Chevrolet Sales 
Phone Walton 95 



Meador's Grocery 

Home of Fine Foods, Vegetables, Meats 

"" " ... 

Walton & Readnour 
Cool - Feed - Seed Phone Walton 154 



Roberts Grocery m 
Where Tou Get Quality and Price 



Community Public Service Co., Inc. 
Walton, Kentucky * 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 




BABY CHICKS 

$13.50 per 100 

Licensed and Approved by Kentucky Department of Agriculture 



OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 
WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 
POULTRY UTTER - REMEDIES 

TUXEDO FEEDS — 

Garden Seed - Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

■ ■ • * 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 





.hWASHIHGW 



fjfflfoftyb 



This is not to say the Barkley 
honeymoon is over. But according 
to the Washington society writers, 
the Barkley household is following 
the traditional pattern of married 
couples. 

The other day, so they say, the 
Barkleys were invited to an ultra- 
swank affair, something pretty im- 
portant. And so, just like thousands 
of other wives, the new Mrs. Barkley 
is supposed to have told the Veep: 

"Tha^means I'll need money for 
a new dress f"" 

Party Problems: 

There was a minor mystery in 
Washington the other day, follow- 
ing a party at the White House. 

President and (Mrs. Truman enter- 
tained in honor of the Vice President 
and Mrs. Barkley. Sixteen guests 
were invited to dinner. The next 
night, Miss Margaret Truman en- 
tertained. And she had 18 guests. 

Reporters — not having much else 
to do — asked the White House social 
secretary how come the difference 



In numbers. And the embarrassed 
lady, after flushing deep scarlet, re- 
plied that the older folks, broad of 
beam, just have to have larger chairs 
4h,an the young fry. 
Lats of UoM: 

Do you ftpfe any idea about the 
number of Kentucky farms now 
wired for electricity? 

The figure would startle you. Ac- 
cording to the REA, about 65 per 
cent of all the farms in the Blue 
Grass State have electricity. And 
each week more rural homes are 
connected. Kentucky is just about 
average, considering the nation as a 
whole. Connecticut, which is more 
suburban than rural, is at the top of 
the list with more than 99 per cent. 
At the bottom is North Dakota and 
her wide open spaces with 36 per 
cent. 
Helpful Bills: 

Kentucky communities will be in- 
terested in several bills introduced 
the other day. 

Senator Lehman," the new Senator 



from New York, offered a bill to per- 
mit Uncle Sam to lend any commun- 
ity up to five million dollars to im- 
prove or build sewage plants. Right 
now the limit is about $250,000 and 
most communities need more than 
that to ibuild a first rate plant. 

Another bill before the House 
■would help those areas in Kentucky 
not having library facilities. Unole 
Sam would help out with an approp- 
riation of $40,000 a year for the next 
five years. ■ ; ; . 



But here is one thing to remem- 
ber. These bills have a long way to 
go before passage. And the accent 
is on economy. 
Do You Know: 

A recent visitor to Washington 
was Joseph Healy, Covington attor- 
ney . . . Chief Justice Fred Vinson 
was one of the honored guests this 
past week at the annual dinner giv- 
en by the Washington Radio Corre- 
spondents Association . . . Kentuck- 
ians are amazed at the Washington 



weather. Here is is February and not 
a drop of snow yet ... The dumping 
of 50 million bushels of potatoes has 
increased demands for a change dn 
the price support program . . . Con- 
gressional mail from Kentucky is 
heavy with demands for federal 
economy and excise tax reductions. 



Cecil Sheperson of Boyle county 
produced a third more tobacco per 
acre where Ky. 35 (formerly F17A) 
was grown than Ky. 22. 



Mrs. L. E. Martin of Hart county 
made 51 aluminum trays, after 
learning about them in her home- 
makers club. 

Fourteen 4-H clubs have been or- 
ganized in Elliott county with a 
membership of 617 boys and girls. 

Jim Bouldin of Todd county esti- 
mates that his 40-acre field of fescue 
saved him about three-fourth ton of 
hay per day for 60 days on 92 head 
of beef cows. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 
Phone HEmlock 2458 



-A 



Quality Plumbing Fixtures 
MAKE YOUR BATHROOM 
MODERN 

Truly modern, efficient homes demand 
the best in plumbing, end heating. Boy 
American-Standard Plumbing Fixtures 
and be lure of the best . . . make your bath 
and powder room distinctive, a room like 
the one shown here, that you can point to 
with pride. The superb Master Pembroke 
Beth, qoiet Master One-Piece Water 
Closet and convenient Companion Lava- 
tory assure years of lasting satisfaction. 
See these beautiful units today . . in 
lustrous white or your choice of a wide 
variety of lovely colors. 




Let Us Help You Build or Remodel . . . Get Full Details Now 

Wt also handle American-Standard Heating tariptna a fa fat.ajl fcfk** 
radJawr and warm air systems, for every sue home. We wdl be 8l»d to mspect 
jEEn&esent heating and plumbing irtstallaaons, and. he^ you plan complete 
loom modernization or replacement of single units, without cost pr °Mj«"J°o- 
TtoTcan pay for modernization out of income with our convenient finance plan. 
Complete amies and installation service. Come in . . . or call . . . «oaay. 

A. & M. SUPPLY CO. 

106 East Fourth Street Covington, Ky. 

Phone— JUniper 3500 




JOE KENNEDY'S 

GAY 90s CLUB 

DANCING THREE NIGHTS EACH WEEK . . . 

Friday, Saturday and Sunday! 



Music By 



Lee Rolph & His Kentucky Play Boys 



Square and Popular Dancing 

* "Ga yest Spot On U. S. 25" 
REFRESHMENTS! 
4 Miles South of Walton Phone Ind. 6495 



87- ACRE TRACTOR FARM 

2 6-Room 2-Story Frame Homes 

Cows, Heifers, Tools, Equipment 

At ABSOLUTE AUCTION 

a A ' . \ /. 1/ KENTON COUNTY 

MOming VieW, l\y- On Decoursey Pike, State Route 177 

Saturday, February 18 - 10 A. M. 

date-regardless of price or weather. This farm has always bee n cons^er^ ^one of the besUn ^on ^J, 
Mrs. Lawyer's late husbanibeing a very prosperous- farmer. It s close to grocery, parocniai a f 
schools, on bus line, and school bus at door. Nine-tenths acre tobacco base. 

TRACT No. 1-6-room, two-story frome hous^ built in ffi^*^ 

and feed room, 2-story chicken house, nice level garden site already fenced in. ihe house 

and double drain steel sink, Venetian blinds, new roof, and good water supply. . 

TRAC TNo 2— 6-room two-story frome home with basement, front and back porch and 2 wells; .milk ^house 

corrT crib dairylbam with 1 2 cow stanchions, large tobacco and implement barn close to house, and a fine lake 

stocked with fish; all fenced and cross fenced. 

TRACT No. 3-40 acres of level tractor land on the east side of Decoursey Pike, which runs 1 to the river; ideal 

for Vamp cottages, camp sites or it's a fine building site.Real estate to be .old promptly at 1 :00 p. m. 

The right will be reserved to group any two or all parcels . 

FARM TOOLS-Case tractor, model VC, .940 with power ^^^^W^^^^ 
with double 1 2-in. cut; Case power mower 7-ff. cut, like new; Roger MMta.Mt f^rtem*^ manure 
ing, model R, green crop and hay loader, like new, used 2 &***?¥£* J* ' ^t SoTCg; Hammer 
spreader; silage cutter, Bizzard; 30 ft. outside pipe and distributors, 6-in tracto belt, ov «• f 

mill, Sears Roebuck, like new; rubber tired farm wagon with tractor ^^^'^^"K woven 
McCormick horse mower; horse jumper plow; 3-shovel Rastas plow ■; double f o ; e ] P^; J^ B ^ tric milk . 
wire stretchers with chains; barb wire stretchers ; General Elecnc milk coloer , 2 canj * e ™* w ^^ 8train . 
Z; 1-3 h. p. motor with 1 single Rite-Way unit; McCormick .ingle > unit; 6 ^^ff^S^^' "drill 
er; 2 wash vats; 2 washing Curlator milk cooler; 2 5 5 -gallon oil drums with ^ucets 2 w he elb a rrows , 
press; about 262 pocust fence posts, V/ 2 ft.; 1800 tobacco sticks; posthole digger, p.tchforks, hoes, etc. 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS-Breakfast set, taUe ^hairs J *££*« £ ** fiE 3^ 3££ 

bureau; sewing machine; phonograph and records 9xU e™™*™*"*'^^. -gal. jar; power lawn mower, 
chine, electric; fuel oil heater, heats 4-5 rooms; 2-burner oil heater ^f^^^ Lders, all kinds, 
like new; lawn swing and chairs; oil brooder stove, brood up to 400 chicks, water fountain, ree 

FEED— 1 75 bushels of good com ; loose hay in bam, to be sold by ton. 

STOCK-79 large type English White Leghorns, young; black mare 8 years old, "^J^^™ (g 

heifers, 2 already bred; Hereford bull, 18 months old, good stock. 

-Lunch will be served on the grounds by the ladies of the St. Mary's Church- 

At the Opening Sale— A FAT PIG to be given away to the Lucky Ticket 
Holder-ALSO A TELEVISION SET - **HSj^ 

Frank Miller and the Kentucky Fiddlers of Radio Station WZIP 

Rel C. Way-man & Sons 

REAL ESTAT? & AUCTION BROKERS 
623 Wadnngton M taMi, *«***, Phone" HEmlock 5107; Ind.,»ndenc. 5064 

' Auctioneer-Cecil Wayman, JUniper 4895 Clerk «c Carfner-R. S. "Bock" Wayman. Ind. 6457 

Wu .Adk»llto Why Not Auction hi Call HEmlock 5107 Now! 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 



Due to the fire on our premises, an insurance adjustment has been made, therefore we will offer our stock, consisting of Men's, Women's, Children's Work and Dress Clothes, 
Shoes, Rubber Footwear, and Dry Goods at 

■^ni^P 1 ^ W^ tk 1^% ^^B™B fWH ^^^^^>^FW This merchandise must go regardless of our 

rnlLrS rAK Kfc_ I IW 1^1 15% loss to make room for s p rin * Go ° d *- Take 

WT-i IllVfciW, ■ ^^im Wk+mMWim^J WW %#^#^P I ■ advantage of these Tremendous Values .. . 

HURRY! HURRY! Come While our Selection is Still Complete 



13-15 DIXIE HIGHWAY 
ERLANGER, KY. 

"THE BARGAIN HOUSE" 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 



All Sales Final - No Refunds 
or Exchanges. Positively No 
Merchandise Sold to Dealers! 



l~J 



| FLORENCE 



Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Kelley of Hope 
ful Road, and Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 
Utzinger and daughters Loraine and 
Marlene of U. S. 42 were recent call- 
ers on Mr. and Mrs. Cam Kennedy 
at their new home in Walton. 

Chas. Beall and Miss Minnie Bax- 
ter of <Francisville, were callers on 
friends here Saturday. 

We are glad to report W. L. Oli- 
ver's condition much improved and 
he is expecting to return home from 
the hospital soon. 

Will Nieberding of Erlanger was 
a caller in town Monday. 

Lamar Congleton has purchased 
the Wm. Gross farm joining Boone 
County Airport and is now occupy- 
ing the property. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Cox of La- 
tonda were recent guests of the Wm. 
tMarkesberys. 

Mrs. Bertha Dixon visited Mrs. 
Jennie Dobbins of Jeffersontown, on 



J 



— new — 



ame 



s 



THEATER 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

FBI. & SAT. :: FEB. 10-11 

RANDOLPH SCOTT 

— in — 

CANADIAN PACIFIC 

— — ^ — -^— — — — — — 

SPN. & MON. FEB. 12-13 

Kathryn GRAYSON - Jose ITURBI 
— in— 

THAT MIDNIGHT KISS 



TUE. & WED. 



FEB. 14-15 



FREDHIC MARCH 
—in— 

AN ACT OF MURDER 

THURSDAY :: FEBRUARY 16 

Tim Holt - Richard Martin 
— in — 

BROTHERS IN 
THE SADDLE 



Sunday of last week. She states NOTICE— CONCERNING 
Mi's. Dobbins is in good health and ■ THE WALTON CEMETERY 
is looking forward to visiting rel-f K was voted unani , mous iy that 
atives here during the summer. | thepe ghall lbe no mae , Durials at 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Russ, accom- 1 theWalton Cemetery on Sundays 



panied by Mrs. Cora Darby and Geo. 
i^sFord, departed Wednesday for Flor- 
ida to visit relatives, friends and 
bask in the sunshine of that state. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. Miller enter- 
tained at dinner Sunday for M. M. 
Graham and wife of Park Hills, Mrs. 
Ann Hogan and Mrs. Newton of 
Covington. 

Recent guests of the J. T. Step- 
hensons were Mr. and Mrs. William 
Stoehr, their daughter and husband 
of Connersvilje, Ind., Wallace Ryle 
and wife of Erlanger, Rev. C. L. 
Leopard; Dave Wingate and wife, 
Sydney Ambrose and wife, and Clay- 
ton Brown and family. 

The Rev. W. S. Mitchell family and 
Mrs. W. R. Miller attended the mar- 
riage of a cousin, Miss Barbara 
Penn, to a Mr. Rogers at the Hinton 
(Ky.) Christian Church. They also 
remained for the reception at the 
home of the bride's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. B. Perm. 

J. F. Daugherty, a student at the 
Louisville Medical College, is enjoy- 
ing a few days vacation with his 
wife, Mrs. Martha J. Daugherty, and 
his parents, Dr. and Mrs. Harry 
Daugherty. H. Kerrick Daugherty 
of U. K., was also home for a few 
days. 

Clifton C. Roberts, 49, became sud- 
denly ill Friday at Conner's grocery, 
Florence, where he was employed, 
and was removed to St. Elizabeth 
Hospital where he succumbed late in 
the afternoon. Mr. Roberts, who 
leaves no immediate survivors, made 
his home with a brother-in-law, M. 
G. Martin, Florence. Services were 
held Monday at 2 p. m. from the 
Chmabers & Grubbs funeral home, 
[Florence, with Rev. R. H. Carter of- 
ficiating. Interment was in High- 
| land cemetery. Sympathy is ex- 
tended the relatives. 

Rev. and (Mrs. S. J. Bradley offic- 
iated at the Erlanger Methodist 
j Church, Sunday, in the absence of 
Rev. Dearinf, who is in Florida. 

Pulaski county farmers in 15 years 

have increased their tobacco crops 

from an average of 680 pounds on 

] 1,900 acres to 1,613 pounds on 3,630 

acres. 

Four-H club enrollment in Martin 
county has increased toy 233 mem- 
bers, to bring it to 933 in 27 clubs. 
Gray Bros, of Lyon county are well 
pleased with the 70-acre pasture 
sowed last spring to fescue and 
iLadino clover. 



Also any company- or person wish- 
ing to erect monuments must con- 



tact sexton before erecting same. 
By order of Walton Baptist Church, 

January 18, 1950. 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Moderator 
Bryan Rector, Church Clerk 

3t-6 



EROSION CONTROLLED - 6,400 ft. of terraces. Five demonstra- 

Use of diversion ditches and ter- tioft farms In the county were se- 
races to control erosion in Carroll | lected to prove the value of these 
county was greatly increased in '49, 'methods of water control 
according to Farm Agent Clyde 
Watts. 



Farmers completed 13,600 ft. 
of ditches, 2,900 ft. of channels and I Try Our "WANT ADS 



for Results! 




SPECIALS 

Home Freezers — 8 cu. ft. $220; 12 cu. ft. $300 
Television — Floor samples 1 $85 and Up 

Also — Complete Youngstowri Cabinets and Sinks; 
G. E. and Philco Refrigerators; Gas and Electric 
Ranges; G. E. Water Heaters; Fairbanks-Morse 
Water Pumps. Liberal Trade-In Allowance! 

EASY TERMS! 

R. W. Gross Appliances 

Phone Ind. 5t$l Independence, Ky. 



Baby Chicks 



ft 



George^ doesn't do it for us! 



Of all the forms of commercial transportation, only 
the railroads don't say, "let George do it." 

Unlike their competitors . . . who have outgrown 
the "infant industry" stage, but wKo still rely on 
help from the people's tax dollars . . . America's self- 
supporting railroads pay all their own costs of doing 
business. And that is good news for "George." 

For after all, who is this fellow "George" who is 
building and maintaining the highways, waterways 
and airways- that other carriers use as a "place of 
business" for private gain? He is every taxpayer in 
America. "George" is . . . you I 



But you don't do it for us, "George." The Southern 
Railway pays its own way ... in the time-tested, 
traditional American way. It isn't easy. . . especially 
when we have to compete for business with subsi- 
dized carriers. But it's easier on you and your pocket- 
book, "George" ! And it's better for our country, too. 
Because in the long run, private industries . . . like 
private citizens... must be independently self-reliant 
if America's greatness is to endure. 

S 
PimMnb 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



"«^" 




Pullorum Passed N. H. Reds - White Rocks 

Member of Kentucky Poultry Improving Assn. 

Jamesway Equipment - Salisbury Remedies 

Provico Feeds 



Pollitt'S Hatchery & Supplies 



FLORENCE, KY. 



PHONE 



* 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 



—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



WANT TO BUY— Dead Stock; horses 
$2.50; cows $2.50; hogs 50c cwt, 
according to size and condition. 
I>hone Walton., day 178, night 772, 
or Butler 6901. Griffin Fertilizer 
Co. tt-1 



FOR SALE — Frying chickens, dress- 
ed or on foot. Call (Mrs. Shepherd, 
Walton 1813. lt-6 



FOR SALE— Overhead steel garage 
doors, complete with fixtures. 
John Gault, Jr., Walton Phone 607. 

2t-5* 

■ " -'■ -*■ — — — ' m • 

FOR SALE— Hay, first, second, third 
and fourth cutting alfalfa; also 
Lespedeza and timothy; good clean 
straw; all baled. J. E. Huff, 4 
miles South of Walton, 1% miles 
North of Crittenden, on Wes side 
railroad. Phone Ind. 6499: 4t-4* 

SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE—AH nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine -Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf-1 



FOR THE BEST in Electric wiring- 
Call John T. Campbell, Walton 157. 
Trouble calls day or night. 4t-5* 



FOR RENT — Power Chain Saws with 

one man $3.50 per hour. Phone 

- Florence 419. tf -50 



INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers it's 
members life Insurance, auto and 
truck Insurance (largest dn Ken- 
tucky), fire and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance *nd Blue Cross .Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tf-2 



YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. . . tf-46 



FOR SALE: — Sorrel horse, 7 years old 
1400 lbs. Robert Deatherage, Ken- 
ton Station, Kenton, Ky. 2t-5* 

FOR SALE — Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang-' 
er, Ky. , * tf-1 



FOR SALE — Good work mare, 8 years 
old, good worker. Levi Penning 
ton. Phone Walton 742. 2t-5' 

FOR SALE-^All kinds of Oak Lum 
ber, fancing planks. AH types of 
dressed lumber. Stevens Lumber 
dealer, Phone Florence 419. tf-50 



FOR SALE — Young white brood sow 
with first litter of pigs, 4 pigs left 



8 weeks old. Phone Ind. 5012. 



FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 

First class work, guaranteed, good '<• ■ 

service. Give us a trial. Huber's FOR SALE— Warm 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- Call Walton 774. 
anger,- Ky. tf-2 



2t-5 



Morning stoves. 

Priced $20 each. 

• - 4t-4* 



WILL YO&fi DREAM 
FADE? 







Then 






Dreams can be so beautiful — and seem so real, 
suddenly, with a puff, they're gone. 

BUT your dream of some day owning a farm debt- 
free need not be a vision which disappears — you can 
make it a reality! 

Get a firm, secure hold on your future — on the farm 
you've dreamed of owning outright — by financing it 
through your local National Farm Loan Association, 
with a Federal Land Bank Loan. 

A Federal Land Bank Loan gives you all these worth- 
while advantages: 

• A low interest rate . . . only 4%, 

• Long-term ... up to 40 years, 

• Small semi-annual payments, 

• No appraisal fees, 

• No renewal commissions, 

• No penalty on PRE-payments, 

• Leniency in times of stress, / 

• Cooperative ownership of yojur source of credit. 

Call, Write or^gje/ 

CARL SHERIFF, Secretary-Treasurer 

Williamstown & Boone County National Farm Loan Association 

WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. PHONE 2861 



^FERTILIZER 

Your Co-op atDevon has 7 cars of Fertilizer on hand — 
6-8-6, 4-12-8 and 5-10-10, all superphosphate potash 
tobacco fertilizer ; 3- 1 2- 1 2 and 4- 1 2-8 regular and amonia , 
nitrate, 20% superphosphate and 34% Florida rock 
phosphate. Better order now. Fertilizer will be very 



scarce 



Plenty of fenqe, metal posts, gates and farm machinery 
on hand. 

Bi-County Farm Bureau Co-op 

PHONE FLORENCE 4606 



DEVON, KY. 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — It works, 
it pays, it gets calves. Sign up In 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay- 
lor, Walton 582. fcf-45 



WASTED TO BUY— Several 1000 ft. 
of Ash, Oak and*Walnut lumber 
in the tree. Call Florence 419. 

tf-50 



SLEEPING iroom for rent; boy's suit, 
size 14, and reversible coat, size 
12, for sale. 99 South Main St., 
Walton. lt-6» 

NICHOLSON-AfTWOOD 
HOMEMAKERS 

The highlight of the February 
meeting of the Nicholson-Atwood 
Homemakers Club was a talk on 
Spring Fashions given by Mrs. J. C. 
Fisk at the home of Mrs. F. D. Cooke. 
The meeting was opened by the 
group reading the* club collect, fol 
lowed by the Devotional and the 
Thought of the Day. Roll call was 
answered by each member relating 
"My Most Unusual Experience." 

A committee composed of Mrs. 
Frank Stagman and Mrs. Alfred B' 
Hymer were appointed to make the 
plans for. a luncheon to be given by 
the club. 

Mrs. R. C. Hinsdale gave two very 
interesting readings on Lincoln in 
keeping with the patriotic holidays 
in February. 

Plans for a workshop in March for 
refinishing of furniture were made, 
and the class will be instructed by 
Mrs. Clifford Cornelius and Mrs. J. 
C. Fisk. 

Mrs. R. C. Hinsdale conducted a 
period of games in the afternoon, 
and the meeting was concluded by 
initiation of new members. 

Those present included Mesdam/' 
Raymond Dickson, Alfred B'Hymtt^ 
Ira Stephenson, T. L. Bishop, J. ]K 
Fisk, S. C. Fisk, H. L. Pitcher, J. R! 
Loomis, R. C. Durr, R. C. Hinsdale, 
John Cain, Leslie Wagner, John 
Butler, J. C. Maybugh, Jr., Frank 
Stagman, F. D. Cooke, three guests, 
Mesdames Howard A. Stephens, Rol- 
lie Hume and Miss Gladys Young, 
and the hostesses, Mesdames Arlie, 
Young and Clifford Cornelius. 



S 



Historical Society 

(Continued from Page One) 



Wilmington Missionai ■ r Meet 

The Missionary society or" the Wil- 
mington Baptist Church me,t recent- 
ly in the home of Mrs. Frecj McMil. 
lian. The meeting was called to'orT 
der by the president, Mrs. B. N. 
Spegal. Devotional was, conducted 
by Mrs. Lillian Bridges? Ttoll call 
was answefed with scripture verses. 
Minutes were read and approved. 
Thirty-eight cards were sent and 25 
visits made to the siek. 

A letter from a Missionary .was 
read, telling how the motor bike, 
which the society had presented to 
him, had been stolen tout later re- 
covered. A Missionary quiz was 
conducted by Mrs. W. R. Browm The 
group was dismissed for lunch by 
Mrs. Malcolm Oliver. 

The program in Royal Service, 
"How Christian Is America?" was in 
charge of Mrs. F..H. Bridges, with a 
number of the members taking part. 
Mrs. W. R. Brown led in a Bible quiz, 
followed by prayer by Mrs. B. N, 
Spegal. 

Members present were/jMrs. W. W 
Hanker, Mrs. Malcolm Oliver, Mrs, 
Ray Linder, Mrs. F. H. Bridies, Mrs. 
Marion Collins, Mrs. Chas. Flynn, 
Mrs. B. N". Spegal', Mrs."* Wilfred 
Beighle, Mrs. C. C. Gross, Mrs. James 
Beighle, Mrs. James Kidwell, Mrs. 
Harry Yancey, Mrs. Ralph Kinman, 
Mrs. E. H. Spaulding, Mrs. Robert 
Bell, Mrs. C. Spegal, • Mrs. W. R. 
Brown, Mrs. Fred McMillian, and 
four children. — Pub. Chm. 



tions bear messages that the future 
will need. Many of these have been 
allowed to go to ruin before the in- 
scriptions on the stones had been 
rcorded in some safe place. Not so 
long ago an estate could be settled 
because of a name and date found 
on a partially buried grave stone. 
Family Bibles are sometimes dis- 
carded with little regard for the 
births, marriages and deaths ecord- 
ed in them. 

There are many people throughout 
the county who are aware of the 
great wealth of information that is 
being lost to the future, and they are 
making an effort to help preserve 
facts, legends and folk-lore of Boone 
County 

With this in mind a Boone County 
Historical Society is proposed. A 
meeting has been planned tor Fri- 
day, February 17th at the Florence 
Town Hall at 8:00 p. m. Everyone 
who is interested in knowing more 
about Boone County or who is will- 
ing to pass along some of his know- 
ledge of the county, ds invited to at- 
tend. 

Do you have some article of his- 
toric value, such as an old history, a 
family Bible, a newspaper clipping, 
a relic with historic connection? 
Bring it along so that others may 
see it. Come prepared to tell some 
little-known story from out of the 
past. The teller of the best tale will 
be awarded a prize. 

5 ■■ 

M.Y.F Sub-District Meeting 

The Sub-District meeting was held 
at Williamstown January 23rd. The 
program on the subject of "Faith" 
was given by Falmouth. 

A business meeting was held with 
Mattie Miller as presiding officer. 
'The total attendance was eighty- 

sev^ ^ . '-- L2**- r • >&sv. 

The attendance -srt*Mrd-winter In- 
stitute, Grace Methodist Church of 
Newport, on January 27, in co-oper- 
ation with two other M.Y.F. Sub- 
Districts, urged by President and 
(Counselor, Rev. V. V. Hill. 

Our next meeting is to be held at 
Big Bone, which is a part of Boone 
County Parish. This program will 
feature magic acts, to be given by 
Rev. W. E. Garriott, who is pastor of 
Grace Church, Newport We should 
all try to attend. 



Junior G. A. Meetings 

The Junior G. A. girls of the Wal- 
ton Baptist Church met February 1 
at the church. Those present were 
Janice Osborne, Loretta Johnson, 
Irma Rector, Masil Allem Lexie De- 
Moisey, Tillie Cheesman, Donna Joy 
Wright, Joanna Kent, and Delaine 
Smith; new members, Elizabeth 
Grubbs, Mazie Wayner, Malvina 
Mulling; counselors, Mrs. Burton 
Garrett and Mrs. Lebus Stephenson. 

A program on "Stewardship," was 
given. Later they visited Mrs. Ed- 
die Linton, where scripture verses 
were oread, songs sung, and prayer 
offered. 

The G. A.'s also met at 6;30, Friday 
evening, Feb. 3 in the home of Miss 
Donna Joy Wright for a valentine - 
covered dish supper. Present were: 

Angela Knox, Janice Osborne, 
Irma Rector, Masil Allen,, Lexie De- 
Moisey, Tillie Cheesman, Donna J. 
Wright, JOthna Kent, Delaine Smith, 
Elizabeth Grubbs, Mazie Wagner, 
Melvina Mullins, a new member, 
Pat Matheny, and counselor, Mrs. 
Stephenson. 

The program was on "Biblical 
Menu," and "Who Owns Me?" An 
exchange of valentines was held. 



The next meeting of this group is 
tonight (Feb. 9) at 5:00 for a covered 
dish supper at the church. A Mis- 
sion study book will be taught by 
Mrs. O. K. Powers. AH members 
are requested to be present, and new 
members are welcome. 

WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. l. 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 



WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH - 
Rev. Fred S. Nichols, Pastor 
Frank Penick, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening "Worship 7:30 p. m. 



WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 



A+<f: k, 



GRRNT 

■Vti.LIAMSrOWN.KV - 



MS 2020 

m 



SATURDAY ONLY :: FEB. 11 

2 ACTION HITS $ , 

bit no. 1 

. MONTE HALE— in 

"LAW OF THE GOLDEN. WEST" 

• hit no. 2 

WAYNE MORRIS— in 

"HOUSE ACROSS THE STREET" 



2 DAYS . . . STARTING SUNDAY 
WARNER BROS: 




DIRECTED BY 

RAY 

ENRIGHT - ^ 



TUE. & WED. :: FEB. 14-15 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



f 
JOSEPH COTTEN 

BEYOND the FOREST 

UJoatum. Bam: TUur D/uvmaXic SmcuA ! 

*.S0STMMNQ 

DAVID BRIAN RUTH ROMAN 



THUR. & FRI. :: FEB. 16-17 

2 BIG HITS 2 

. —Hit No. 1— 
GEORGE RAFT-'-in 
"OUTPOST IN MOROCCO" 

—Hit No. 2— 

ALAN "ROCKY" LANE— in 

"WYOMING BANDIT" 



WHEN YOU TAKE VITAMINS 




CALCIUM v 

ANTOTHINAU 



Ol»a-A-Day (brand) MultlpU Vlunh 

iPPotmt . < i K.oh oapraU mm 
wmimnm daily reqatmaonu of aH tb» 
Tttamiiu which hay* baaa attanHihafl aa 
M M It ll l to human Detrition. 

1— Conreniant . . . Jo«t on* aapaula 
today aad jroa can forgot all about it 
■bhi tomorrow. 

S— Economical ... A tinilo i 

limy* 



aaah day la all roapay far and aDroa t 

CvarantMi Taka ana, One-A-Dar 
(brand) MnltlpU Vitamin Capaola aaaa 
day far 60 dan. Your bod*/ baok if 70a 
an not antinlr aatfcfiad. At all drnfcUta. 
■US LABORATORIES. MC. 



DNEWDAY 



30 Head of Livestock 

Farm Implements - Household Goods - Feed 

Wed., Feb. 1510 a. m. 

Located on first road to left past BIG BONE SPRINGS, KY., 1 mile off main road. 

See arrows! Harry Trapp has hold his farm and will sell the following properties 
— -rain or shine — at public auction: 

LIVESTOCK — 2 cows with calves my side ; 3 Jersey heifers ; 2 Whiteface heifers ; 
5 sows and pigs; 4 gilts, bred; 4 boars, ready for service; team of bay mares; team 
of black horses ; 2 coming 3-year-old mules ; 4 coming 2-yr.-old mules ; yearling mule. 

FARM TOOLS — Side^delivery rake ; 2 disc cultivators ; 4 riding cultivators ; rid- 
ing breaking plow ; mower; 3 wagoYis; 2-horse .corn planter; 1 -horse wheat drill; 
2-horse wheat drill; corn crusher; 3-8ection harrow; lot of shovels, plows, etc. 

FEED — About 300 bushels of corn ; also some Household Furniture and numer- 
ous other items. 



Terms: Cash 



Lunch Served by Ladies of Big Bone Methodist Church 



Harry 



1 1 



Owner 



I 



Sale Conducted By 



Col. Lute Bradford Auction Co. 

Col. Lute Bradford and Col. A. F. Worthington, Auctioneers 



Lucian Bradford, Sales Manager 



Phones: Florence 229; Walton 671 



"V 



I 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 







E^ 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



.* 



Mrs. Dan Isbell and two sons of 
Russell Springs, spent the past week 
with her sister and husband, Mr. 
and Mrs. P. R. Connelly. 

Mrs. J. T. Stone was the Tuesday 
guest of Mrs. Mayme Simpson, and 
attended the funeral of Mrs. Charley 
Finnell. . A 

(Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Sleet have 
moved to Latonia Lakes on Taylor 
Mill Road, where Mr. Sleet is man- 
ager of the new office of the Com- 
munity Public Service Company. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stephenson 
(nee Gladys Dudgeon) have gone to 
housekeeping on Stephenson Mill 
Road. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Rouse and son 
'"Buddy" Rouse were weekend guests 
of her sister and husband, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Bertram and family of 
Greenville, Ohio. 

Mrs. Reba Rogers and daughter, 
Dorothy, of Norwood, Ohio, were the 
Saturday night guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Stanley Jones. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hill of Wil- 
liamsburg, Ky., were recent guests of 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Per- 
cival. 



Page Seven 



'ERSOMl 



Mr. and Mrs. Elza Stamper of Ve- 
rona have (moved into the Pruett 
apartment onSouth Main Street. 

Miss Alva Flynn spent iast Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Sexton 
at Erlanger. , 

"Buddy" Rouse left Monday to at 
tend school at the University of Ky., 

Mr. and Mrs. .Harry D. Mayhugh 
of Erlanger have moved into the 
Pruett apartment. ( 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stephenson of 
CarroMton ar«vistt ing their son and 
his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Step- 
henson. 

Mrs. Andrew Penn entertained 
Circle II of the Walton Methodist 
Church, Tuesday evening. 

Mrs. "Dude" Simpson is recuperat- 
ing at her home after a recent oper- 
ation, and is doing nicely. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ward R. Rice, 
a son, Monday, Feb. 6th. 

Mrs. Jimmy Snyder of Erlanger, 
was a recent guest of Mrs. Abbie 
Bush and daughters. 

Betsy Jones was the weekend 
guest of Lynnelle Flynn. 



Uncle Sam Says 



t 




SNOW CROP FROZEN FOODS 

KINGNUT MARGARINE ______ lb. 25c 

COUNTRY STYLE CORN No. 2 can 10c 

NORTHERN TOILET TISSUE 3 for 25c 

SPAGHETTI Q . ... 17-oz. can 10c 

SMOKED CALUES— 5-H>. average lb. 35c 

NAVY BEANS 2 lbs. 17c 

PORK & BEANS— 16-oz. Ky. Brand 2 for 19c 

CANNED MACKEREL can 21c 



Phone Walton 16 



We Deliver 



Used Cars 



For Sale 



1947 Plymouth Custom 1939 Plymouth 4-Door 

5-Passenger Coupe Sedan with 1 946 motor 

1942 Ford 4-Door Sedan 1940 Dodge 4-Door Sedari 

PETTIT'S GARAGE 

INDEPENDENCE, KY. .. PHONE IND. 5057 



HENRY'S BOOTERY 

SHOES ... For the Entire Family . . . SHOES 

Next to Kroger Super Market - Erlanger, Ky. 

MEN'S WORK SHOES $3.98 up 

LADIES' OXFORDS .... J ..... $2.98 up 

BOYS' & GIRLS' OXFORDS $2.98 up 

CHILDREN'S COWBOY BOOTS— 

sizes 5 to 8 $4.95 

sizes 8V2 to 3 $5.95 



Tractor Tires 

REPAIRED and FILLED with SOLUTION 

♦ 

We are now equipped to do expert 
Tractor Repairing and Filling. 

CALL WALTON 38 

B-M SALES & SERVICE 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 




Yon are now at the half-way mark of 
this ZOth Century. The past 49 years 
have witnessed momentous strides 1b 
science, medicine, "engineering-, in short, 
all phases of human endeavor. These 
have provided unlimited opportunities 
for my nephews and nieces, with open- 
ings galore for the practice of their skills 
and ., Inventiveness. In addition, your 
government offers a simple, safe and 
sure method which insures future secur- 
ity for home and family through the 
purchase of U.S. Savings Bonds. By 
enrolling now for the Payroll Savings 
Plan where you work, or if self-em- 
ployed, the Bond-A-Month Plan where 
you bank, you will receive $4 for every 
|3 In ten short years. Make the 1960's 
your goal for that future security. 

V. S. Treasury Department 



Mr. and Mrs. Nick Welsh were the 
Sunday guests of Mrs. Mary K. 
Stephens of near Crittenden. 

Little Sue Evelyn DeJarnette of 
Elyria, Ohio, has been visiting her 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.* Perry 
Mann, the past week. 

Guyolen Carlisle o f Chicago 
Heights, 111., was the weekend guest 
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charley 
Carlisle. 

Mr, and-iM-" w r"*""*Tfj£ 1 — ~~*. 
Cheviot, Ohio, we're" Tne 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Sebree. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Symmey of 
Nicholson, were Sunday guests of 
their daughter and husband, Mr. and 
Mrs". Leo Flynn, and family. 

m 



vmxn' 



*r4m 



mm 



m 






u.s , 



Planted wisely, the money you have 
this year of 1950 can be the seed that 
grows into dreams come true, a harvest 
of farm or ranch expansion, education 
for the children or that long vacation 
trip you've wanted. Invest every possi- 
ble penny in U.'s. Savings Bonds, then 
every $3 you plant today will yield $4 
In 1960. Bonds are just as important a 
part of a well-managed farm as is land, 
livestock or machinery. With U. S. Sav- 
ings Bonds, your financial reserves are 
in the safest possible form and readily 
available. Your bank offers a simple 
Bond-A-Month Plan for your conven- 
ience. (J. S. Treasury Department 



'FIGHT 

rOUS 
TENSION? 



«*? 



Miles JSorvine lends to relax nervous 
tension, to permit refreshing sleep. It 
has helped thousands. Why not give 
it a chance to help you? 

Try Miles NERVINE 

when nervous tension makes you 
jumpy, cranky, sleepless, or gives 
you nervous headache. Your druggist 
hat Mile* Nervine — liquid and effer- 
vescent tablets. Try them. Your money 
back if you are not sat- 
isfied. CAUTION— use 
only as directed. Effer- 
vescent tablets, 35c and 
75c — Liquid, 25c and 
$1.00. Miles Laborator- 
ies, Inc. Elkhart. Ind. 

AT AU 

MUM 

ITOBS. 



MILES 

NERVIN 




PUBLIC SALE 

At the D. D. Force Farm, V/ 2 Miles from Warsaw, Ky., on State Highway No. 35 

Saturday, Feb. 18 ill 

LIVESTOCK— Regi«teredHererords: Polled Bull calf, 8 months old; 3 Horned 
Bull calves, 8 montKs old; 2 Polled Heifer calves, 8 months old*;' .all above calves 
vaccinated for Bangs; Polled Bull, 20 months old; 2 Polled cows, 3 years old, bred; 
4 Horned tows, 3 years old, bred. Roan cow, 9 years old; Guernsey cow, 6 years 
old, calf by side; Jersey cow, 4 years old, calf by side; Jersey cow, 4 years old; all 
cows listed, Bangs tested; mare, 5 years old; 2 Registered Duroc sows, third litter 
last of March; 3 Duroc gilts, will have farrowed by day of sale ; spotted Poland China 
boar, about 200 lbs. ; 1 3 shoats, about 70 lbs. 

FARM MACHINERY— 1945 Ford 11/2-tqn truck, actual mileage 20,000 miles; 
1946 VAC Case tractor with- hydraulic poow and cultivator; 2-wheel tractor trailer; 
feed grinder; Turner 2-wheel baler, 2 years old, like new; Ideal manure spreader; 
'Avery horse disc, 12-disc; "A" harrow; 6-ft. cuitipacker; 2-4iorse sled; 2-horse 
scraper; 1 -horse corn drill, like new; iron-beam rounder; wood-beam rounder; Syra- 
cuse hillside plow; hog feeder; 7 tons timothy and lespedeza hay; 3 tons alfalfa hay. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— Coleman *4-foom oil heater, like now; small 
Heatrola; small Simon Wilsonjieater ; divan, will make bed; Oak bed and springs; 
other small household articles too numerous to mention. 



•"■ * 



TERMS MADE KNOWN DAY OF SALE 
— Hot Lunch. Served by the Warsaw Homemakers Club — 



Mrs. R. R. Hulette - H. L. Rea 

Col. Chas. Duncan & Son Auction Co. 



Phones: 2301 - 2752 



Warsaw, Ky. 



HE 
LIGHTED 

THE 
-WAY 



c 



a-* 



''/«<»\\&^. 



^ 



THOMAS ALVA EDISON 

Fob. 11, 1 847 -Oct. IS, 1931 



OM 



REDDY KILOWATT 

Your -lactric Servant 



...to BETTER LIVING! 



P ROB ABLY no other man in history did more 
*■ co raise living standards in his lifetime ■-□*_. 
Thomas Alva Edison. 

Through his invention of the incandescent lamp 
and his many other discoveries in the field of dec* 
tricity, Edison brought better light and better elec- 
trical living to all the world. 

Today, electricity is serving more people in mere 
ways at lower cost than ever before. You have on.jr 
to imagine life without electric service to realim 
what Edison's achievements have meant to mankind. 

Small wonder then that Edison lives on in the hearts 
and minds of a grateful humanity. His genius has 
made life brighter and work lighter for •veryoo*. 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

tNCO 



INCORPOHATSD 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 




VISALIA 



» i ij 



The Visalia Baptist Chiy^h was 
very fortunate to have eight students 
from Georgetown College conduct 
a Weekend Mission Revival at the 
church, Feb. 4 and 5. The church 
was filled to capacity and everyone 
enjoyed the special music and songs, 
some of which were sung in the nat- 
ive language of the students. 

The W. M. S. of the Visalia Bap- 
tist Church met at the home of Mrs. 
Ray Howard for a Cottage Prayer 
Meeting, Thursday night. Those in 
attendance and taking part were 
Mesdames Joe Setters, Vinson Neus- 
pickle, Dan Trapp, Thomas McClure, 
Harry Caldwell, Shirley Halderman, 
Howard Frederick. The program 
chairman, Mrs. John (McClure, con- 
ducted the meeting. The next reg 



Mrs. Florence Stein, Mrs. Howard 
Frederick and family. 

We are very sorry to hear that Mrs. 
John iMcClure is confined . to her 
home because of ^llness and hope 
that she will soon be feeling like be 
ing out again. 

CARD OF THANKS — * 

I wish to express my thanks to my 
friends for their prayers and the 
many cards sent me during my ill- 
ness. 
lt-6* —David Rae Neumeister 



INDEPENDENCE R; 1 



We are glad to report Mrs. Roy 
Payne doing as well as can be ex 
pected. Mrs. Payne fell down her 
basement steps one day the past 



ular meeting of the W. M. S: will be j week and dislocated her shoulder, 
held in the home of Mrs. Jphn Mc- I The oyster and pie social given by 
Clure «jf Thursday night, Feb. 16. jthe Staffordsburg Church, Saturday 
Woodrow Roark is still in St Eliz- evening was well attended and we 

abeth Hospital, following an opera- wish to thank everv one who con " 
tion. • jtributed and attended. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Keeney called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mills of Ve- 
rona, Sunday afternoon. 
- , Mrs. Daisy Richardson and dau- 

James.Cain attended church ghter, Helen, spent Sunday with Mrs 



William Heegar is at home and 
recovering from a very serious op- 
eration. 

Mrs 



for the first time since she sprained Ne ll Mann of Hamilton, Ohio, 
her ankle four weeks ago. - Mr . and Mrs . Harley Hanna araJ 

Mrs. Edith Ware entertained the son spent Sunday with his parents, 
following guests Sunday: Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hanna. 
Mrs. James Davis and Diana, Mr. Mrs. Will Gadker returned home 
and Mrs. Lloyd Cook and Myrna, Friday afternoon after attending the 



Absolute Auction 

SAT., FEB. 11th - 11:00 A. 



On Holbrook and Lawrenceville Road, Y 2 Mile from 

Taft Highway, Grant County, Kentucky 

On account of the health of Mr. and Mrs. Guy A. Piner, they have 
signed an Absolute Auction contract with Rel C. Wayman & Sons 
and Baxter Blair, licensed real estate and auction brokers, to sell at 
absolute auction, regardless of price of weather, their farm contain- 
ing 93% acres; it has a good 5-room house with 2 porches and a 
pantry; smoke house with basement; good chicken house, and other 
outbuildings; 2 good barns, with electric in every building; 2-acre 
tobacco base fpr 1950; 7 acres alfalfa; everlasting water, pond, 3 
springs, 1 sulphur spring that never runs dry', and 2 cisterns at the 
house; school bus, mail route and milk route. 

Some household furniture and some antiques; 2 radios, antique 
marble-top dresser, 175 years old ; antique side-saddle for woman. 

LIVESTOCK— Two No. 1 cows, one will be fresh soon; 1 heifer, 6 
months old; 1 extra good team of horses and harness, and one un- 
browen filly, 4 years old. 

FARMING TOOLS — All kinds of tools; mowing machine, hay 
rake, wagon with hay frame, good sled, new cutting harrow, plows 
of all kinds, forks andhoes, logchains, iron keltta. tobacco sticks, 
100 yards tobacco canvas; 1939 LaSalle sedan, iOood condition. 

—Entertainment by Frank Miller and the Kefi Icky Fiddlers— 

FREE— A Fat Pig to the Lucky Ticketlfei £r— FREE 

(At Opening of Sale) 



REL C. WAYMAN & 




Licensed Real Estate and Auction Brokers 

623 Washington Street Covington, Kentucky 

HEmlock 5107; Independence 5064; Evenings, JUniper 4895 
Baxter Blair, Grant-co. Agent— Williamstown 7351 
"WANT ACTION? 



AUCTION IT!" 



Farm and Home Convention in Lex- 
ington, the past week. 

Miss Rosemary Binder spent the 
wekend with relatives in Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Damon were 
guests of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Damon, Sunday. 

We are glad to report we had an 
extra good attendance at Staffords- 
burg Sunday, school Sunday. All 
come back next Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will House of inde- 
pendence entertained one day the 
past week for her sister and hus- 
band, Mr. and Mrs. Will Summey, in 
honor of their 45th wedding anni- 
versary. The writer wishes them H 
many more happy and prosperous 
anniversaries. 



SPARTA R. 2 



Mr. and Mrs. Jack Woody, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. A. Miller, Mr, and Mrs. Her- 
bert Pqe and family and Mrs. Ag- 
gie Easton visited Mr. and Mrs^El; 
rner Henderson and family, Saturday 
night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Carver were the 
Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. M. Arrasmith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Billy Crouch and 
baby of Norwood, Ohio spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Hem- 
ingway and family. 

Elfrie Henderson was very sick 
Tuesday night with acute indiges- 
tion. 

Lawrence Groves was a visitor in 
Covington, Tuesday. 

Mrs. Susie Barton still remains on 
the sick list. 

Little Miss Louise Henderson miss- 
ed several days of sohool the past 
week. She had a severe cold. 

Mrs. J. E. Gross attended the fun- 
eral of Mrs. Caldwell at Carrollton, 
■Wednesday, .„ .^ -*,*,. 

Mr. and Mrs. ElmerHenderson and 
children were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Woody. 

Mrs. Paul Carver and daughter, 
Miss Jean, were callers in Warsaw, 
Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elfrie Henderson and 
H. N. Wright were in Warsaw, Wed- 
nesday on business. 



<* IB 



For Sale - In Walton 

Six-room house, 1 acre, in Walton, one square off Dixie 
Highway; 4 rooms down, finished, 2 rooms up, partly 
finished, street, water; immediate possession; $3,500. 

W. D. Johnson 



Beaver Grade, Walton, Ky. 



Phone Walton 203 



For the Best In Heating 
J arman Heating Service 



WALTON 



524 or 921 



Engineered Heating— Coal, OIL 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



We, the undersigned, have contracted with Tanner Bros, to sell at public auction at 
the property known as the Dr. Sininger farm, 3 miles South of Florence and 2 miles 
North of Union, Ky., on U. S. 42. This sale is being held because Floyd Sininger is 
discontinuing farming. v 

Sat, Feb. 18 10 a.m. 

27— HEAD DAIRY CATTLE— 27 

.._ 7 3ryear-old Holstein cow with calf by side; 7-year-old Holstein co wwith calf by 
side; 4-year-old Holstein cow, heavy milker; 8-year-old Holstein cow, to be fresh by 
day of sale; 4-year-old Guernsey cow, heavy springer; 5-year-old Guernsey cow, 
giving good flow of milk ; 4-year-old Jersey cow, giving good flow of milk ; 5-year- 
old Jersey cow,, calf by side; 3 5-year-old Jersey cows, giving good flow of milk; 5- 
year-old Jersey cow, heavy springer; 8-year-old Jersey cow giving good flow of milk ; 
6-year-old Jersey cow, heavy milker; 2-year-old Holstein heifer; 3 1 8-months-old 
Guernsey heifers; 2-year-old Red heifer; 2 1 8-months-old Jersey heifers; 4 10- 
monthsrold Jersey and Guernsey heifers; 2-year-old Guernsey bull; 1 -year-old Jer- 
sey steer. 

28 HEAD HOGS— 5 fat hogs, 350-400 lbs.; sow, 400 lbs. ; 22 shoats, 80-100 lbs. 

FARMING TOOLS — 2-horse corn planter with fertilizer attachment; 1 cut-off 
saw; DeLaval milking machine with 2 units; 2^50-gal. oil drums; 2 14-gal. oil drums; 
,2*gil drumpumpsr.many small tools of all kings. % - - «* _■■. 

FEED — Ton mixed hay, baleU ; some corn and wheat. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— 6-burner table-top oil stove ; 2 coal ranges; living 
roo msuite; dining room suite; kitchen cabinet; studio couch; coal heating stove; 
Heatrola ; laundry stove ; lot of chairs ; linoleum rugs ; several window screens ; lot 
of fruit jars; many more articles too numerous to mention. 

Terms Made Known Day of Sale Lunch Served by Gunpowder Homemakers 

Sininger & Sininger, Owners 

Tanner Bros., Auctioneers 



CHAS. M. TANNER 
Phone Florence (Ky.) 728 



DAVID L. TANNER 
Phone Walton (Ky.) 155 




r U Hf L K than ever! 

RE VALUE a 



an ewer i 



f 



For Sale 

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15, 1950 

—At 12 O'clock Noon— 

At Williamstown Stock Yards 



WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. 

Tractors and Tractor Plows and Pises; Grain Binders 
I and Manure Spreaders; Corn Binders; a complete line 
of all kinds of farm implements. 

jJHErJVIOODY 




^-Ss'^wsifsx&o* 



NOW. m • the most powerful truck engine 
Chevrolet ever offered you ... THE LOAD-MASTER "105" ENGINE 




: ■ 



ADVANCE-DESIGN TRUCKS 

Performance Leaders • Pi 



Here is power aplenty— the Load- 
Master 105-h.p. engine— the new 
heavy-duty engine in the most 



more performance in the light- 
and medium-duty field! 

Come in and see these two 



powerful Chevrolet trucks ever greatest Chevrolet power plants. 



built! 

Here is value aplenty— the fa- 
mous Thrift-Master Engine— now 
stepped up to 92-h.p, to give 



Whichever suits you best, remem- 
ber this: Chevrolet's your boy 
with more power than evert more 
value than ever! 



L*. 



ayioad Leaders • Popularity Leaders 



l; 



Pricr Leaders 



DIXIE 

Phone 95 




■'is^r-- 



(J«! 



■w 



Waltdni Ky- 



■•**-■ *-y* 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Nine 



1 VERONA 



Friends of Pat Sturdivent willbe 
glad to know that one a visit to his 
doctor last week, he learned he was 
doing very well, much better than 
was expee^l. 



L. J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

and 

optjc^n _ t> 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 
HEmlock 0535 

Office Hours . . . 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



fiillle Mac Waller, who attends 
school at Berea, was home between 
semesters and Ireturned on Monday 
of last week. 

Mrs. J. C. Kannady, who went 
home with her daughter, Mrs. Lou 
Margolin of Cincinnati recently, re- 
turned home on Wednesday of last 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Waller and son 
entertained on Sunday of last week 
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Lamn and Mrs. 
Lizzie Noel, 

Mrs. • Lenabelle Harris, who went 
home with her son, Wilbur Harris of 
Memphis, Tenn., and his family at 
Christmas, returned home last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rouse and Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Hamilton, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clayton Renaker andBilly Mac 
Waller, and MarionArch Waller and 
Earl Kannady went to Owingsville, 
Ky., to see the basketball game be- 
tween Owingsville and Walton- 
Verona High. , 

Those from New Bethel who at- 
tended the quarterly meeting in 
Latonia last Thursday were Mrs. 
Walter Renaker, Mrs. J. T. Roberts, 
Mrs. Allie Chandler, Mrs. Arsolia 
Hayden, Mrs. Pat Sturdivent, Mrs. 
J ; T, Glore. Mrs. William Walter and 
Mrs. Lizzie Noel. 

Try Our "WANT AD§" for Results! 



EXPERT 
WASHER 
REPAIR 

Any Make 

Parts for All 
Popular Makes 

Just Give Us A Call . . 
DIXIE 7113 




HAGEDORN'S 



856 Dixie Highway 



Erlanger, Kentucky 



Ha milton & Jones inv^s you to sh OP i 

Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" 
LOWEST PRICES 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



*r* 



THE NEW DE LAVAL STERLING SPEEDETTE 

Especially Designed 
for the Man Who 



f 




KW SPCHETIE 

vacuum nnr 

— ntvet n quirts 

olllni dlrect-con- 

mcttd to motor; 

110 V omtition. 



INJIAU«TI0K 
ADO FITTiMS 
— quicKar intf 
chftpwblnitall, 
••tier to in*. 





n» standard 
oe uval stermnb 

SHUMt •HIT 

— for best milking, 

fislest diininf, 

long l>f«. 



/./falMlhlllUL 



mmmmmmm 



Milks Ten Cows 
or Less! 

The new De Laval Sterling Speed- 
ette is designed especially (or the 
man milking 10 cows or less. Your 
pocketbook can afford it— and you 
can't afford to be without it ! It will 
save up to 68 full working days I 
year on a 10-cow herd, save you 
countless steps, do the milking In 
half the time and produce more and 
cleaner milk for you. See it today! 



WMUIII toVourToughest 
^ptSSgRequirementsr 




For a plow with 
plenty of brute 
strength . . . high 
lift for easy turning 
and transporting . . . 
pins the extra clear- 
ance necessary for 
deep plowing in 
trashy conditions, 
you'll find a John 
Deere Truss-Prom* 
Plow unsurpassed. 
Its many features 
make it a real leader 
in two-, three-, and 
four-bottom .plow 
ralue. See us for 
full details.. 



LM 0£ER[ TRUSS-FRAME PIOWS 



W> 






The Jansen Hardware Co. 



lid PIKE STREET 



COVINGTON, KY. 



| STAFFORDSBURG | 



Mrs. Bess Hill told us of the very 
serious operation which was anti- 
cipated for her brother, Roy Mc^ 
Danold, who is remembered here by 
friends of his younger days. He is 
in the C. & O. hospital in Hunting- 
ton. We wish for him a speedy re- 
covery. 

We are glad to report a good at- 
tendance at Sabbath School. At the 
preaching service last Sunday, our 
pastor, Rev. Wheary, talked to us 
very earnestly on family relations, 
basing his remarks on the story of 
Mary and Martha. 

An oyster and pie supper was held 
at the church on Saturday evening, 
February 4th. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barnett took 
their son Howard to a school near 
Muncie, Ind., where heplans to get 
his teachers certificate 5 . We wish 
him success. 

We were sorry to learn of the ill- 
ness of Edward Binder. 

We rgeret that Mrs. Lucille Webb 
is not making the satisfactory re- 
covery for which we hoped. 

Mr. and Mrs. "L. J. Rapp returned 
on Friday of last week from their 
trip to Florida. They report a fine 
vacation. 

Mrs. Denver Binder entertaine-1 
the Homemakers for the January 
meeting. Most members were pres- 
ent, but the absence of Mrs. Delia 
Williams, who is ill, Mrs. Rapp, who 
was away, and Mrs. Klein, whose 
husband is in the hospital, left a big 
space in our discussions. 




INDEPENDENCE 



Clarence Davis, brother of Mrs. 
Frank Cox, died at the hospital in 
Georgetown and funeral was held 
last Wednesday, Feb. 1 at Sadie- 
ville. The sympathy of the com- 
munity is extended to the family. 

The Independence Fire Depart- 
ment made a follow-up run Friday 
for the Taylor Mill Fire Department 




When The Crash 

Comes - Be 

Protected 

P~*^&{utucil Insurance 
^r Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON. KY. 




RAY HALL 

Manufacturing Optician 

Doctor's Optical Prescriptions 

Accurately Filled, Broken 

Lenses Replaced. Expert 

Optical Repairing 



122 PIKE ST. COVINGTON 
HEmlock 1992 




W. R. McGUIRE 

MOVING 

AND EXPRESSING 

Local and Long Distance 

Packing, Crating and Shipping 

—18 YEARS EXPERIENCE— 

Office . . . Second' Floor 

32 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. 

PHONE DIXIE 8145 



but did not have to go into action. 

Robert Griffin and sons, Freddie 
and Moody, were sick last week. • 

John M. Murray, 86, of Morris Sta- 
tion, was buried last Sunday. 

J. C. Armstrong has been down a 
few days with a severe cold. 

Supervised recreation for Sunday 
pupils of the Independence Baptist! 
Sunday School is held in the church ! 
basement each Saturday night from 
7:00 to 10:00. Juniors, intermediates 
and young people are eligible if they 
have regular attendance. • 

Mrs. Nan Bagby is reported very 
sick these days. 

The Boy Scouts are giving a spag- 
hetti dinner from 5 to 9 p. m., Sat- 
urday, Feb. 11. Tickets 50 cents. 

Rev. Augillard, Frenchman, will 
speak Thursday at 7:30 p. m„ Feb. 
16th. On the following night Rev. 
Rounds, an Indian worker, speaks. 
These services are to toe in the In- 
dependence Baptist Church. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

m f f^TM ITY ° CORP. 

*▼! W n£l 1 • Ann M»^;.«« Av.. fnv. 



CORP. 

427 MadUon Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



STURGEON 



Electrical Service 

—Wiring of All Kinds— 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 
* —Phone 71 or 1396 — 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Tarda 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market in the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to Us. Why 
not now? 

Reference: Ask the first 

-s mZ — man you meet ■ 



. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

613 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday. 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



DR. PAOL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To ,- 
. Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



MASTER MIX 

/,) COMPLETE 

>^-rrn / CONCENTRATES 
"SSSB- flND 

^ STRAIGHT FEEDS 



Bring In 250 lbs. Corn and Mix with 100 lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig Starter at a low^cost of only $3.15 pet *°<N|"^ 

Walton Feed Mill 




Incorporated 



WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 57 



There Is (ART) In A RTISTIC 

—FREE CALL & DELIVERY— 
16 South Main St. Phone 144 Walton, Ky. 



Fur Coats Cleaned & Glazed 

Altering Invisible Reweaving 

Relining ' Dyeing 

Leather and Suede Jackets Refinished Like New 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quality Work . . . Guaranteed 
— - — r- . — All Garments Insured— 



I. C. GAINES Prop. DAVE WORKMAN* 




Pontiac Trade-In Sale 

All our used cars have been reconditioned by our expert factory-trained mechanics and the follow- 
ing items checked: Tune motor, carburetor, spark plugs, valves, starter, battery, points, generator, 
radiator, wheel alignment, steering, brakes, transmissions, differential, lights — carry our guarantee. 

'49 Pontiac "6" sed. cpe. Hy dramatic; like new $1995 

'48 Pontiac grey hy dramatic sedan .... $1695 

'47^Fontiac 2-tone sedan; low mileage . . . $1395 

'48 Oldsmobile "6" Hydramatic, 2-Door . . $1695 

'46 Chevrolet station wagon; like new . . . $1095 

'46 Chevrolet black fleetline sedan . ... $1095 

'47 Ford super de luxe maroon sedan » . . $1095 

'48 Hudson brown sedan; low price $1495 

'47 Dodge black de luxe sedan $1295 

'38 Dodge black sedan; unusual . . . $395 

'39 Dodge club coupe . $395 

*37 Dodge business coupe ^_ * . _ . ^_ $295. 

'36 Ford grey tudor; low price .*•••■". $195' 
Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 

Terms to Suit - Up to 24 Months to Pay! 

Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 



1V~e»" 



Page Ten 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 9, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION 1^^ 



Classified advertising rats is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash in advance. 

FOR SALE— Two registered Guern- 
sey cows, 1, heifer and a buTJ; 5 
grade Jersey cows, heavy spring- 
ers. J. K. Franks, Williams-town, 
Ky. Phone 2932. 2t-6* 

FOR SALE— Jersey cows, $175 and 
$200. Charles Napier, Highway 16, 
near Verona. Phone Gleneoe 2T07. 

2t-6* 



FOR SALE— VeTy good high protein 
Soybean hay, baled. Phone Ind. 
6882. tf-6 

MEN'S Army type Combat, boots, 
$6.95; boys' Army type, $5.95. 
Henry's Bootery, next to Kroger's 
Super Market, Erlanger, Ky. lt-6 

FOR SALE— Quaker, oil burner, 250- 
gallon oil tank, and studio couch; 
all good condition. Bob Morgan, 
24 Bedinger Ave., Walton. lt-6* 

FOR SALE— 2 good used John Deere 
tractors, just reconditioned, that 
we have taken in on" trade for new 
John Deere- tractors; tobacco cot- 
ton, AAA gr^de, $9.50. Pettit's 
Farm Machinery Co., Williams- 
town, Ky. Phone 4931. 2t-6 



- Horse-drawn manure 

Shamrock Farm, Rich- 

lt-6* 



FOR SALE ■ 
spreader, 
wood, Ky. 

FOR SALE — Austra White laying 
hens, 10 months old, fat and heavy, 
cheap. 32 Edwards Ave., Walton. 
Phone 518. lt-6* 



FOR SALE— Timothy hay; will de- 
liver. Roxie Helleman Place on 
LLL Highway. Phone Ind. 5155. 

lt-6* 



NOTICE— We are now getting plenty 
of Sunday Enquirers; you do not 
have to take the daily paper to 
get Sunday delivery. Phone Wal- 
ton 66. • 2t-5* 



FOR SALE — Hay, straw, corn, alf- 
alfa, mixed hay, timothy, wheat 
or oat straw. Russell Klein, 
Morning Viey, Ky. Phone Ind. 6427 

6t-5* 



FOR SALE— Set double tug harness 
with ohecklines, no bridles. Jas. 
Brewer, Verona, Ky., Route 1. 2t-6* 



FOR RENT — Three-room apartment, 
unfurnished, heat and water fur- 
nished. W. W. Ryle, 44 South Main 
St., Walton. Phone 26. tf-4 



WANTED — Team of mules or small 
horses. Henry Harrison, Morning 
View, Ky. Phone Ind. 6709. 2t-6* 



FARMS WANTED— Small or large; 
we have a large list of customers 
waiting. For quick, reliable realty 
service, call us. Sallee Real Estate 
Co., 108 Locust St., Erlanger, Ky. 
Phone Dixie 7119. tf-4 



FOR SALE— 60 White Leghorn pul- 
lets, now laying, $1.50 each. Daw- 
*«« E.""H:- -■*&&• 1, Wal- 

Rhone Ind. 7284. 2t-6* 



ton. 



FOR SALE — Stoker and furnace, 
complete. Conco stoker with all 
controls, thermostat, limit control, 
and time control. 24" furnace in 
good condition, all hot air pipes 
included. Will handle 5 to 10- 
room house. Entire lot $110. Can 
now be seen in operation. Erlanger 
6506. . lt-6 



FOR S*ALE— 200 bales third cutting 
alfalfa. Russell Sparks, Verona, 
Ky. Phone Walton 289. lt-6* 

FOR SALE — Kenton county farm, 
close in, good dairy or tobacco 
land, in bluegrass; house, barn. 
Owner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, 
Ky. 4t-5* 



FOR SALE— Gray mare, 9 years old; 
hay loader; iron-wheel wagon; 
hay frame; wagon bed; mowing 
machine; com d*i.Uv »~ ""^jjfeex 
-f-^j 7}** ; 5-Shbvel , CUru iSS/l 
Farmmaster milker, 2 single units; 
doubletrees, singletrees, neckyoke; 
1932 Desoto coach. Robert Hoff- 
man, Green Road, Walton. 2t-5* 



WANTED — One dozen young Leg- 
horn hens, brown preferred; state 
price and location. M. Cleek, El- 
liston, Grant County, Ky. lt-6* 



FOR SALE — Wagon with box bed; 
disc harrow; 2 mowing machines. 
Martin Code, Green Road, Walton, 
Route 1. Ph*Sne Ind. 6725. 2t-6* 



FOR SALE — Fresh Holstein cows, 
young, T. B. and Bangs tested, 
calfhood vaccination. Lawrence 
Turner, 1 mile West of Walton on 
Stephenson Mill Road. Phone Wal- 
ton 741. 2t-6* 



LOST — Green billfold with cream \ 
band, containing valuablepapers. 
ward, if returned tcr 



otel, Walturh" 



it-e 



FOR SALE — First, second and third 
cutting of alfalfa, bailed; timothy 
and clover; also timothy and clov- 
er, mixed. McBee Bros., Williams- 
4own. Phone Williamstown 4192 
or 4073. ' 8t-4* 



FOR SALE — Four 3-year-old ewes 
and a buck. Phone Walton 144. 

lt-6* 



FOR SALE— Alfalfa hay and straw; 
wire fence, barb wire, metal gates 
Field seed of all kinds; all kinds 
of Dairy and Poultry Feed. Walton 
& Readnour, Walton, Ky. Phone 
154. 2t-5 



Hamilton & Jones . invites You to shop! 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



FEBRUARY 



SPECIALS! 

5.00 



Ladies' Better Dresses $ 

Prices slashed • Orig. $8.15 and Up 

♦ See these Bargains #> 

Ladies' Suede Shoes $ 

Black and Brown - Orig. 2.95 and 3.95 

Other Suedes reduced to $2.99 

Men's Wool Sweaters . 1 .98-2.98 



1.99 



No Exchanges 



All Sales Final 



SPRING PRINTS— cloth of gold 49c yd. 

PLAIN BROADCLOTH— assorted colors ... 49c yd. 

UNBLEACHED MUSLIN - 35c yd. 

WHITE INDIAN HEAD— ideal for pillowcases 79c yd. 

LADIES' NEW SPRING BLOUSES ■ $1.39 - $3.50 - $3.98 



GIRLS' POLO SHIRTS— sizes 4 to 14 



*. 



s*> 



$1.10 - $1.39 
98c 



LITTLE BOYS' POLO SHIRTS— sizes 1 to 8 

"ALL PURPOSE" CHANEL SCARF ..„. $1.10 

PURE SILK HEADSCARFS __„— ~ — — - $1.49 



! CONRAD HARDWARE! 



Special This Month . $99.50 Cash 



MfrWM 



ROYAL E 

POWER MOWER 




WIZARD WICK 

DEODORIZER 



Wliord Wick ceitt ltt» 
— ke.p (•vtrol boftl.» 
handy. Kills edert In 

kitchtn, bathroom, 
bottmenl and doMtt. 



Ov.r 250,000 Saf/«fi.d ».o (tor* 



' 1% HP 4 CYCLE M0 IHGIMt 
H ALL THE BETTER REO FEATURES: 



• Kg capacity. FirH 21" cutting 
width, "cut* more gra» with 
(•*» gat." 

• Qricfc ttartfc^ "% % 4-cyd* 

t«a engine uses "'regular" gat. 

• Easy to hondle. 



• CKrnbi stoop MM*. 



r •ncloMd V-to* ctotoh owl 






7 cu. ft. Gibson Refrigerator „..., $189.95 

Used 3 cu. ft. Kelvinator Refrigerator $50.00 

Perfection Gas Range (installed) :. $299.00 

Perfection Electric Range (installed) $299.00 

Perfection Kerosene Range $159.00 

Gibson Electric Range (installed) .,. $239.00 

Boys or Girls Bicycle $38.00 

Jamesway Electric Hover _" $39.95 

Jamesway Electric Heated 8-gal. Fount $10.80 

Jamesway 5-ft. Feeder .=„„„ „__.. $6.00 

Complete Line of Jamesway Hay Carriers and Track 

Interior Gloss Enamel gal. $4.95 

Flozotone Water Paint gal. $2.85 



8-ft. Lime Spreader 

on rubber _ $185.00 
Massey-Harris Tobacco 

Setter $195.00 

Little Giant Lime 
t Spreader $69.50 

OLD ENGLISH 

SCRATCH COVER 

POLISH 

6 ozs. 250 

Hidei scratch.! and polish** 
f ur nilur., both at th. tarn, ttme ■- 

Eclipse Lawn Mower, 
20-inch cut ... $114.50 

Bissell Carpet 

Sweeper % . $6.95 




■ i 




Dayton Water Sys. $74.50 



for Service 



Largo or Small 



Seo Powers 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES 01 HOUSEHOLD 

APPLIANCES 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKY 



BABY CHICKS— iReduced Prices! Ohio 
Ohio U. S. Approved, Pullorum 
Controlled. Chicks hatching every 
Sunday, Monday and Thursday. 
Plenty of chicks on hand at all 
times. Open day and night. New 
Hampshires, White and Barred 
Rocks, $10.90 per 100; all pullets, 
$13.90; cockerels, $11.50. S. C. 
White Leghorns, $11.90; pullets, 
$2450; cockerels, $3.00. Buff, White 
and Black Minorcas, Buff Leg- 
horns, Austra Whites, $12.90; pul- 
lets, $26.00; cockerels, $6.00. S. C. 
Reds, v Buff Bocks, Buff Orphing- 
tons, White Wyandottes, Hamp- 
Rock Cross, Rock-Hamp Cross, 
$11.90; pullets, $14.90; cockerels, 
' $12.50. White and Black Giants, 
Light Brahmas, $13.95. Heavy as- 
sorted, all heavies, $9.50 per 100. 
JPlenty of White Rocks and New 
Hampshires one week old on hand 
at $13.90 per 100; two weeks old, 
$17.90. White Pekin Ducklings, 
$30.00 per 100. Orderyour turkey 
poults now, for delivery any time 
after March 15, at $89.00 per 100. 
Turkeys and Ducks hatching on 
Sundays, only. We carry a full 
line of .poultry supplies, feeders 
and founts, poultry remedies, and 
thermometers. Drive to this mod- 
ern hatchery and see these expec- 
ifcional bargains. Visitors welcome. 
Phone Jackson 9354. Mt. Healthy 
^Hatcheries, Winton and McKelvey 
toads, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. lt-6* 



FOR SALE— Kentucky U. S. approv- 
ed, pullorum passed chicks, White 
blocks and N. H. Reds. Pollett's 
Hatchery & Supplies, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 159. Jamesway Equipment, 
Salisbury Remedies and Provico 
Feeds. 4t-§ 



FOR SALE — Warm Morning stove. 
Plhon* Walton 606, or see Buddy 
Whitson. lt-6* 



CHICKS and Hatching Eggs from 
high producing, pullorum-tested 
Reds. Breeders immunized against 
Newcastle. Chicks from such a 
flock can make money for you. 
Grant Maddox, Florence. Phone 
384. 6t-2 



FOR SALE — 75 tons' good quality 
mixed clover and timothy hay, 
70% clover. Ralph Jones, Pleasant 
Plain, Ohio, 30 miles Northeast of 
Cincinnati. 4t-6* 



PLUMBING & HEATING— Repairs or 
new installations, furnace clean- 
ing and service on stokers, gas or 
oil furnaces. Tri-County Heating 
and Plumbing Co. Florence 593. 
♦ tf-49 



FOR SALE— 1946 Ford tractor and 
plows; '48 Ford tractor and plows. 
Phone Walton 606. Buddy Whit- 
son. lt-6* 



FOR SALE — 1946 Pontiac Station 
Wagon, perfect condition. Call 
Walton 542. Wilson Case. 4t-4 



FOR SALE— Young male hog. $35. 
for sale, Boys Suit, size 14, also 
Phone Ind. 6869. lt-5* 



WANTED— Housekeeper, woman 25 
to 35 years old. Phone" Walton 
352. " " . 2t-5 



Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued On Page 6) ■> 

FOR SALE— .Registered Angus bull, 
18 months old. Call Walton 276. 
R. L. Slayback, Walton. 2t-5 

FOR SALE— 5-rm. house, lot, Beaver' 
Lick, short distance from Highway 
42; bus service to city every hour? 
school hus at door; convenient to 
churches, grocery; electricity; wa- 
ter in kitchen ; screens, storm sash. 
Henry B. Sleet. 2t-5* 

SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if ordered 
now! For prices and information, 
call A. R. Kwozalla, Erlanger, Ky., 
Route 4. Phone Florence 593. tf-49 



USCn EBBS 



l^^ffMMMHHHMrlK 



We are here to serve you with 

USED CARS and EXPERT REPAIRING 

By Your "Friendly Dealer" . . . 

Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 



Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. ^004 



**» 



Also Cooking, 
35 Water Heating 

and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, KY. 



* r 



I 



e* 



J 






Walt 




— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY — BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



~T^intinty 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1950 



James T. Cheeseman 
Killed Early Sunday 



Volume 35 — Number 7 



In Auto Accident 
Near Nicholson— 



Armstrong-Schadler 

Miss Geneva Armstrong of Inde- 
pendence, was united in marriage to 
Mr. Mason Schadler, Saturday, Feb- 
James" Thomas Cheeseman, a 31- ruary 11th at the home of Rev. R. F. 
year-old truck driver of Walton, was ' De Moisey in Walton. Mrs. Schadler 
tm^ i.»*'._*i., «- i o j i ^ tne daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Har- 

miwhifaJ ?J^L? U ? da y m « r "-lley Armstrong, and Mr. Schadler is 

Krzr? ^ Khhe the s ° n ° f ,Mr - and Mrs - Gus ^ nad - 

tTTn^lw^ f ift £ r^™'. ler of Walton - Route *• They were 
Nih^rH^i^fh th f Walton- laooompanied „ Mr and Mrs y How . 

S£2?^t!r Ut ^' mdle i ard Folmer - M«. Folmer is a sister 
from Nicholson, Kenton County po- ! of the bride 

lice reported. ' | " 

Their many friends wish them a 



Mrs. Tressa Riffe, Kenton County, 
coroner, said 
* of a.*<a»shed 

■ juries. 9Ke added that he*wa> pmrf 
ed beneath the machine, with his 
head pressed /between the body of 
the car and one of the doors. 

The driver of the automobile* 
Cheeseman was trying to pass, Rob- 
ert Bell, 17, of 1225 Banklick St., Cov- 
ington, was said by police to have 
been cited on a technical charge of 
manslaughter. 



id that Cheeseman dta*. Ion gJ"« d ' ha PPy llfe togeth er - 
>d skull and internal in-*- " fe*,» : . 

Inree Horence Men 
Arrested On Charge 
Of Breaking-Entering 



Farm Bureau Kick-Off Meet 

Twenty Boone County Farm Bu- 
reau directors from each of the ten 
communities and a large group of 
volunteer workers will hold a kick- 
off membership drive meeting at the 
Burlington school, Monday, Feb. 20 
at 8.00 p. m. 

Farmers all over the country are 
fast seeing the need for a farm or- 
ganization and Farm Bureau is by 
far the largest farm organization in 
the nation and able to command the 
attention of lawmakers and officials 
in getting things done for the inter- 
est of agriculture. By the end of 
1950 there is expected to be 1,500,000 
Farm Bureau members in the na- 
tion; 65,000 in Kentucky, and 1,000 
Farm Bureau members in Boone co- 
unty. A big majority of Boone co- 
unty farmers will be contracted dur- 
ing this membership drive. 



Walton Cagers Win Two, Have 
Best Win Record in N. Ky., 18-3 



Pillow Slip Bingo Tonight 

A committee composed of Mrs. 
Owen Martin, Mrs. R. B. Taylor and 
Mrs. Joseph Martin, serving under 
the Auxiliary president, Mrs. Lewis 
Houston, are in charge of the month- 
ly Pillow Slip Bingo social to be giv- 
en at the Fire Hall and Community 



Officers Club Formed 

Officers of Fiskburg Chapter, O. E. 
S., met at the home of their Worthy 
Matron, Mrs. Zella Steeley, on the 
Moffett Road, on Tuesday evening, 
February 7th, for the purpose of or- 
ganizing an Officers Club. 



Three Home Games 
Left On Schedule 




Two Boone county robberies were 
The coroner said that three other solved this week, with the arrest of 
w££2 ™°L • Cheeseman car three young men by Boone County 

OhfnT r -J e u OU , S iniu Z ieS : ° ne - Sheriff Wendell Easton. 
Charles C. Richardson, 28, of Burl- ^ *«.*•<„.....,,, 
ington, a cousin of the driver, re-L One of the trio Sheriff Easton said, 
ceived a cut over his eye. The other had confessed t0 



two passengers, Gene Marksberry, 
18, and Roland Marksberry, 17, of 
near Crittenden, were unhurt. 

Cheeseman is survived by his 
widow, Mrs. Grace Morris Cheese- 
man; a son, James Cheeseman, Jr., 
and a daughter, Jo Ann Cheeseman; 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice R. 
Cheeseman, Walton; four brothers, 



the burglary of 
the Calvin Cress International Har- 
vester Store near Burlington on Feb. 
4th. He registered, according to 
Mr. Easton, as Norman Stephens, 19, 
of Florence, and is being held in the 
Burlington Jail under $2,000 bond on 
a charge of breaking and entering. 
It will be recalled that the break 
in at the International-Harvester 



urg OES to Meet 

w&urg Chapter, 334, Order or 
Eastern Star, will hold its regular 
monthly meeting Saturday evening, 
February 18 at the Wilmington Ma- 
sonic Lodge. Mrs. Zella Steeley, 
Worthy Matron, and Walter Rhodes, 
Worthy Patron, will preside. All O. 
E. S. members are invited to attend. 
There will also be a Valentine party. 



Large Auction Held 



By defeating Burlington and He- 
bron the past .week the Walton- 
Mrs. Grace Carlisle was elected Verona Bearcats have latchedonto 
Center, Florence, on Thursday eve- president; Mrs. Ora Bagby, vice pres- the crown in the Boone County Con- 
ning, February 16 at 8:00 p. m. [ident; Mrs. Ruby Flyrin, secretary, ference for this season, and also 
There will be a free game at 8:00 and Mrs - Wilma Hillman, treasurer, have the best win and lost record of 



John, Robert, Morris and Ray Cheese- stQre resulte d in the theft of $344 in 
man, and three sisters, Mrs. Kenneth ' addition to « $20 toaster and an 
Collins and Misses Helen and Tillie electric ,ron Vprth $12. 
Cheeseman, all of this county. The two other men arrested were 

The Rev. Burton Garrett officiated said ' b y Sheriff Easton to have ad- 
at funeral services Tuesday after- 1 m toted robbing a camp near Rabbit 
noon at 2 o'clock in the Walton Bap- 1 Hasr » belonging to George Betz of 
tist Church. Burial was in the In- Covington 



dependence Cemetery 

Chambers & Grubbs funeral home, 
Walton, was in charge of arrange- 
ments. . 



Meeting 



Red Cross 
At Florence On 
February 22 



"On Wednesday. evening, February 
22nd, the Boone County Chapter of 
American Red Gross and the Florence! tne 



P. T. A. will join in sponsoring a 
jitney supper and an evening of en- 
tertainment. This event will take 
the place of the dinner ihejd annually 
by the Red Cross. 

A short business meeting at 6:30 
will be followed by the supper at 
7:00 p. m. Immediately after sup- 
per an interesting. and entertaining 
program will be presented. 

E. E. Newman, Lockmaster at Dam 
38, will give an address, "What Red 
Cross Has Done On the Ohio River 
During Floods." Music will include 
numbers by the choir of the Burl- 
ington Baptist Church, a group from 
Florence, instrumental numbers and 
a vocal trio, Mary Presser, Vera D. 
Scott and Howard D. Bloss, pupils of 
Dean Bloss. 

Mr. Newman is 1950 Fund Chair- 
man for the annual Red Cross Fund 
Drive, which opens March 1st. He 
will announce precinct chairmen in 
a later issue of the Advertiser. Rev. 
Roy Johnson of Burlington, is chair- 
man of church activities, and min- 
isters of the county will participate. 

Plan now to enjoy a good supper 
and assist the Florence P. T. A. in 
their efforts on behalf of the school. 
Enjoy the program following. Your 
only cost will be your evening meal 
and you will be lending your sup- 
port to two worthy organizations. 



The Rices Have A Son 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward R. Rice (the 
former Goldie Robbins) are receiv- 
ing congratulations on the arrival 
of a 6-lb., 5-oz. son at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Monday, FefcJMTMs was 
a birthday present for Mre, Rice, 
February 6 being her bkrttedate also. 

The little one has been^wetfnea 
Ward Richard. Both mother and eon 
are doing nicely. 

The maternal grandparents -are 
Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Robbins of Flor- 
ence, and the paternal grandfather 
is M. B. Rice of Picacho, Ariz. 



The men are charged with break- 
ing and entering and like Stephens, 
are being held in Burlington Jail 
under $2,000 bond for the April term 
of Boone County Circuit Court. They 
were listed by the sheriff as Kenny 
Bradshaw, 22, and Jess Miller, 30, 
both of Florence. 

Sheriff Easton added that both had 
confessed after questioning by Win. 
P. McEvoy, Boone County Attorney. 
Deputy Sheriff Byron Kinman of 
Boone County and State Troopers 
Robert Gordan and Renaker Miller 
participated in the arrests. 

No clues of any kind were left in 
International - Harvester store 



One of the largest crowds to at- 
tend an auction around here for a 
long time was present at the All- 
nutt and Cox sale at Independence, 
last Saturday. Everything brought 
a good price. The sale was conduct- 
ed by theHarry F. Johnson Auction 
Co., who wishes to thank everyone 
coming out and making this sale 
a success. 



Baptist WMS to Meet 

The W. M. S. of the Walton Bap- 
tist Church will meet at the church 
at 11 o'clock Thursday, Fee. 16 for 
the regular meeting. A Missionary 
is expected to speak in the afternoon. 
Bring a covered dish. 



p. m. and during the course of the 
evening two special cover-all games 
will be featured with attractive 
prizes. There will be 30 straight 
"v-~, *Sm«ua£ith hand embroider*; 
>.. — ^*case8Pas prizes. Members of 
the Florence Volunteer Firemen will 
be on hand to serve refreshments. 
The social is being sponsored by the 
Ladies Auxiliary of the Florence 
Volunteer Firemen and is being giv- 
en for the Community Center build- 
ing fund. A very special invitation 
is extended to the people of this area 
to attend. 



Walton Literary Club 
Phoenix Hotel 



PTA Meeting Friday 

The Walton E.-T. A. will meet on 
Friday, February 17th at 3:00 p. m. * the Crippled Children's Fund. The 
the school building. Founders 



Mrs. Lotta Powers entertained at 
the Phoenix Hotel, Walton, Wednes- 
day afternoon, February 1, for a 
much enjoyed meeting of the Wal- 
ton Woman's Literary Club. While 
in business session, presided over by 
the president, Mrs. Wendell Rouse, 
the club voted to make contribution 



any team in Northern Kentucky, 
which include wins over Hazard, 
Bellevue, Simon-Kenton, Beechwbod 
and a 1- point loss to Owingsville, 
which is rated 6th } vdcTty.-- ■ 

The locals went to Burlington last 
Friday, and without the services of 
Dike Vest, who was injured during 
practice last Thursday, found the 
going a bit rough— working against 
a wne defense. However, the" locals 
were in front all the way, leading at 
the first quarter 11-9; at the half 
24-19; third quarter 42-86, and as 
the gong sounded 51-49. Johnny 
Maddox topped Walton scorers with 
17 points, and Cleek and Cheeseman 
added 15 each. 

Walton -Verona 



in 

Day will be observed with a special 
program. Refreshments will be serv- 
ed. All members are urged to be 
present. 

...- 1 ' o 

Baptist YWA to Meet 

The Walton Baptist Y. W. A. will 
meet at the church Monday night at 
7:30 for the study of a Mission book 
entitled, "Buried-Living." Mrs. Ed 
Hankinson, will be the teacher. This 
study precedes the Week of Prayer 
for Home Missions and all members 
are urged to be present. 



scored its fifth 



Verona Community Club to Meet 
Monday; Movies, Guest Speakers 



members were pleased to add to victory without a defeat in the Boone 
their roll the name of Mrs. J. J. Mar- County Conference by downing the 
9ha11 - - Hebron Cardinals, 43-33, ..Tuesday 

The importance of reading the i night at Hebron. 



burglary, but Sheriff Easton heard 
a report that a large amount of 
change had been scattered on the 
road in an automobile accident, the. 
same night, near Pleasure Isle on 
Madison Pike, Kenton County. 

A bag full of nickels had been 
stolen in the International -Harvester 
burglary and Sheriff Easton quietly 
made some inquiries. He observed 
also that the story of the wreck had 
not been reported to Kenton County 
Police. 

All the threads of evidence, the 
Sheriff said, pointed to Stephens, 
who was recognized as he returned 
to the scene of the accident to pick 
up some of the money scattered on 
the highway. 

Of the proceeds of the robbery a- 
bout $70 in cash together with the 
toaster and the electric iron were 
recovered. A shotgun was recovered 
in the Rabbit Hash robbery, though 
several oases of beer, a pony jacket 
and some field glasses have not 
not been located. 



M. J. Belew to Address 
NFLA Annual Meeting 

M. J. Belew, farmer and educator, 
will speak at the annual meeting p£ 
the Williamstown National Fawn 
Loan Association, according to Carl 
Sheriff, secretary-treasurer. Mr. Be- 
lew will talk on "Giants In the 
Land." » 

The meeting will be held in the 
Courthouse at WiUiamstown, begin- 
ning at 1:00 o'clock, fast time, on 
Thursday afternoon, Feb. 23rd. * 

Dividend checks will be distribut- 
ed to members at the meeting. Two 
directors will be elected to succeed 
Chris H. Beck, Kenton County, and 
A. J. MoNees, Pendleton County, 
whose terms expire. 

Upon adjournment of the meeting, 
refreshments will be served. The 
public is Invited. 



The Verona Community Club will 
meet Monday, February 20 at eight 
o'clock in the Verona school build 
ing and. urges all members to be» 
present. Also they are asked to 
bring anyone interested in wild life 
conservation, as there will be wild 
life movies shown by a representa- 
tive of the Snorts Afield magazine. 
In addition to the wild life movies 
the program will feature guest 
speakers from the Fifth District Fed- 
eration of Sportsmen. Club mem- 
bers will also hear Dr. Boltz, game 
Commissioner from this district*and 
Clarence Craig, Vice PresidentJi the 
League of Kentucky SppiGmen. 
Stanley Shelton, Dist$i<ft Supervisor, 
will represent the State Wild Life 
Conservation Department, and John 
Murphy, President of the Fifth Dis- 
trict Federation of Kentucky Sports- 
me», will be making bis first ap- 
pearance at the Community Qlub, 
and along with the rest of the speak- 
ers mentioned, will be glad to meet 
personally all of the club members 
who can possibly attend. ,* 

Club House Project 

Other important business expect- 
ed to come up at this meeting will 
be of great interest to persons liv- 
ing in this community regardless of 
whether they are club members or 
not. For some time several club 
members have been discussing ways 
and means of building a club house. 
At the last meeting considerable in- 
terest was shown in the possibility 
of building a type.of club house just 
across from the school building that 
would also serve as a gymnasium 
for the Verona Grade School. At 
present they have no play room dur- 
ing inclement weather. The small 
space used'fdr that purpose in years 
gone by is npw used as a lunchroom. 
A physical -education program for 
grade- school children, is cnsidered 
highly tonportarif by all leading. ed- 
ucational- authorities. The present 
facilities at the Verona school will 
not permit much In the way of sup- 
ervised physical education, other 
than outdoor activities when the 
weather permits. By the time a boy 
graduates from .the eighth grade at 
Verona and enters High School at 
Walton, he should be well on His way 
towaird mastering some of the fun- 
damentals of basketball, if he is ex- 
pected to compete on even terms 
with boys of his own age. Lacking 
this much needed experience gained 
in supervised grade school physical 
(Continued on Page 7) 



Visalia PTA to Observe 

Founders' Day, Feb. 20th 

The Visalia P. T. A. will observe 
Founders' Day with a special pro- 
gram and tea, Monday night, Feb. 
20 at 8:00 p. m. 

Mrs. Harry Figgins, Jr. is program 
chairman. She has planned a page- 
ant, "P. T. A. ..Oornerstones." Mrs. 
Thomas McClure, music chairman, 
has planned special songs and mu- 
sic built around the Founders' Day 
theme. Mrs. Charles Reimer is the 
chairman of the tea, which will fol- 
low presentation of gifts to past 
presidents of the Visalia PTA. 

One of the highlights of the eve- 
ning will be the History of the Vi- 
salia P. T. A., which will be given 
byWm. Damon, who was a teacher 
in the one-room school in which the 
P. T. A. was first organized. Mem- 
bership has grown to 232 members. 
The fine group of teachers have co- 
operated 100% with the P. T. A. 

Everyone in the community is 
cordially invited to attend this and 
all the meetings. 



Bible and of church loyalty were 
stressed in the program' for the af- 
ternoon, which had for its leader, 
Mrs. C. F. Blankenbeker. The Spirit- 
ual Guidance was given by Mrs. J. 
C. Bedinger, who prefaced her talk 
with a prayer by the Rev. Don Hop- 
kins. Mis. Bedinger gave a very 
helpful talk, emphasizing the com- 
fort and courage derived from Bible 
reading. "What Are Our Churches 
Coming To?" was the topic of an 
excellent talk given by Mrs. C. F. 
Blankenbeker, 



The Bearcats were held to a 11-10 
margin in the first period, but spurt- 
ed to a 32-19 lead at half-time. The 
third period was a defensive affair, 
with the winners scoring six points, 
While the losers got four, for a per- 
iod score of 29-23. In the final per- 
iod the Cats outscored the Cardinals 
14-10. 

Walton also copped the prelimi- 
nary contest by downing Hebron's 
reserves 28-22. 



She presented the | Walto^ (43) FG 

guest speaker, the Rev. Don Hopkins, ! Rice .2 3 

pastor of the Richwood and Union { Meadows ~ 2 

Presbyterian Churches, who gave a! Johnson <l ~_Z~ 3 

very inspiring talk on the subject Maddox "__" 2. 

for the afternoon, "Bible Study and Cheeseman __ _" 2 

Church Affiliation." . J Cleek "_~ 4 

Following adjournment, Mrs. Totals "_~~~ 16 

Louis Schwab, the gracious hostess _ . 

at the Phoenix, served attractive re- Hebren (33) FG 

fresbments of cherry pie, ice cream ' Herbstr «it _ 1 



Verona Homemakers 

Mrs. Ethel Foogs entertained the 
Verona Homemakers, February 10 
for an all -day meeting. The meet- 
ing was called to order by the pres- 
ident, Mrs. Florence Florence. A 
scripture reading was gften by Mrs. 
Lillian Stephenson, program chair- 
man. Mts. Fooks and Mrs. McCor- 
mac gave the second lesson on Hat 
Making. 

Our new demonstration agent was 
present in the afternoon. We feel 
like she will be a great help to iis. 

Sixteen members and'three visit- 
ors were present: Mrs. Grace Ren- 
aker, Lizzie Noel, Lena Harris, 
PierolCna Kannady, Frances Mc- 
Cormac, Pearl Lamn, Geraddine Har- 
ris, Becky Rushing, Lillian Stephen- 
son, Florence Florence, Marie Chap- 
man, Ura Roberts, Arsola Hayden, 
Edith Hamilton, Ethel Fooks, Ethel 
Fooks, and Mrs. H. C. Mills; Pattie 
Waller and Carrie Sturgeon, visitors. 
—Pub. Chm. 



and coffee 

Guests present were Mrs. J. M. 
Jack, Mrs. Etta McManlma, Mrs. 
Owen Liskey and the Rev. Don Hop- 
kins. Members responding to roll 
call were Mrs. E. B. Wallace, Mrs. D. 
Hess Vest, Mrs. Sam B. Sleet, Mrs. W. 
D. Scroggln, Mrs. Wendell W. Rouse, 
Mrs. W. O. Rouse, Mrs. Grover C. 
Ransom, Mrs. C. W. Ransder, Mrs. 
John Myers, Miss Emma Jane Miller, 
Mrs. Clayton Jones, Mrs. J. L. Hamil- 
ton, Mrs. Wallace K. Grubbs, Mrs. 
Alan H. Gaines, Mrs. E. E. Fry, Mrs 
Barnette W. Franks, Mrs. Leo Flynn, 
Mrs. J. R. Conrad, Mrs. C. Scott 
Chambers, Mrs. C. F. Blankenbeker, 
Mis. J. C. Bedinger and the hostess, 
Mrs. Lotta Powers. 

The March meeting will be held in 
the home of Mrs. C. S. Chambers. 



FT 


TP 


3 


9 


3 


7 


1 


7 


2 


6 





4 


2 


10 


11 


43 


FT 


TP 


2 


4 


0- 


2 


4 


10 


1 


3 





4 





10 


7 


33 



McGlasson t-^ 1 

Bowman 3 

Tanner 1 

Abdon 2 

Hogan 5 

Totals 13 

Officials: Witschger and Bass 

Three More Games — All at Rome 

The Cats have three more basket- 
ball gaimes before the District tour- 
nament and they are at home. Fri- 
day night they play Florence; Tues- 
day night, Crittenden, and next Fri- 
day (Feb. 24) New Haven. 

To Name Basketball King- Queen 

Friday night at the Florence 
game here, Sue Messmer, who has 
already been named as Basketball 
Queen, will pick a Basketball King 
from among the squad. 



Interest Shown In Many Parts Of 
County Over Historical Society 



WALTON FISHING CLUB 

The Walton Fishing Club held 
their annual organization meeting 
this Wednesday night at the Phoe- 
nix Hotel. Approximately forty 
members and guests enjoyed the 
food and program. 



Last week an article was printed 
suggesting that there was sufficient 
interest in the history and folklore 
of Boone county to justify the for- 
mation of a Boone County Historical 
Society. 

Reports during the past week in- 
dicate that there is interest in many 
parts of the county and a number of 
persons have indicated their inten- 
tion to attend the meeting at the 
Florence Town Hall, Friday, Feb. 17 
at 8:00 p. m. 

One gentleman tells that his fam- 
ily has tired of hearing his stories 
of the glorious past and that he 
plans to be present in hope that 
someone will be willing to listen to 
him. 

These stories are the history of 
Boone cunty. They are being lost 
and before long we will know noth- 
ing of the pioneers who fought, bled, 
and died in carving our ihomes out 
of the wilderness. 

It is reported that there is a Wins- 
ton graveyard in the county and 
that these Winstons are connected 
with Winston Churchill's family. 
This report should be investigated, 
the graveyard located and the facts 
recorded. 

A Geologist from Cincinnati has 



offered to come out some time to 
talk to the group about the geologic 
history of the area and of the ani- 
mals living here before the glacial 
invasion. 

Do you know about Hangman's 
Tree? Do you have any copies of 
old Boone county newspapers? Be 
present at the meeting Friday. You 
will enjoy the evening. L 

Coiffure Wins Again 

Miss Mary Yealey, manager of the 
Artistic Beauty Shoppe, won first 
prize again for the most stylish coif- 
fure at the Guild Hair Stylist Show 
in Columbus, Ohio. This is Miss 
Yealey's fourth first prize in suc- 
cession, having won the Ohio, Ken- 
tucky and Indiana State Shows, and 
the Guild. 

Masonic Meet Feb. 23 

The 'regular meeting of .Walton 
Lodge, No. 719, F. & A. M., will be 
held on Thursday, February 23 in 
the Masonic Hall. All members are 
urgently requested to be present as 
plans will have to be completed for 
the District meeting to he held here 
March 24th in the Walton High 
School gym. 



■HnH ■: -<'--' 



riSsiii 




Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 16, J 950 



c 



WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 



Entered as Second Class Matter 

January 1, 1916 at the Post 

Office at Walton, ky. 



Mark M. Meadows 

Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

$1.50 PER TEAR 

(In Advance) * 



MEMBER 

KENTUCKY PRES! 
AS SOCIATION , 

OKCMIUD JiSUAUr. (Ill 



C^ 



FLORENCE NEWS 



Mr: and Mrs. Edward Sanford and I The community wishes to welcome 
son Mark have returned from a two- the latest newcomers to Valley View 
weeks vacation trip to Orangeburg, ; Subdivision. We welcome Mr. and 



Unfortunately Mrs. Maggie Glack- 
en has geen suffering from the ef- 
fects of a fall at her home about 10 dav evening, Feb. 18 



S. C, where they were guests of Mrs 
Sanford's parents. 

William L. Oliver, who has been 
confined in St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
Covington for the past three weeks, 
| returned to his home on Route 42, 
Saturday. His many friends are de- 
I lighted to know he is well on the 
I road to recovery. 

Mr. and- Mrs. Gustav Gebhaid and 
, daughter, Nancy Jane, of Forest Ave., 
j Erlanger, were the Saturday after - 
| noon guests of Mrs. Zelma Aylor and 
daughter, Cynthia Anne. 

Don't forget the Pillow Slip Bingo 
Social at the Fire Hall on Thursday 
[evening, February 16, 1950 at 8:00 
! p. m., given by the Ladies Auxiliary 
of the Florence Volunteer Fire De- 
partment for the benefit of the build- 
ing fund. 

Larry Aylor, local musician and 
; singer, was the guest artist on Wed- 
nesday evening of the St. Henry 
Parent-Teachers Association, . Erlan- 
ger, for a special Founders Day pro- 
gram, presenting a group of songs 
and piano numbers. 

Rev. Herbert J. Egbring, pastor of 
St. Henry Church, Erlanger,, extends 
a special invitation to the general 
public to attend the Pre -Lenten Soc- 
ial given at the church haill Satur- 



days ago. 
the best. 



However, we all wish her 



— .. 



, ... ■ 'rw 



L. J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

and 

OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 053$ 



Office Hours . . . 
» 9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Mrs. Dorothy Kinsler has returned 
to her home on Park Avenue follow- 
ing a ret... ^ ^wJ^dt'St. Eliz- 
abeth Hot, -^-CoVington. Her fri- 
ends wish her a speedy recovery. 

Little Stephen Crisiler, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Carlton Crisler of Park 



Mrs. Raymond House and family. 

Miss Glen (Marie Tanner, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Irvin Tanner, became the 
bride of Perry Garner Renaker, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Renaker, all of 
Florence, in a very impressive cere 
mony by Rev. Herman Andres aat 
Hopeful church, January 27 at 7:00 
p. <m. The attendants were Miss Ros- 
ella Renaker, sister of the groom, and 
Mr. Renaker Miller, cousin of the 
groom. The bride was attired in rose 
crepe accentuated with a corsage of 
white rosebuds and wine accessories. 
Her attendant wore aqua crepe with 
black accessories and a white hat. 
Her corsage was of American Beau- 
ty roses. The groom and his attend- 
ant were appropriately dressed for 
the occasion and wore white car- 
nations. Following the ceremony 
the bridal party repaired to the Ca- 
bana, Erlanger for their reception. 
Mr. dnd Mrs. Renaker are residing 
in Florence. We join in wishing 
them health, happiness and pros- 
perity as they go down the pathway 
of life together. 

The Boone County Garden Club 
will meet at the home.-of Mrs. Roy 
Lutes, Shelby St., Florence, on Tues- 
day, February 21. William Davis is 
to be guest speaker, his subject be- 
ing, "Soil Testing and Treatment." 
Every«member should bring a, small 
amount of so.n *w- r^Jiejt^arden for 
analysis-. ?***- - '•■*•'*' 

-Mrs. Ida Hunter, 77, of South Fort 
Mitchell, suffered a fractured hip 
bone when knocked down by a run- 
ning boy near her home Friday 



Avenue, celebrated his first birth- night. Mrs. Hunter had gone out to 
day Sunday. buy an Tee cream cone and was re- 



**&£&■ 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Yards 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market In the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to us. Why 
not now? *• 

Reference: Ask the first 
man you meet 



We, the Undersigned, have contracted with Tanner Bros, to sell at public auction at 
the property known as the Dr. Sininger farm, 3 miles South of Florence and 2 miles 
North of Union, Ky., on U. S. 42. This sale is being held because Floyd Sininger is 
discontinuing farming. 

Sat., Feb. 18 10 a.m. 

27— HEAD DAIRY CATTLE— 27 

3-year-old Holstein cow with calf by side; 7-year-old Holstein co wwith calf by 
Side; 4-year-old Holstein cow, heavy milker; 8-year-old Holstein cow, to be fresh by 
day of sale; 4-year-old Guernsey cow, heavy springer; 5-year-old Guernsey cow, 
giving good flow of milk; 4-year-old Jersey cow, giving good flow of milk; 5-year- 
old Jersey cow, calf by side; 3 5-year-old Jersey cows, giving good flow of milk; 5- 
year-old Jersey cow, heavy springer; 8-year-old Jersey cow giving good flow of milk ; 
6-year-old Jersey cow, heavy milker; 2-year-old Holstein heifer; 3 1 8-months-old 
Guernsey heifers; 2-year-old Red heifer; 2 1 8-months-old Jersey heifers; 4 10- 
months-old Jersey and Guernsey heifers; 2-year-old Guernsey bull; 1 -year-old Jer- 
sey steer. 

28 HEAD HOGS— 5 fat hogs, 350-400 lbs. ; sow, 400 lbs. ; 22 shoats, 80-1 00 lbs. 

FARMING TOOLS — 2-horse corn planter with fertilizer attachment ; *| cut-off 
saw; DeLaval milking machine with 2 units; 2 50-gal. oH drums ;*2 14-gal. oil drums; 
2 oil drum pumps ; many small tools of all kinds. 

FEED — Ton mixed hay, baled; some corn and wheat. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE — 6-burner table-top oil stove ; 2 coal ranges; living 
roomsuite; dining room suite; kitchen, cabinet ; studio couch; coal heating stove; 
Heatrola; laundry stove; lot of chairs*. (linoleum rugs; several window screens; lot 
of fruit jars; many more articles too numerous to mention. 

Terms Made Known Day of Sale Lunch Served by Gunpowder Homemakers 



r & Sii 



f, Owners 



Tanner Bros., Auctioneers 



CHAS. M. TANNER 
Phone Florence (Ky.) 728 



DAVID L. TANNER 
Phone Walton (Ky.) 155 



turning home when the accident oc- 
curred at Dixie Highway and Orph- 
anage <Road. She was thrown from 
the walk onto the road. Her condi- 
tion was reported as fair at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital. 

Mrs. Hobe Roberts and son Terry 
of Limaburg Road were the evening 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Car- 
penter, Monday. 

Information received by- Mr. and 
Mrs. Clyde , Arnold from his father, 
Walter Arnold, states that he arriv- 
ed safely in Florida, is catching 
plenty of fifih and having a good 

time. 

i 

Charles Goodridge and wife and 
their son and family, formerly of 
Latonia, are now occupying their 
new brick home near Tanner's Lane, 
on Burlington Road. Mr. Goodridge 
is retired after many years service 
with the Greenline Co. We welcome 
them to the community. 

We are glad to report that Tom 
Easton is improving following a 
siege of illness. His friends hope to 
see him out soon. 

Mrs. Roy C. Nestor was hostess to 
thirty -six hoys and girls with a party 
on Sunday honoring the eighth bir- 
thday of her daughter, Virginia 
Royale. Games were played and 
technicolor moving pictures shown 
followed by refreshments of ice 
cream, cake and fruit punch. Hav- 
ing enjoyed a very pleasant after- 
noon, the guests departed wishing 
Virginia Royale many more happy 
birthdays. 

The ladies of the Florence Christ- 
ian Church are observing Brother- 
hood Day, p ' 1 *fy,F«h»,24 at p:30 p. 
m., at the Florence v Jhfcfty Cen- 
ter and Fire H'anr HevT Barton A. 
Johnson, pastor of the Madison Ave. 
Christian Church, Covington, will be 
the guest speaker. Come out, enjoy 
a social hour of fellowship and help 
a good cause. A complete dinner 
will be served, including chicken pie 
vegetables and homemade pie. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Carpenter 
were guests Sunday'of their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. R. G. Keyer, and Mr. Keyer 
of Latonia. Mrs. Keyer is convalesc- 
ing from an attack of bronchitis. 

Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie Rose of Florence, underwent 
an appendectomy in a Dayton (Ky.) 
hospital Thursday of last week. His 
friends wish him a hasty recovery. 

The Women's Society of the Flor 
ence Methodist Church held their 
regular meeting at the church Feb 
7th at 1:30 p. m. The session was 
opened with ptayer by Mrs. Harry 
Daugherty. Mrs. Paul Chaney, the 
president, conducted the business 
period, during which reports were 
heard from various officers. The 
program by Mrs. C. N. Ogg and Mrs. 
Ohaney was preceded by the Invo- 
cation by Mrs. A. T. Knox. Songs 
included were, "The Kingdom of 
God," and "The Church's One Foun- 
dation." The meeting was dismiss- 
ed with a circle of prayer. Attending 
were Mesdames C. N. Ogg, Ella 
Bethel, Hazel Knox, Allie Markes- 
bery, Pearl Baker, Eva Miller, Ida 
Miller, Helen Bethel, Marie Thomp- 
son, Betty J. McCormick, Christine 
Pollitt, Harry Daugherty, Martha J 
Daugherty, C. A. McKibben, Nannie 
Mitchell, Naomi Chaney, Lura Den- 
ham, Leila Allen, Sam Denham and 
Misses Mary A. Markesbery and 
Paula D. Ogg. 



Vigo wheat, a variety well suited 
to Todd county, was sowed by 80 
farmers there last fall. 

R. D. Wilborn Of Oldham county is 
setting out on the contour 10 acres 
of apple and peach trees. 

Less than 10 percent of all farm 
homes in McLean county have tele- 
phones, and two large communities 
have none at all. 



DIAMOND 
VALUE . . . 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and 
admiration. 

Come to Motch's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced in strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
ence in this one loca- 
tion is your assurance 
af getting dollar for 
dollar value, in your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 

Monthly Payments 1 



M GTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON. KENTUCKY 



/ 



MORRIS DlvPT. STORE 

SPECIALS THIS WEEK 

Reg. 3.98 Ladies' Sweaters, slipovers, 100% girgin wool, 

assorted colors and sizes . NOW $1.77 

Reg. 2.98 Flannel Gowns, '... Special $1.77 

Reg. 3.98 & 2.98 Dresses, "Happy Home" NOW $2.37 

Reg. 89c Girls' Slips, cotton ...... NOW 47c 

Reg. 1.98 Children's Dresses, asst. patterns Z. NOW 57c 
Reg. 2.98 Men's Covert Pants, sanf., "Big Yank" $1.97 
Reg. 2.98 Men's Flannel Shirts, sanf., "Big Yank" $1.77 

Reg. 1.89 Boys' Shirts .,... NOW 97c 

Reg. 3.98 Boys' Slacks, pleated, zipper ______ NOW $2.77 

ONE TABLE OF MERCHANDISE 
Slightly Soiled - Values up to 98c, NOW 

5c - 10c - 17c 



You get more quality for your money when 
you buy "STAR BRAND." "POLL PARROTT" 
and "ENDICOTT JOHNSON" shoes. We sell 
better shoes at lower prices. Compare the 
quality and price of our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. P. F. Gym Shoes. 

—WE FIT BY X-RAY— 



Morris Dept* Store 

"The House of Ouctfity" — Your Money's Worth or Meney Back 

, FJU^^^g^* KENTUCKY 




TELEVISION 

General Electric, Philco and Emerson 

10" screen $159.95 

12y 2 " screen L $199.95 & Up 

Complete line of G. E. and Youngstown Cabinets and 
Sinks; Fairbanks-Morse Water Pumps; Gas and Electric 
Ranges; G. E. and Philco Rerf rigerators ; also one Used 
Electric Range, cheap; 1 Used Maytag Washer ^heap. 
EASY TERMS! 

R. W. Gross Appliances 



Phone Ind. 5111 



Independence, Ky. 



Maytag! $24.95 

For Your Old Washer, Regardless of Make or Condition 
No Down Payment — 1 Year to Pay 

Ofcourseyoucan 
affod a /Mcujtaiil 




Now— a genuine Maytag at these easy-on-the-budget prices I 
Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
faction with the rugged, dependable Maytag! 

Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
onstration. 





THE MAYTAO CHIEFTAIN. A tan- 
nine Maytag, yet priced within ■ 
flawdollaraof theloweat- ^__ _-_ 
coat waahara on tha $19,195 
market. I*»"f— 



THE MAYTAO COMMANDER 

Big, aquara poroalafci tab. Gyra- 
foam action waahaa tm _ 
axtra faat. eitra >J44_ 



HAGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 



I 




Thursday, February 16, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Three 



w-' 




WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m . 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

. Frank Penlck, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship ii:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowslhiip 6:45 p. rn. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 

ST. PATRICK CHURCH, VERONA 

Rev. Hdnry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a. m. 
2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
3rd Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a. m. 
4th ..«"—* "«t. month __ 10:00 a. m. 
5th Sui.-H^jrof month 8:30 a. m. 

ALL SAINTS MISSION. WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
4th Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a. rfl. 
5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 
— Services Every Sunday — 

INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 

NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 
S. Webster, Pastor ■ 
Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 

CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Walter Kidwell, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 

CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor — Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt.— Harvey Hughes 

Sunday School ,. 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 
J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(First and Third Sundays) 

FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School • /UkOQ.fL m. 

Morning Worsu. „. V <*.n*H£ m. 
Christian Endeavor ___± 6:30 p. m. 
Evening Worship 1_ 7:30 p. m. 

SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
15 Don Smith, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service __: 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 

RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 
Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m. 

LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On *Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 

BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 

jit 

VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Bab Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Services 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. ,_ 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting; Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Rcry 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



♦ 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 




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FIRST FEDERAL BBSs' 

501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINGTON. KY. 




SCRIPTUHE Acts 15:1-39; Oalatlns 3. 
DEVOTIONAL READING: John 8:31- 



Fight for Freedom 



Lesson for February 19, 1950. 




Dr. Foreman 



•THERE ARE TWO KINDS of 

• problems with living things. 
One is the kind of problem caused 
by its growing too fast; the other 
is the problem caused by not grow- 
ing fast enough. The early church 
had mostly the first kind of prob- 
lem, at anv rate it was taking in a 
lot of m e\n bers 
whom the older 
Christians found 
strange. At first 
all Christians had 
been Jews; no one 
thought of anything 
else. But in Anti- 
och, as we have 
seen, and even 
more as the church 
spread westward 
around the edge of the Mediter- 
ranean, the Christian 
filling up with non-wvr.. 
bers, just as they are today. 

It is no secret that in the Mason- 
ic order there are 33 degrees. It 
is not possible for a new member 
to be taken right into the 33rd de- 
gree the first night. Everybody has 
to go through the lower degrees 
which are called the Blue Lodge. 
Now many persons in that early 
church thought of the Jewish faith 
as a sort of Christian Blue Lodge. 
All ' the very earliest Chris- 
tians had been members of 
that lodge; why shouldn't every 
one else be the same? So when 
Paul and Barnabas came back 
from that historic missionary 
tour of Cyprus and points 
north, telling about the large 
number of new Christians, 
these old-style Christians shook 
their heads. 

Paul was by-passing the Blue 
Lodge; he was taking in members 
who had not gone through the prop- 
er preliminaries, the first degrees. 
» • • 

What Makes a Man 
A Christian? 

pAUL KNEW a real Christian 

* when * he saw one. So did 
Barnabas. And the two of them 
knew, right down in their .souls, 
that they had seen real conver- 
sions, genuine cases of persons 
corning out of pagan darkness into 
Christian light, without being Jews 
at all, even for five seconds. 

The vital question was simply 
this: What makes a Christian? The 
old-style Christians, who had been 
Jews themselves and still were, 
for all their Christian faith, said: 
Unless you are circumcized and 
keep all the laws of Moses, you 
cannot be saved — you cannot even 
begin to be a Christian. Paul and 
Barnabas — not alone, but as spokes- 
man for many others in the church 
—said: You are saved by faith. 

The Jerusalem Christian said: 
Yes, you are saved by faith, AND 
by keeping the law of Moses. Paul 

said: you are saved by faith, period. 

• • • 

How They Settled It 
•PHE WAY that problem was 
A settled is a model for all 
Christian churches with problems 
on their hands. First of all, the 
argument was brought out into the 
open; it was not a whispering cam- 
paign. Second, it was settled after 
giving both sides plenty of oppor- 
tunity for full discussion in public. 
Third, it was settled not informally 
but by a church council, a group of 
representative leaders, not by a 
simple majority vote of all church 
members indiscriminately. Fourth, 
it was settled (ad the reader of Acts 
15 may see) by appeals to fact and 
to Scripture. 

Finally, once the leaders had 
made op their minds, the 
church at large accepted their 
decision promptly, without fur- 
ther bickering. This has been 
the pattern for the Christian 
church ever since, though alas! 
it has not always been followed. 
There would have been fewer 
church splits if the example of the 
early church had been more ser- 
iously taken. 

• • • 

Faith and Obedience 

ESSENTIALLY, that first great 
*»• church council decided on the 
side of Paul and Barnabas. But 
they did not throw the Old Testa- 
ment overboard. The moral law 
was as good as it ever was. But 
the council showed, once and for 
all, the true relations between 
Christian faith and obedience to 
the law of God. 

There is Just one doorway to 
the Father's house, the door- 
way of faith. We do not have to 
keep the law of Moses, or any 
set of laws, first We are 
saved BY obedience. _ 

We are not saved FROM obedi- 
ence. But we are saved FOR obe- 
dience. A Christian's obedience to 
God is not a way of earning God's 
good-will. It is a grateful response 
to God's grace. And that makes all 
the difference in the world 



NEW BETHEL BAPTIST, VERONA 

Rev. R. F. DeMoisey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School •_ 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

— ^Services Every Sunday — 



WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Gxover F. Tymer, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMillian, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. m. 



Prices 
all can 
af f ord ! 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School , 10:00 a. rn. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Worship , i 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-Bible Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 



STAFFORDSBURG CHURCH 

Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School ; 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship _ 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m. 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 
Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 a. m. 

Worship Service _— 10:30 a. m. 



the Facilities, 
the Experience, 
and the Ability 
to give the 
Finest in funeral 
service! 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

FUNERAL HOMES 

Walton, Ky. Florence, Ky. 

Phone 352 Phone 193 



• 




For A Rainy Day! 

Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as little as $1.00! 

Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KY. 



THE BEST PLAG& * 
to 



EAT 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 



. 



DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 



i^IUO^SmJ 




The fellow who can roar the loudest and 
bite the hardest usually gets what h« wants. 

That's the way it is in the animal kingdom, 
and sometimes the system creeps into man's 
world too! 

Most of us have too much rtligious aware- 
ness to believe that such a system is the best 
one. We would rather live in a world in which 
kindness and peace and unselfishness were the 
rule. 

Our Churches can help us build such a 
world. They can turn our religious awareness 
into spiritual growth. 

On Sunday morning; the man in the arm. 
chair knows just as well as the man in the 
pew what is wrong with the world. But the 
man in the pew will be busy doing something 
about iti 



domocrocy nor JSmSfc n * ith,r 
•urrly.. h™» **£«*■ can 
r^aon, wh • «■» four K>und 

For hi, ow _ ~°- ] «»y or«: /j> 
J* hi. community i!/° r ,he "*• 

which n££ IV***?"* lb.ll 
'• riaI »up Wr , ta p£ n ral . «" mo- 
church r^Uorfy iS «• 00 to 
Blbl. daily. 7 <md *•*» your 

ST**- - .SttW***^ Vara*. 

Jf «><»•*.. t.,i«h • IMS 



' y '':¥>: vVXBdfc..-. 



Linton's Barber Shop 

Walton, Kentucky 

Florence Deposit Bank 

Florence, Kentucky 

Hamilton and Jones 

Walton, Kentucky 

Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence, Kentucky 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 
Phone Walton 95 



lOnprrlfht 1850. E. B. Kelittr. Btruburt . V. I 

._ Conrad Hardware 

For Service, Large or Small, See Powers 
t 

Dixie State Bank 
Walton, Kentucky 

Meador's Grocery 

Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables, Meats 

Walton & Readnour 
Coal - Feed • Seed Phone Walton 154 

Roberts Grocery 

Where Tou Get Quality and Price 

Community Public Service Co., Inc. 
Walton. Kentucky 



1 






& 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 16, 1950* 



BABY CHICKS 

$13.50 per 100 

Licensed and Approved by Kentucky Department of Agriculture 



OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 
WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 
POULTRY LITTER - REMEDIES 

TUXEDO FEEDS 

Garden Seed - Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 





KENTUCKY 
,n WASHINGTON 




Kentuckians would have been 
proud the other day to see the head 
table at the dinner given President 
Truman by the Washington Radio 
Correspondents Association. Ken- 
tuckians had places of honor right 
next to the chief executive. 

Seated at the side of the President 
was the second citizen of. the land, 
Vice President Barkley., On the other 
-^' -*~r:- *-~^^(mke Vinson of 
Louisa. -^t^Tsy was Justice Stanley 
Reed of Maysville. And acting as 
host was 'Bill McAndrew, formerly of 
Covington, who is soon to be elected 
president of the correspondent's as- 
sociation. 
Hope vs. Barkley 

Bob Hope was the master of cere- 
monies during the entertainment 
and he and the Vice President kept 
the audience in an uproar with their 
exchanges. Hope told the crowd 
that he knew the Vice President was 
still in love because he had seen 
him smile at a Republican. 

A little later, Hope introduced a 
magician who promptly pulled a 
rabbit out of a hat. 



EXTERIOR & INTERIOR 

PAINTING 

Paper Hanging 

Also Steaming Off Wallpaper 

LUKE BROS. 

Phone: JUniper 4084 
or Independence 6329 



"I had a call this afternoon from 
the Republican National Commit- 
tee," the magician announced. "They 
want me to pull an elephant out oif 
a hole." 
..Barkley vs. Wherry 

Senator Wherry, Republican leader 
in the Senate, also exchanged .barbs 
with the Veep. But the Vice Presi- 
dent scdred when he ;&#!.".. .-^tffcftry 
about a Kentucky . "j^3| 

an old clock to a. friend. 

The farmer told the purchaser that 
when the hands of the clock point to 
twelve and it strikes two, it is really 
half past four. 

"And that," said the Vice Presi- 
dent, "illustrates how confused the 
opposition can get." 

Others There 

A lot of other Kentuckians were 
on hand. There was Colonel Wil- 
liam Aribogast of Ludlow, an AP 
newshound; 'Rep. Tom Underwood 
of Lexington; Paul Porter of Win- 
chester; Happy Chandler, Emery 
Frazier of Whitesburg, clerk of the 
Senate; William Vaughn of Glas- 
gow, aide to the Veep; Victor Sholis 
of WHAS, (Morgan Beatty, formerly 
of Danville; Julian Goodman, an 
NBC newsman whose home is in 
Glasgow, and Joseph Callahan of 
Bellevue, Sergeant at Aarms of the 
Lower House. 



ROAD CONFERENCE 
T OBE HELD AT UK 

A statewide conference of all per- 
sons interested dn the construction 
mid maintenance of roads and streets 
will be Iheld at the University of 
Kentucky, March 2 and 3, under aus 
pices of the U. K. College of Engin 
earing and the Kentucky Department 



WILL HOOP DREAM 




L 



Dreams can be so beautiful — and seem so real. Then 
suddenly, with a puff, they're gone. " 

BUT your dream of some day owning a farm debt- 
free need not be a vision which disappears — you can 
make it a reality! 

Get a firm, secure hold on your future — on the farm 
you've dreamed of owning outright — by financing it 
through your local National Farm Loan Association, 
with a Federal Land Bank Loan. 

A Federal Land Bank Loan gives you all these worth- 
while advantages: 

# A low interest rate . . . only 4% , 

# Long-term ... up to 40 years, 

# Small semi-annual payments, 

# No appraisal fees, * 

# No renewal commissions, 

9 No penalty on PRE-payments, » 

# Leniency in .times of stress, 

# Cooperative ownership of your source of credit. 

Call, Write or See 

CARL SHERIFF, Secretary-Treasurer 

Willlamstown & Boone County National Farm Loan Association 

WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. PHONE 2861 



-Vv 



■ 



of Highways. Purpose of the confer- 
ence, inaugurated last year by the 
sponsoring organizations, is to bring 
together state, county and city en- 
gineers and officials, contractors and 
others interested in highway and 
city street construction. The pro- 
gram features addresses by authori- 
ties in every phase of design, con- 
struction and maintenance. 

Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



L 



GLENCOE 



J. D. Sutherland is some better at 
this time. 

• Mr. and (Mrs. George Poland" en- 
tertained Monday night the Brother- 
hood, men of the Baptist Church. All 
had a very nice evening of fellow- 
ship together. 

Two Bibles were given away Sun- 



day at the Church of Christ for the nice home there soon, 
one brought the most to Sunday j curtley Dorman has made nice 
school. Mrs. Lottie Poland and improvements in his home here. 
Affable Groves each received a Bible. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Noel and 
Paul attended the show at the Dewey 
Pettit place, Williamstown, Friday, 
and enjoyed it very much. A large 
crowd was present. 

Work is still progressing on the 
new bridge. 

, Clifford Crouch has bought a lot 
over near Warsaw and will build a 



Have you seen 

the FARMALL 

painted white, with 

red wheels and gold stars? 



87-ACRE TRACTOR FARM 

2 6-Koom 2-Story Frame Homes 
Cows, Heifers, Tools, Equipment 

At ABSOLUTE AUCTION 

M„_' - V:«»» V*. KENTON COUNTY 

Orning VieW, IXy. On Decoursey Pike, State Route 177 • 

Saturday, February 18 - 10 A. M. 

REASON FOR SELLING — Mrs. (Catherine Maloney Dwyer, the owner, having purchased a home in the city, 
and is quitting the farm business, has signed a contract to sell this property at Absolute Auction on the above 
date — regardless of price or weather. This farm has always been considered one of the best in Kenton County, 
Mrs. Dwyer's late husband being a very prosperous farmer. It's close to grocery, parochial and ' protestant 
schools, on bus line, and school bus at door. Nine-tenths acre tobacco base. 

TRACT No. 1 — 6-room, two-story frome house built in 1932, in perfect condition, with 1 acre of ground, shop 
and feed room, 2-story chicken house, nice level garden site already fenced in. The house has built-in cabinets 
and double drain steel sink, Venetian blinds, new roof, and good water supply. 

TRAC TNo. 2 — 6-room two-story frome home with basement, front and back porch, and 2 wells; milk house, 
corn crib, dairy barn with 1 2 cow stanchions, large tobacco and implement barn close to house, and a fine lake 
stocked with fish ; all fenced and cross fenced. 

TRACT No. 3 — 40 acres of level tractor land on the east side of Decoursey Pike, which runs to the river ; ideal 
for camp cottages, camp sites or it's a fine building site.Real estate to be sold promptly at 1 :00 p. m. 
The right will be reserved to group any two or all parcels *. 

FARM TOOLS — Case tractor, model VC, 1 940 with power take-off, with 2 cultivators ; Case breawing plow 
with double 12-in. cut; Case power mower, 7-ft. cut, like new; Roger McLean disc, 6-ft. cut; McCormick-Deer- 
ing, model R, green crop and hay loader, like new, used 2 years; hay rake, Osborn, 10-ft, ; International manure 
spreader; silage cutter, Bizzard; 30 ft. outside pipe and distributors; 6-in. tractor belt, 50 ft. long; Hammer 
mill, Sears Roebuck, like new; rubber tired farm wagon with tractor and horse hitch, box bed and hay frame; 
McCormick horse mower; horse jumper plow; 3-shovel Rastus plow; double shovel plow; Jim Brown woven 
wire stretchers with chains; barb wire stretchers; General Electric milk coloer ; 2 can size Rite- Way electric milk- 
er; 1-3 h. p. motor with I single Rite- Way unit; McCormick single unit; 6 ten-gallon milk cans, buckets, strain- 
ers; 2 wash vats; 2 washing Curlator milk cooler; 2 55-gallon oil drums with faucets; 2, wheelbarrows; 1 drill 
press; about 262 pocust fence posts, TYzh.; 1800 tobacco, sticks; posthole digger, pitchforks, hoes, etc. 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS — Breakfast set, table, 4 chairs; drop-leaf table; 3-4 bed, springs and mattress; antique 
bureau; sewing machine; phonograph and records; 9x12 enameled rug; ice box; kitchen cabinet; washing ma- 
chine, electric; fuel oil heater, heats 4-5 rooms; 2-burner oil heater; iron kettle; 10-gal. jar; power lawn mower, 
like new; lawn swing and chairs; oil brooder stove, brood up to 400 chicks; water fountain, feeders, all kinds. 

FEED — 1 75 bushels of good corn; loose hay in barn, to be sold by ton. 

STOCK — 79 large type English White Leghorns, young; black mare, 8 years old, soundl, good worker; bay 
mare, 1 2 years old, good liner; 10 head milk cows and heifers, Hereford bull — Cows, (1)8 years old, open; (2) 
7 years old, witlh calf by side; (3) 4 years old, just bred; (4) 3 years old, heavy springer; (5-6-7-8-9-10) young 
heifers, 2 already bred; Hereford bull, 18 months old, good stock. , 

— Lunch will be served on the grounds by the ladies of the St. Mary's Church — * 

At the Opening Sale — A FAT PIG to be given away to the Lucky Ticket 
Holder— ALSO A TELEVISION SET — FREE 



Frank Miller and the Kentucky Fiddlers of Radio Station WZIP 



Rel C. Wayman & Sons 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION BROKERS 



REAL ESTA 
'623 Washington Street, Covington, Kentucky 
Auctioneer — Cecil Wayman, JUniper 4895 

Want Action! Then Why Not Auction It! 



& AUCTION BROKERS 

Phones: HEmlock 5107; Independence 5064 
Clerk & Cashier — R. S. "Buck" Wayman, Ind. 6457 
Call HEmlock 5107 Now! 



■I 



Massfe 



^^BflH 



^i 



Thursday, February 16, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 



I 



Square Dance 

Sponsored By 
VERONA COMMUNITY CLUB 

Fri., Feb. 17 



th< 



Walton Legion Hall 



LITTLE SOUTH FORK 



] 



Mrs. Eliza Scudder Is spending a 
few days with Mr. and Mrs. Bea 
Scudder. 

Bonnie Baker and Shirley Sutton 
attended the basketball game at 
Gallatin County High School, Friday 
night. The Wildcats defeated the 
New Haven Tigers. 

Mr-, and Mrs. Ben Stahl and son 
Wayne of Indiana, spent Sunday 



with (Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Stahl and 
daughter. 

Dorothy Boots spent one night re- 
cently with Mr. and Mrs. Leonard 
Lawson and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baker and 
sons called on Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Baker and daughters, Thursday nite. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Sutton called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Bea Scudder, Mrs. 
Eliza Scudder, Saturday night 

Joe Scudder spent Saturday night 
with Mr. and Mrs. Rea Scudder and 
Mrs. Eliza Scudder. 



— with- 



Jarvey Hall & Green Valley Boys 



-PRIZES TO BE GIVEN- 




Farms For Sale 



41 ACRES — Located on TJ. S. highway, close to Florence; 6 rooms 
and bath, washroom of first floor, hot air furnace with automatic 
control, inlaid linoleum throughout the house, modern kitchen, 
double bowl cabinet sink, also Cedar-lined closets, full base- 
ment, 50-igallon electric hot water heater, fruiUbin, storm win- 
dows and screens, closed-in back porch and large front porch, 
double garage with living quarters, milk house; dairy barn with 
14 stanchions, running water, individual drinking fountains, 
20x20 feed room, also calving barn, modern chicken house, 12x30, 
hog house, meat house, two large cisterns, lake stocked with 
fish, also creek, electric in all buildings with separate fuse boxes, 
9/10 acre tobacco base; this farm is well fenced with woven wire 
and cross fenced, and is a rich bluegrass farm; you have heard 
of a farm in town, it's hard to get one any closer this this; ideally 
located, bus service; this is a dream farm of Boone county; has 
beautiful road frontage; it's almost impossible to describe this 
and do it justice; price $25,000. 

114 ACRES — Located 9 miles from Florence on State highway; 7- 
room house and bath, full basement, hot air furnace, drive-in 
garage, house newly decorated, has two cisterns, Jarge combin- 
ation barn, also plenty of nice outbuildings, large lake stocked 
with f ish, has a fine orchard, tobacco base 1.6, plenty of hay, some 
alfalfa, has almost a mile of valuable road frontage; this land 
is in a high state of cultivation, in bluegrass, clover and some 
wheat; price $22,000. 

200 ACRES— 9 miles from Walton, 1 mile off State highway on a 
good hard road, extra good 6-room house, stock barn, large to- 
bacco barn racked off, double garage, corn crib, smoke house, 
14 acres alfalfa, 14 acres new clover, 40 acres mixed hay, 12 acres 
wheat, 2 lakes and creek, 3 springs, 1 cistern, 1 well, tobacco 
base 4.7 acres, plenty of tractor land; this farm has been well 
cared for, has always been in good hands; if you want some- 
thing for an investment you would never go wrong with this; 
rented for 1950 to reliable man; purchaser to receive one-half of 
proceeds; you couldnt put the buildings on it for what you could 
buy it for — price $18,000. 

80 ACRES — 13 miles from town; 6-room house, barn, tool shed, 4 
other uotbuildings, tobacco base 8/10 acres, all in grass— $7,500. 

64 ACRES — Near Walton; 7-room house, combination barn with 12 
stanchions, milk house, shipping Grade A milk, plenty of other 
outbuildings, will sell farm alone or sell stock and tractor equip- 
. ment and all tools. 

104 ACRES — 5-Toom house, combination barn with 10 stanchions, 
milk house, electric; this is a good hill farm, will grow bluegrass; 
* pi»jce $8,500. 

78 ACRES — Near Independence; 4-room house, barn, chicken house, 
price $7,500. 

WALTON — 4 rooms and bath, garage, lot 60x150, city water, hot 

and cold; selling to settle estate; price $4,200. 
I NEED a lot of new farm listings, have about sold out. Have 

plenty of buyers. Call me and we'll get the job done. 

R. P.* COLEMAN 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION SALES '"• 

FLORENCE, KY. HIGHWAY 42 PHONE FLORENCE 148 



II 



FERTILIZER 

Your Co-op atDevon has 7 cars of Fertilizer on hand — 
6-8-6, 4-12-8 and 5-10-10, all superphosphate potash 
tobacco fertilizer ; 3-12-12 and 4- 1 2-8 regular and amonia 
nitrate, 20% superphosphate and 34% Florida rock 
phosphate. Better order now. Fertilizer will be very 
scarce. , . : . 

Plenty of fence, metal posts, gates and farm machinery 
on hand. 

Bi-County Farm Bureau Co-op 

iVON, KY. PHONE FLORENCE 4606 



Tractor Tires 

REPAIRED and FILLED with SOLUTION 

t - 

We are now equipped to do expert 
Tractor Repairing and Filling. 

CALL WALTON 38 

B-M SALES & SERVICE 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 



For Sale - In Walton 

Six-room house, 1 acre, in Walton, one square off Dixie 
Highway; 4 rooms down, finished, 2 rooms up, partly 
finished, street, water; immediate possession; $3,500. 

W. D. Johnson 

Beaver Grade, Walton, Ky. Phone Walton 203 







FARMAU-— TIME-PROVEP FOR IMPROVED FARMING- 

Butler Bros. 

Phone Ind. 5053 Nicholson, Ky. 




Lawrence county poultryrnen axe 
using with success an electric de- 
beaker on their flocks where can- 
nibalism is a problem. 



DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At . 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

6 1 3 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday. 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



Seven-Eleven Farm and Equipment 

Saturday, Feb. 18, 1950 



2:00 P. M. 



On Premises 



148-acre Farm on Hogriffe Road, off Bristow Road, Kenton County, Large Lake and 
Modern Buildings. Equipment includes: " 

- Farmall "H" Tractor; Manure Spread-er; Corn Planter; Plows; Mower; Harrow 
s; Hay Rake; Corn Shelter; other miscellaneous items too numerous to mention. 

TERMS: Farm, $100.00 Cash Deposit, Balance 4 - 8 - 12 JMonths; 
Personal Property, Cash! •* 9 

John L. Cushing 

Master Commisioner Kenton Circuit Court 



Electric Appliance 

AUCTION 

As I am discontinuing the electrical business, all articles listed below will be sold at 
Absolute Auction, in order to make room for a complete line of Inlaid Linoleum and 
Cabinets for Kitchens. This store has been operating under the name of Walton 
Appliance Store, but as of now it will be known as Dixie Linoleum. 



WALTON, KY. 

Sat., Feb. 18 



1:00 
p.m. 



NEW— Duo-Therm and Florence Oil Heater; Zenith Radios, table models; 
Waffle Irons; Electric Hand Sweeper; Desk Lamp; Silex Coffee Maker; Clocks of 
different kinds; Sun Lamps; Westinghouse Irons; Steam Iron; small Chrome Oven 
for oil stove; Thermo Broiler; Bucket Warmer; Gibson Home Freezer, 8 cu. ft.; 
Marvel Deep Freeze, 1 2 cu. ft. ; number of new Fans, window and circulator type. 

USED — Deep Freeze, 5 cu. ft. ; a number of used-Radios, Irons and other small 
articles ; 2 floor model Television sets ; 6 or 7 used Washers, all overhauled ; approx- 
imately 1 dozen used Refrigerators; Gas Stove. 

0. J. STRUVE 

Harry Johnson, Auct. 



\ 



■ 



r 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



I 



GRRNT 

VIUIAMSTOWN.K'y 



MS 2020 



SATURDAY ONLY ^ FEB. 18 

2 ACTION HITS 2 

hit no. 1 

RED RYDER— in 

"ROLL THUNDER ROLL" 

hit no. 2 
JIGGS & MAGGIE— in 
"JACKPOT JITTERS" 




Thursday, February 16, 1950 



2 DAYS . 




STARTING SUNDAY 



TMCHiii 



TUE. & WED. 



FEB. 21 - 22 



BURT PAUl 



LANCASTER HENREIO i 

ClAUDE ffTFH 1U** 



RAINS LORRE 

* HAL WAILIS 



L^t 






SAM IAFFE 
CORINMCUW? 



THUR. & FRL :: FEB. 23-24 

2 BIG HITS 2 

—Hit No. 1— 

MILTON BERLE— in 

"ALWAYS LEAVE 

THEM LAUGHING" 

—Hit No. 2— 

CHARLES STARRET-^n 

"DESERT VIGILANTE" 



On the Stage In Person 



/"■ "j^. -*s"^? . 




at ouf 



• -'*?*& 



■o* 



>*■ •- > "*- ; - 



FAMILY PARTY 



One of the Biggest and Best 

Entertainment Program^ 

we have ever presented 

FEATURING STARS OF STAGE & RADIO FAME 

. . . Chester Rotrofi, Master of Ceremonies; Red Dicker- 
son, the Ail-American Nitwit; Mary and Jerry Ledford, 
the Hi-Jinks on Rollers; Higgins & Hayes, Fools for 
Fun ; Lucky Joy, Master Mind of the Piano Accordion ! 

Don't Miss This Terrific Program — Clean and Lively 

No Sales *Talk . . . Just Entertainment! 
Bring the Whole Family! 

THURSDAY, FEB. 23 

% Beginning at 8:00 P. M. 

BURLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Burlington, Kentucky 

CALVIN CRESS & SONS 

"Your International Harvester Dealer" 
PHONE 79 BURLINGTON, KY. 



Public Sale 

Having sold my farm through the Harry F. Johnson 
Auction Co. and going into the grocery business^ I will 
sell by Tools, Stock, etc. 

1 MILE NORTH OF MORNING VIEW, KY. 

Sat., Feb. 25™ 

Team of good horses and harness ; 3 Holstein heifers, 
1 year old ; bull, 8 months old ; 1 948 Ford tractor, plows, 
harrow, cultivator, side mower, pullies, belt, saw, jack, 
chains, weed spray all tractor tools; silo cutter; 2-horse 
corn planter; new sled; iron wheel wagon; hay bed; 
John Deere mower on rubber; 60-tooth harrow; hillside 
plow; Rastus plow; hay rake; hoes, forks, and all kinds 
of small tools; 3,500 tobacco sticks; some loose lumber; 
milk vat and heater; 10 ten-gallon cans; dining room 
suite, 9-piece, almost newt 2 beds and springs ; sausage 
mill; glass churn; good coal range; girl's bicycle; new 
door; 3 tons baled soybeans; tobacco press; some earn, 
and other -items too numerous to mentioji. 



-<*■ 




innell 



Owner — Phone Ind. 6899 

HARRY F. JOHNSON 

Real Estate & Auction Sales — Phone Ind. 6196 
CARL JUSTICE, Clerk 



Quality Plumbing Fixtures 
MAKE YOUR BATHROOM 
MODERN 

Truly modern, efficient homes demand 
the best in plumbing, and healing. Bur 
American-Standard Plumbing Fixtures 
and be sure of the best. . . maki rour bith 
and powder room distinctive, a room like 
the one shown here, that you can point to 
with pride. The superb Master Pembroke 
Bath, quiet Master One-Piece Water 
Closet and convenient Companion Lava- 
tory assure rears of lasting satisfaction. 
See these beautiful units today ... in 
tastroos white or your choice of • wide 
variety of lovely colon. 




Let Us Help You Build or Remodel ...Get Pull Details Now 

We also handle American-Standard Heeling Bcmipment, for all fuels, for 
radiator and warm air systems, for every six* home. We will be glad to inspect 
your present heating and plumbing installations, end help you plan complete 
room modernization or replacement of single units, without cost or obligation. 
You can pay for modernization out of income with our convenient finance plan. 
Complete sales and installation service. Come in ... or call . . . today. 

A. & M. SUPPLY CO. 

106 East Fourth Street Covington, Ky. 

Phone— JUniper 3500 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

MflNFV corp. 

r.*** ^** * * 427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 




Mrs. Bill Duchemin and daughters 
of Portsmouth, Ohio, visited relatives 

here last week. J -T 

Mrs. J. T. Stone and ■***-- '''.jSt 
Flynn attended th: ' I ^^Jtmkm 
Homemakers Club meeting last 
Thursday at the home of Mrs. Wm. 
House, McKim Drive, Independence. 
James Day and daughter, Mrs. 
Betty ShaTon and baby of Coving- 
ton*were Saturday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Herbert Day. 

Mrs. John H. Vest of Verona Road, 
is now staying with her daughter, 
Mrs. Andrew Jarman, Mr- Jarman 
and son. .' . 

Nora Bickers of Walton and Mal- 
colm Caswell of Cynthiana were 
married in Cynthiana, Feb. 4th, and 
will reside in Covington. 

Mrs. Amos Pennington and son of 
St. Augustine, Pla., are visiting rel- 
atives 'here. Mrs. Levi Pennington 
accompanied them to Dayton, Ohio, 
Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Breeden, Sr. 
entertained Sunday for Elmer Bree- 
den and Mr. and Mrs. William 
Breeden, Jr. and daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Wynn visited 
her brother and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Francis West of Covington, over the 
weekend. 

Mts. Mabel Johnson and daugh- 
ters visited relatives in Burlington 
over the weekend. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Cook, Jr. 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Obie Cook in Carrol lton. 

Mr. anw Mrs. Donald Austin of 
Columbus, Ohio spent several days 
with Mrs. Austin's sisters and their 
families: Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Breeden and Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Praither and sons. 

Mrs. R. F. DeMoisey has been con- 
fined to her 'bed since last Thursday. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richaid Ryan are 
now located in the Mrs. Grace Knox 
apartment. 

Mrs. Rickman Powers is ill at her 
home on Dudley Pike. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Eckler spent 
one day Qast week with Mr. and Mrs. 
Levi Pennington. 

Bobby Wood and Dennis Flynn 
spent Sunday with David and Lee 
Flynn. 

Mts. Clyde Chipman of near Or- 
lando, Fla., is here visiting her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Reamy Simpson. 
Mrs. Simpson had been a patient in 
St. Elizabeth Hospital since Friday. 
Lynn Kathryn Harp, daughter of 
Mrs. Evabel Harp, and Ernie Mc- 
Loney, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
McLoney, are confined to their 
homes with scarlet fever. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Reffett are re- 
joicing over the arrival of a new 
granddaughter, born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Will White of Erlanger. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Ferguson and 
son, Norman, have moved from Ve- 
rona, to the McDonald farm on Step- 
henson Mill Road. They spent a 
night last week with Mr. and Mrs. 
Levi Pennington. 

Mrs. Ed Mann of near Covington, 
was the Tuesday night guest of her 
mother, Mrs. Abbie Bush, and dau- 
ghters, Ora an*i Linda. 



Mrs. J. W. Abernathy and sister, 
Mrs. Daisy Parker, were shopping in 
Cincinnati, Friday. » 

ifHrs. *J. T. Stone was the guest 
from Tuesday until Friday oJ h«* 
niece, Mrs. Leo Flynn, and family. 

Mrs. Mary Howe had a quilting 
party at her home Tuesday. Those 
present were Mrs. Clarence Sturgeon, 
Mrs. Sarah Sturgeon, Mrs. Emma 
FUynn of Walton; Mrs. Lottie John- 
son of Crittenden and Mrs. Don Hop- 
kins of Richwood. 

Mrs. Kathryn Simpson entertained 
with a birthday dinner for her two 
children, Phyllis and Johnny. Those 
present were Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Duermit and Mr. and Mrs. William 
Hoffman of Cincinnati, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Simpson. 

Mrs. Nora Paris of Lexington, has 
been visiting her mother, Mrs. Sally 
Day. 

Nelson county's corn plantings 
have been decreased from 46,000 to 
27,000 acres, while the average yield 
has been increased from 23 to 41 
bushels an acre. 



LET US SHOW VOU HOW 
TO GET WORK POWER 
OUT OF HORSE POWER 




WITH THF FARM ALL SI/PER A 



• WE WILL SHOW YOU RIGHT 
ON YOUR OWN FARM. 

• WE WILL SHOW YOU ON ANY 
JOB YOU WANT TO DO. 

• CALL US TODAY FOR A 
FREE DEMONSTRATION. 

FARMALL-PROVED POWER FOR IMPROVED FARMING 



CALVIN CRESS & SONS 



BURLINGTON, KY. 



PHONE 79 




*fow/ A FULLY-AUTOMATIC 




When The Crash 

Comes — Be 

Protected 

Pjfj$%tfufomobih 

p-r^&tutual Insurance 
^^r Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON, KY. 



'**Z*> 




• TIMES ITSELF 

e SHUTS OFF WHEN 
COFFEE IS DONE 

• KEEPS COFFEE HOT 
-INDEFINITELY 

Once you plug in the automatic Flavo- 
Perk, you needn't give it a second 
thought. It starts perking in less than 
a minute. When your coffee is done it 
shuts off — automatically. Then the 
heat comes back on — again automat- 
ically — and keeps the coffee at the right serving temperature — in- 
definitely. No watching or timing. Makes 6 to 8 cups of delicious 
full-flavored coffee. Smartly designed in extra-heavy aluminum 
with easy-pour spout. Complete with appliance cord. 



PER MONTH 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

INCOHPORATID 

Ifou* #*ie*uUu2Uohic Company 



"Thursday, February 16, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



I 



I 



Hopewell Circle Meets 



Mrs. Anna Mae Bu9h, Mrs. Lula 
Hume, Mrs. Martha Thompson, Mrs. 
The Gladys Hopewell Circle of the, gaily Day, Mrs. Gaynelle Flynn, 
Walton Baptist Church met In the M rs. Alice Flynn, Mrs. Anna Lancas- 
ihome of Mrs. William Breeden, Jr., ' ter, Mrs. June Neumeister , Miss 
on February 9th. The theme of the I Alicia Neumeister, Mrs. Mary Finer, 
program was "How Christian Is 'Catherine Simpson, Mrs. Irene Bick- 
America?" | ers> y^^ Lillian Gohs. Visitors 

Those present were: Visitors, Jane present were: Mrs. J. H. Stephenson 



Independence 



Johnson, Roberta Duchemin and 
Brenda Duchemin; Y. W. A. group, 
Peggy Vest, Zella Simpson, Alva 
Flynn, Nina Easton, Billy Jones, PAt- 
ty Johnson, Lillian Strause, Mary- 
land Colston; Mrs. Garrett, Linda 
Breeden, Jimmy Pennington, Clara 
Roberts; members, Gloria Penning- 
' ton, Violet Pralther, Helen Breeden, 
Lucittie Neumeister, Margaret Wil- 
son, Dora Pennington, Maude Smith, 
Juanita Struve, Helen Chance, Nell 
Hunt, Georgia Greene, June Neu- 
meister, Ethel Breeden, and the host- 
ess, Eloise Breeden. 



Walton Homemakers 

j2 The Walton Homemakers' Club 
MSiet with Mrs. William Breedn, Jr., 
list Friday. During the business 
session, conducted by the president, 
Mrs. Leo Flynn, a very interesting 
report was given by Mrs. (Matthew 
Flynn on Farm and Home Week. 
Thirty members answered roll call 
by giving the name of one of our 
past presidents. The second lesson 
on Trimming Hats was given and 
about ten hats were made by the 
ladies— after this interesting lesson 
it 1s no trouble to have a new East- 
r er bonnet. - 

The following mewvbo~ < " ***Kffia \ H 
.;*" attendance: M*s !*■• ..^iwrsTOro 
Stone, Mrs. Mayfrie Simpson, Mrs. 
Bonnie Woods, Mrs. Margaret Wood, 
Mrs. Wilma Winburn, Mrs. Marie 
Penick, Mrs. Daisy Jack, Mrs. Louise 
Rouse, Mrs. Carrie Rouse, Mrs. Maxy 
Stephenson, Mrs. Lula Hudson, Miss 
Jean Chambers, Miss Marie Chamb- 
ers, Mrs. Pearl Bedinger, Mrs. Anna 
Pearl Gaines, Mrs. Bertha Fisher, 



of Carrollton; Mrs. Nora Paris of 
Lexington, and Mrs. John Goodpas- 

ter. 

I 

Ryland Homemakers 

"Abraham Lincoln," was the topic 
chosen by members of the Ryland 
Homemakers Club during the read- 
ing lessen when the club convened 
recently in the home of Mrs. J. A. 
Rich. Various biographies, poems 
and readings were submitted of this 
great emancipator. Mrs. O. J. Wil- 
liams was the chairman. * 

The supplementary program was 
on the seven basic foods and a dis- 
cussion on vitamins and their val- 
ues was conducted 'by the president, 
Mrs. William Damon. She also urg- 
ed all members to attend the special 
workshop day on refinishing furni- 
ture to be held at her home Tuesday, 
February 14th.» 

Mrs. R. B. Frakes, clothing leader, 
advised the grpup that "It's the wise 
woman who starts planning early for 
any seasons wordrobe." 

Recreation was in charge of Mrs. 
J. A. 'Rich. Attending the February 
meeting were: Mesdames R. C. For- 
nash, O. J. Williams, Oliver Gee, 
W. H. Bagby, R. B. Frakes, Shelby 
Martin, F. B. Herrries7Wir<~ 
mon, John iMurchlsony :>L 
and N. Leadh. 

Mrs. Oliver Gee of Belmont Place 
will be hostess to the group for the 
March meeting. 



Mrs. John E. Tungate has been in 
the hospital, but is now home. 

It isreported that W. E. Sims will 
have to be in the hospital about five 
weeks longer. 

Sandford Lee Roberts is reported 
not doing so well. He was unable 
to return to the doctor the other day. 

Mrs. Chas. Glass is in poor health. 

Johnny Workman's 2-year-old son 
threw kerosene, on the stove and 
was burned about the face. 

F. Sanders has had an unusual 
case of shingles ,in his eyes since 
Dec. 19th, but is improving. 

February 7th the Bell Telephone 
Company purchased a lot at the 
South edge of Independence from 
Mrs. Cline. The company plans to 
let the contract soon for the erection 
of an office for the installation of 
the aial sustem. This new arrange- 
ment was planned before the wax, 
but was stopped due to shortages of 
materials. 

Independence Baptist Church has 
bought the late- Will Schoborg res- 
idence for a parsonage. The church 
became interested in gathering 
funds for this purpose in 1943. Later 
a committee was appointed to con- 
sider building or buying something 
suitable for present and future re- 
quirements. This home is modern 
with nine rooms. 

John Baird and family moved last 
week to Ironton, near Ashland, Ohio. 
Mr. Baird is overseer at the Maxwell 
Trucking Co. garage at that place. 
•~\f IfcSCummins of Atwood was kicked 
Gibson [by a horse and taken in the fire de- 
partment ambulance Saturday after- 
noon to the hospital. He was kick- 
ed two or three years ago by a horse 
and taken to the hospital. 



Page Seven 



Freeman Chadwell, farmer of 
Rpwan county, stated that any farm- 
er can grow fescue if he uses ferti- 
lizer and makes a proper seed bed. 



frbm the Zfore/s Seaf^ 




t$&fa'$' 



FARMAU-- FIRST IN THE flBLD 

BUTLER BROS. 

Phone Ind/5053 Nicholson, Ky. 



HENRY'S BOOTERY 

SHOES ... For the Entire Family . . . SHOES 

Next to Kroger Super Market - Erlanger, Ky. 



RED GOOSE SHOES 

Men's Work Shoes 




February Specials 

LOT 1 — Ladies' Oxfords and Dress Shoes d»Q 4Q 
values to 7.95 <PJ.4M 

LOT 2— Girls' Oxfords Cl 00 

sizes 4 to 9 $1."" 

LOT 3 — Men's House Slippers ^| qq 

leather bottoms «P !•«/«/ 



SEE 

NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

fftNFY*> CORP. 

1 V *^ Ki * 427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 




Goshen Class Meets 

The Willing Workers Class of the 
Goshen Christian Church held its 
January meeting in the new home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Callen. Mrs. 
Oatney Worthington was in charge 
of the program. 

Those attending were Mr. and Mrs 
William Justice, Mr. and Mrs. Carl 
Justice, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Elliott, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Worthington, 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Beagle, Mrs. Ed- 
na Colston, Mrs. Wm. Reynolds, My- 
ron Stephens, Mr. and Mrs. Johnny 
MdMillian, Diana Elliott, Mr. and 
Mrs. Kenneth Jones, Mrs. Oatney 
Worthington, Ruby and Billy Jus- 
tice, Bonnie and Norma Elliott, Bren- 
da Worthington, Shirley Bell, Mary 
Beagle, Sandra McMillian, Lloyd 
Mullins, Junior Beagle, Sue Gabriel, 
Wayne Hornbeck, Lois Cheesman, 
and the host and hostess. 

The February meeting will be held 
in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie 
Beagle on Friday evening, February 
24 at 8:00 p. m. (Mrs. Woodrow Wor- 
thington will have ohaTge of the pro- 
gram, and Ray Elliott, president, will 
preside. 



Hickory Grove WMS 

The Missionary society of Hickory 
Grove Church met at the home of 
Mrs. Ben Finnell on Tuesday even- 
ing. The meeting was called to or- 
der by the president, Mrs. C. W. Car- 
ter; roll call was answered with a 
scripture verse, and minutes read 
and approved. Devotional was con- 
ducted by Mrs. W. E. Durr. . 

The program was in Royal Service. 
"How Christian Is America?" all 
members taking part. 

Members present: Mrs. C. W. Car- 
ter, Mrs. W, E. Durr, Mrs. H. Fisk, 
Mrs. F. Popp, Mrs. W. H, Su%mey, 
N. Orsburn. Visitors were Rev. 



Mrs. 



N. Orsborn, W 
nell and son 



H. Summey, Ben Fin 



Gunpowder Homemakers 

The theme "Every Woman Can Be 
Beautiful," was indirectly passed on 
to the Gunpowder Homemakers at 
the regular meeting February 7th 
at the home of Mrs. M. B. Shelton, 
by Miss Nancy McClaskey, Home 
Agent. Other reports on the Farm 
amd Home Week followed. 
' At the business meeting, plans 
were made and committees appoint- 
ed for serving lunch at the Sininger 
sale, Feb. 18. 

Following a most enjoyable din- 
ner, served by the hostess, the les- 
son on Hat Making was completed. 
Much interest has been shown in 
this project, with several hats in the 
making and two being completed by 
Mrs. Dolpha Sebree and Mrs. Virgil 
Kelly, leaders. 

Members attending were Mrs. 
George Black, Mrs. Robert Moore, 
Mrs: Dolpha Sebree, Mrs. Edgar Utz- 
inger, Mrs. Elva Piper, Mrs. Clifford 
Norman, Mrs. Virgil Kelly, Mrs. Bert 
MaTksberry, Mrs. Glenn Stevens, 
Mrs. B..M. Stevens, Mr®. Shelton, and 
Miss McClaskey. Two visitors were 
present: Mrs. "Skeezix" Shelton and 
Mrs. Neal Shelton. 



CARD OF THANKS 

The family of Mrs. Sara Finnell 
wish to express their deepest ap- 
preciation for all the kindness shown 
during her illness and death. Es- 
pecially do we wish to thank Rev. 
R. F. DeMoisey and Rev. B. C. Gar- 
rett for their consoling words; Mrs. 
Grace Rice,. Mrs. Bryan Rector and 
Mrs. Kenneth Johnson for their beau- 
tiful songs; Chambers & Grubbs for 
their .efficient service; the pall- 
bearers; the many friends who sent 
flowers, and all those who expressed 
their kindness and sympathy in any 
I way. 

Her Husband, Son and Families 



Verona Club Project 

(Continued from Page One) 

education he soon loses interest in 
trying to make the team because 
he Himself realizes he Is so far be- 
hind the other boys of his own age. 
This will also tend to lessen inter- 
est in the entire school career of 
many boys, and could possibly be 
the basiq reason for dropping out of 
school entirely. 

In the beginning, the Community 
Club did not expect to build a build- 
ing large enough to provide a bas- 
ketball court, however, if a reason- 
able amount of rent "could be paid 
by the school board each year, plus 
what would be donated by the Com- 
munity Club it is entirely possible. 
This proposal will be presented to 
the school board in due time amd 
discussed in detail. Favorable con- 
siderate „has, already been indicat- 
ed by' J!^aI*"bo3t>rt /members in a' 

preliminary ••discu >*jWhuT the 

matter was brought up at their- last 
meeting* ' ■■■- 
Public Invited 

A large crowd is expected to at- 
tend this fine program, as outlined 
above, and the Community Club is 
highly honored in being able to pre- 
sent free of charge, a program of this 
type. The meeting will start prompt- 
ly at eight o'clock, and the public is 
cordially invited. 




Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



JOHN'S 

SNOW CROP FROZEN FOODS 

NO. 2 TOMATOES _ 2 cans 28c 

CENTER CUT PORK CHOPS . !_.. lb. 5 1 c 

NO. 2 Y. B. PORK & BEANS 2 cans 25c 

JELLO — ail flavors 3 f or 27c 

SLICED SHOULDER .. . ■ . -. lb. Abe 

WEEKS SPECIAL— SNOW CROP FISH 

Haddock Fillet lb. Abe 

Cod : ;__ ....... ....... Jb. 39c 

Ocean Perch , 1 . lb. 39 c 

SNOW CROP Concentrated Orange Juice '.... 31c 

Phone Walton 16 - We Deliver 







Good News for Mothers! 




TO THE FIRST 100 MOTHERS 
WHO VISIT OUR STORE 



Generous Supply of 

Playtex 




JBABYOIL 
■< BABY POWDER 
I BABY CR^AM 



Prove to yourself, at our expense, what more than 100 hospitals have reported 
in tests on thousands of new-born infants . . ."Never a case of diaper rash where 
Playtex Antiseptic Baby Preparations are used exclusively!" And where diaper 
rash has already occurred, switching to Playtex will usually clear it up in a 
jiffy. Because only Playtex contains 
Thanium . . . the new, modern anti- 
septic that destroys the bacteria that 
causes diaper rash ! Arid Playtex Baby 
Oil and Cream, are super-rich with 
soothing lanolin. Keeps baby's skin 
smooth and soft. Wonderful for 
Mother's skin too! 

PLAYTEX BABY OIL-79** 

PLAYTEX BABY POWDER-49* * 

PLAYTEX BABY CREAM-79** 




•Add 20% Federal Tu 




All 3 in the „ 
Handy Nursery Pak, 
beautifully gift-packaged $2.49* 



For happy babies 

KOOLEEZ* BABY PANTS 

Made of tree-grown latex, Kooleez Baby Pants stretch 
all over for all over comfort. No seams, no stitches, no 
chafing, no binding. Provide odorless, waterproof pro- 
tection. 10 seconds to rinse fresh, 10 seconds to pat dry! 
Accurately sized by baby's weight. Pink; Blue, White. 69? 

Kopleez Plastikool Baby Pants 
Transparent . . . extra-light . . . extra-cool „ 79tf 



Brakefield's Drug Store 

Walton -:- Kentucky 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 16, 1950 



Used Cars 



For Sale 



1 947 Plymouth Custom 
5 -Passenger Coupe 

1942. Ford 4-Door Sedan 



1939 Plymouth 4-Door 
Sedan with 1946 motor 

,1940 Dodge 4-Door Sedan 



PETTIT'S GARAGE 

INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. 5057 



INDEPENDENCE 



The Willing Workers class of the 
Independence Christian Church held 
its meeting in the basement of the 




Cab:r,w*£ Eirbecue 



Sandwiches 

Home-Made Pie 
Good Coffee 



Route 25 - South Of 

WALTON, KY. 

Roland and "Buster" Glenn 



J 



— new 



ame 



S 



THEATER 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 



FBI. & SAT. 



FEB. 17-18 



Edmund Gwenn - Donald Crisp 

"LASSIE" 

— in — 

CHALLENGE TO LASSIE 

SUN. & MON. «, :: FEB. 19-20 

- Glenn Ford & Janet Leigh 
. -^in — 

THE DOCTOR AND 
' THE GIRL 

TUE. & WED. :: FEB. 21-22 

Marguerite nK " — ~-^and 

;^««««rr-Krenf?an — in 

THE GREEN PROMISE 

THUBSDAY FEBBUABY 23 

Marjorie Lord - Robert Shayne 
— in — 

THE STRANGE 
MRS. CRANE 



church, with .Mrs. S. A. Roberts pre- 
siding. The meeting was opened 
with devotions by Mrs. Minnie Let- 
cher. Plans were made tor an oys- 
ter and chili supper to be held in the 
basement of the church March 11. 
Proceeds from this affair will be 
added to the building fund. After 
the meeting, refreshments were serv- 
ed by Mrs. Edith Coleman, Mrs. 
Marie Cornelius and Mrs. Mary Cole- 
man. Attending were Mesdames 
Alma Gibson, Hazel Hand, Helen 
Frazer, Katie Gibson, Anna Roberts, 
Virginia Watson, Addle Tipton, John 
Chambers, Mary Riley, Edith Cole- 
man, Margaret Balrd, Mary Coleman, 
Mildred Schenck, Nancy Steger, 
Helen Mann, Marie Cornelius, Min- 
nie Letcher, Shirley Benson, Rose 
Stevens, Mary Stephens and visitors, 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, John Chambers 
Leslie iFrazer and Edw. Schenck. 

6475 STUDENTS ENROLL AT UK 

At the close of the regular regis- 
tration period last week, second se- 
mester enrollment at the University 
of Kentucky stood at 6,575, according 
to an announcement by University 
Registrar Lee Sprowles. Breakdown 
of the mid-year enrollment shows; 
6,140 students attending classes on j 
the Lexington campus, 204 at the 
College of Pharmacy in Louisville,'! 
and 231 at the Northern Extension! 
Center in Covington. Late registra-l 



tion is expected to push final enroll- 
ment near the 7,000 mark, Dr. 
Sprowles said. 

85th ANNIVERSARY 

The University of Kentucky will 
observe its 85th birthday February 
22 with the formal dedication of its 
new $1,500,000 Fine Arts building, 
«he first new classroom building con- 
structed on its campus'since the war. 
Plans have been completed for a 
week-long program dedicated to the 
fine arts — music, art and drama — 
and emphasizing the Important con- 
tributions Kehtuckians have made 
in these fields. Dally programs fea- 
turing University artists and writers 
as well as out-of-state visitors prom- 



inent in literary, music and art cir- 
cles have been scheduled. 



STURGEON 

Electrical Service 

—Wiring of All Kinds— 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 
— Phone 71 or 1396— 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



For the Best In Heating 
J ar man Heating Service 

WALTON ... 524 
Engineered Heating — Coed, Oil, 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



AUCTION 

10 Head Dairy Cattle 

Farm Implements - Household Goods 

Friday, Feb. 24 - io a. m. 

Located on Route 14, 2 Miles South of BRACHT STATION, KY., and known as 
the Dr. H. F. Mann Farm — — — — 

DAIRY CATTLE — 1 Red cow, 5 years old; 1 Ayreshire heifer, 3 years old; 2 
Brindle cows, 6 years old; 1 Ayreshire heifer, coming 3 years old; 1 Black Jersey 
cow, 8 years old ; 1 Guernsey cow, 6 years old, close up springer ; 1 Jersey cow, 6 
years old, to be fresh by day of sale ; 2 Holstein cows, 5 and 7 years old, both heavy 
springers; most of these cows are giving a good flow of milk, all are good producers, 
and tested for T. B. and Bangs. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS — Iron wheel farm wagon with hay frame and box bed; 
hay rake; disc harrow; 3 mowing machines; 2 hillside plows; 2-horse sled; cteel 
land roller; Rastus plow, and numerous other items. 

HORSES— Team work horses, extra good. 

HOUSEHOL DGOODS— Kitchen cabinet; ice box; dresser; rocker; fruit pars; 
5-burner coal oil stove and many other items not listed. 

Mr. Clarence Whitton has decided to quit fanning and has listed the above proper- 
ty to sell at public auction. 

TERMS: CASH, DAY OF SALE! Lunch Served by Goshen Christian Church 

Clarence Whitton, Owner 

c - 

> Sale In Charge Of 

COL. LUTE BRADFORD AUCTION CO. 

FLORENCE, KY.— Phone 229 WALTON, KY.— Phone 671 

COL. LUTE BRADFORD & COL. A. F. WORTHINGTON, AUCTIONEERS 

LUCIAN BRADFORD, Sales Manager 
Listen to WZIP, 12:00 Noon, Wednesday, February 22! 



■ , >i* 



— — 




All-New 1951 KAISER 

Makes Bow With Many 

New Safety Features 



Continental Styling. Large Glass 

Area, Padded Instrument Panel/ 

And New Engine Mark 

Advanced Design 

Kaiser- Frazer Corp. today pre- 
sented the completely new line of 
1951 Kaiser automobiles — all-new 
from bumper to bumper and from 
road to roof. v 

First of three all-new lines to be 
marketed this year by Kaiser- 
Frazer to compete in every major 
price range in 21*body styles, the 
1951 Kaiser models are distinct- 
ively styled in custom-built Con- 
tinental fasihion. 

New Kaiser styling and funct- 
ional "firsts" offer such features 
and innovations as 'control tower" 
vision, with larger passenger oar 
glass area than any other sedan; 
a new Kaiser "Supersonic" 115- 
horsepower high torque engine; 
balanced body and chassis design 
combining light weight with ex- 
tra ordinary structural strength; a 
low, 60-inch profile with the cen- 
ter of gravity cradled below the 
tire line; the industry's first full- 
padded crash absorbing instru- 
ment panel, and new livink room 
interiors with lounge-type seats. 

A well-balanced blending of 
body and chassis has given the 
new models .exceptional head- 
room, legroom and ease of entry, 
without resort to depressed floor 
construction or other design com- 
promises. 

The 1951 Kaisers are offered in 
12 body types — Special and De- 
Luxe four-door sedans, two-door 
sedans, club coupes, business 
coupes, and two and four-door 
Traveler utility sedans-*each With 
a customer's choice of convention- 
al drive, overdrive or Hydra- 
Matic. 

Edgar F. Kaiser, president, de- 
scribed the new Kaiser line as 
Kaiser-iFrazer's answer to "public 
desire for a truly modern, safety- 
styled automobile ... a car bal- 
anced in every detail without be- 
ing radical In any . . . the car of 
tomorrow, today." 

Kaiser said that the 1951 line 
Is the result of nearly five years 
of creative engineering by K--F 
styling, .body, engine and chassis 
designers. 



Unmistakable Continental styl- 
ing touches are apparent in the 
new automobile. They are evi- 
dent in the "sweetheart curves" 
in the roof "at the top centers of 
the windshield and rear window, 
and in the "gull-wing" dips which 
simulate rear fender lines. 

Likewise of Continental flavor 
is the "single roll" design of the 
body, which curves in an unbrok- 
en line from base to window level. 

There is a slight down-sweep to 
both front and rear fenders, with 
the overall flowing design theme 
carried out in the lines of the 
"cascade" back. 

Another identifying note is a 
protective chrome trim panel, or 
rub rail, which extends at bump- 
er level for the entire length of the 
car. 

The 3,541-square-inch safety 
glass area, in addition to provid- 
ing unmatched vision, also offers 
the advantages of aerodynamic 
design. The windshield, which 
sweeps back at a 51.5 degree ang- 
le, presents a total area of 1,096 
square inches — by far the largest 
of any sedan. 

The windshield posts, which are 
rigid structural members of the 
all-steel body, are set well back 
from the driver's lateral range of 
vision. Slimmest in the industry, 
the slender posts virtually elim- 
inate a "blind spot" particularly 
hazardous in city driving. 

The broad, 1,000-square-Inch 
reaT window curves in harmony 
with the lines of the cascade back, 
thus contributing to greater all- 
around vision and reduced wind 
"drag." New type mounting of 
the side glass, nearly flush with 
the exterior body panels, effect- 
ively curbs wind noise. 

'Blending of chassis and body 
design has resulted in two "plus" 
performance factors. One is an 
unusually short turning radius 
which permits the driver to man- 
euver the car in a tight circle. The 
other is exceptional clearance 
provided for vertical travel or 
"jounce" of wheels when the car 
is driven over rough roads. 

Safety and ease of handling al- 
so stem &om the design of the 
new x-type frame, which acts as 



a skid ftn protecting the engine 
and vit^r underbody parts from 
| damage. 

Other advances include over-^ 
size "jumbo" brakes nearly doub- 
le the, efficiency and life of that 
| of the average of the industry; 
| new "Tru-Line" center - point 
peering with "lock-socket" link- 
lage; new springing which curbs 
side sway and "squat" and "dip"' 
in starts and stops; new pistol- 
grip 4iand brake conveniently lo- 
cated next to the ignition switch; 
.high capacity fresh air-condition- 
: ing with defrosting across the en- 
I tire windshield; single-key ig- 
I nition and lock system; customer - 
| tailored front seat location with 
an adjustable range of seven in- 
ches, as compared to the indus- 
try's average of four; freeze- proof . 
door locks and door^atches effec- 
tive accidental opening, and 
"tumble-home" doors. 

An exclusive Kaiser conveni- 
ence feature is the "tuck -away" 
tire well in the spacious trunk, 
where the spare tire is recessed ^ 
out of sight and out of the way for 
scuff -proof luggage storage. When 
in place, the tire well cover is an 
integral part of the floor. 

New also is the 115 h. p. Kaiser 
"Supersonic" engine offered for 
the first time in K-F's 1951 mod- 
els. The Supersonic is smoother, 
quieter and more powerful than 
any previous K-F engine, with 
substantially better acceleration 
and fuel economy. 

Among the features contribut- 
ing to its efficiency are a high- 
capacity sealed cooling system; 
precision balanced pistons with a 
flash crome upper ring; center- 
of -gravity type engine mounting; 
a 100 per cent counterbalanced 
crankshaft; a hydraulic damper; 
extra Tigid block, and new "mush- 
room" tappets. 

"Our dealers," Mr. Kaiser stat- 
ed, "are the only new car dealers 
in America who will have abso- 
lutely new 1951 automobiles, with 
styling and engineering features 
years ahead of competition. With 
three new lines of merchandise 
created to £it every pocket book, 
Kaiser -IFrazer is in a position to 
make an agressive bid for a lead- 
ing place in the industry." 



B-M SALES & SERVICE 



'Your Kai8er J Frazer Dealer" 



PHONE 38 



WALTON, KY. 









I 

I 
I 



UBBB^Ml 




D 



— 



Thursday, February 16, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Nine 



Baby Chicks 



Pullorum Passed N. H. Reds - White Rocks 

Member of Kentucky Poultry Improving Assn. 

Jamesway Equipment - Salisbury Remedies 

Provico Feeds 



PolHtt'S Hatchery & Supplies 



FLORENCE, KY. 



PHONE 159 



—ADDITIONAL^- 

Want Ads 



FOR SALE— 1938 Ford Tudor sedan. 
Inquire at Beighle Bros. Grocery. 
Phone Walton 25. 2t-7* 



LOST— Hound, black and tan. Re- 
ward. Answers to name of Lead. 
M. Gabbard. Phone Walton 741X. 

lt-7* 



FOR SALE— Team of mares, 5 and 6 
years old; will sell one or both. 
George W. Flynn, Stephenson Mill 
Road, Walton, Ky. lt-7* 



FOR SALE— F-30 Farmall tractor on 
rubber; model "B" Farmall with 
2-A plow; also 2-row cultivator; 
first class conditlpn. Calvin Cress 
& Son, Burlington, Ky. 2t-7 

WANTED— Team of mules or small 
horses. Henry Harrison, Morning 
View, Ky. Phone Ind. 6709. 2t-6* 



FOR SALE — 1946 Pontiac Station 
Wagon, perfect condition. Call 
Walton 542. Wilson Case. * 4t-4 

FOR SALE-r-8-room modern home on 
High Street, Walton; full base- 
ment, furnace, hot and cold runn- 
ing water, cabinet sink, wall cab- 
inets. T. M. Vest. - 2t-7* 



FOR SALE— 25 White Rock pullets. 

- Oscar Moore; on Moffett Rd., from 

Atwood. " lt-7 



FOR SALE--Gasoline "South Wind" 
heater, $10; electric compressor 
and paint sprayer, $35; 30-inch 
blower, $30; car radio, standard for 
'42- '48 Ford, $35. Glenn Stevens, 
Route 2, Box 314, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 419. 2t-7 



FOUND — Two stray dogs. Owner 
may have same by identifying and 
paying for this ad. Phone Wal- 
ton 783X. lt-7 



WANTED — Someone to raise 9/10 
acre tobacco, and 3 or 4 acres of 
corn, on shares; located on Wal- 
ton - Nioholson Highway. Phone 
Ind. 6392. 2t-7* 



FOR SALE— 1946 Reo truck, 3 -ton 
tandem, 20-ft. flat; owner will fi- 
nance and furnish regular haul- 
ing to reliable party. Glenn 

• Stevens, Route 2, Box" 314, FIdr " 
ence, Ky. Phone 419. •- 2t-7 



FOR SALE — DeLaval cream separ- 
ator; 1- horse corn drill with fer- 
tilized attachment; 5-shovel cul- 
tivator; J^-shpvel _plow. W.P.Rob- 
inson, Walton.'Phone 852. 2t-7 



WASHER 
REPAIR 

Any Make 

Parts for AH 
Popular Makes 

1 * ■ in * i 

Just Give Us A Call :. . 
DIXIE 7113 

HAGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Kentucky 




Hamilton & Jones 



Invites You to Shop! 



Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" 
LOWEST PRICES- 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



I 
I 

I 



THE N EW DE LAVAL STERLING SPEEDETTE 

mwiwmmmmWBMMmm Especially Designed 

for the Man Who 

Milks Ten Cows 

or Less! 

The new De Laval Sterling Speed - 
ette is designed especially for the 
man milking 10 cows or less. Your 
pocketbook can afford it— and you 
can't afford to be without it! It will 
save up to 68 full working days a 
year on a 10-cow herd, save you 
countless steps, do the milking In- 
half the time and produce more and 
cleaner milk for you. See it today! 




Ito Your Toughest 

Plowing Requirements! 



THIANSMR 







For * plow with 
plenty of brute 
strength . . . high 
lift for easy turning 
and transporting . . . 
plus the extra clear- 
ance necessary for 
deep plowing in 
trashy conditions, 
find a John 
re Truss-Frame 
Plow unsurpassed. 
Its many features 
make it a real leader 
in two-, three-, and 
four-bottom plow 
▼aloe. See as for 
fall details . . . soon. 



V 



JOHN DEERE TRUSS-FRAME PLOWS 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 



110 PIKE STREET 



COVINGTON, KY. 



WANTED — Feed distributor and 
salesman to sell animal and poul- 
try feeds in Boone County. Appli- 
cant-must be of good character, 
■aggressive and understand feed- 
ing. Excellent opportunity for an 
a ™<- ■■ ■■• ■ — „ .-jii^jjjn. Write, Excella 
to 1 1 or Lflvision, Lawrenceburg 
Terminal Elevator Corp., Law- 
renceburg, Ind. lt-7 



FOR' SALE— Very good high protein 
Soybean hay, baled. Phone Ind. 
6882. tf-6 

FQR SALE— Ottawa gasoline driven 
power saw, $35. Glenn Stevens, 
Route 2, Box 314, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 419. 2t-7 



RUSSELL'S Refrigeration and Appli- 
ance Service — Refrigerators, milk 
coolers, pumps, etc. Phone Inde- 
pendence 7430. ' 4t-7* 



FOR RENT — Three-Toom flat, in 
Glencoe. Walter Noel. Phone 
Glencoe 3041. 2t-7* 



VICK'S SALES & SERVICE 



South Main Street 



Walton, Kentucky 



-PHONE lcV 



FOR SALE— Building lots in Walton, 
off Bedinger Ave., new subdivision. 
Sam Winkle, Walton, Ky. 2t-7* 



FOR SALE — Four-wheel solid tire 
trailer,- 10-ton capacity, $60. Glenn 
Stevens, Florence, Ky., Route 2. 
Phone 419. ' 2t-7 



FOR SALE — Large mare mule, 4 
years old, work anywhere; wood- 
wheel wagon, box bed, side board 
and 14-ft. hay frame; 2-horse 
mowing machine, cuts well; all 
priced reasonably. Raymond H. 
Baker, Verona, Ky. Phone Glen- 
coe 2798. 2t-7* 



WORK WANTED— By lady and dau- 
ghter; house work or washings by 
the day. Clata Rider, 62 High St., I NOTICE— CONCERNING 



FOR SALE— 1935*01dsmobile sedan, 
good motor, good tires, $35, or will 
sell tires, 5.50x17, reasonable; al- 
so five 650x17, one 6-ply, rest 4- 
ply, with fubes. f* 1 **©; 1 Itemnah 
garden .T ifjS&j/mxl- 

ed, $110; Peerless organ, cheap; 
Duck eggs for setting, 6c each; 
large Warm Morning cabinet type 
style No. 420, very good condition, 
$50. Phone Ind. 6429. lt-7* 

FOR SALE— One saw mill, not as- 
sembled, $225. Glenn Stevens, 
Florence, Ky., Route 2. Phone 419. 

, 2t-7 

FOR SALE— 200" bales third cutting 
alfalfa. Russell Sparks, Verona, 
Ky. Phone Walton 289. 2t-7* 



\ 



Wrecker Service 

(Day or Night) 
GULF GAS - OIL - GREASING 



FREE Grease Job with each 75 gal. 
of Regular or Ethyl Gas purchased! 




Walton. 



lt-7' 



FOR SALE — Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. tf-1 



FOR SALE— Hay, straw, corn, alf- 
alfa, mixed hay, timothy, wheat 
or oat straw. Russell Klein 
Morning Viey, Ky. Phone Ind. 6427 

6t-5* 



BABY CHICKS— Ohio U. S. Approved, 
Pullorum Controlled. Chicks hatch- 
ing every Sunday, Monday and 
Thursday, Plenty of chicks on hand 
at all times. Open day and night. 
New Hamtpshires, White and Bar- 
red iRocks, $10.90 per 100; all pul- 
.lets, $13.90; cockerels, $11.50. S. C. 
White Leghorns, $11.90; pullets, 
$24.50; cockerels, $3.00. Buff, White 
and Black Minoxcas, Buff Leg- 
horns, Austra Whites, $12.90; pul- 
lets, $26.00; cockerels, $6.00. S. C. 
Reds, Buff Rocks, Buff Orphington, 
White Wyandottesi' Hamp-Rock 
Cross, Rock-Hamp Cross, $11.90; 
pullets, $14.90; cockerels $12.50. 
■White and Black Giants, Light 
Brahmas, $13.95. Heavy assorted, 
all heavies, $9.50 per 100. Plenty 
White Rocks and New Hampshires 
one week old on hand at $13.90 
per 100; two weeks old, $17.90; 
three weeks old, $22.90. White Pe- 
kin Ducklings, $30.00 per 100. Or- 
der your turkey poults now, for 
delivery any time after March 15 
at $89.00 per 100. Turkeys and 
Ducks hatching on Sundays only. 
We carry a full line of poultry sup- 
plies, feeders and founts, poultry 
remedies and thermometers. Drive 
to this modern hatchery and see 
■these exceptional bargains. Visit- 
ors welcome. Phone Jackson 9354. 
Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, Winton & 
McKelvey Roads, Mt. Healthy, O. 

lt-7 




RAY HALL 

Manufacturing Optician 

Doctor's Optical Prescriptions 

Accurately Filled, Broken 

Lenses Replaced. Expert 

Optical Repairing 

122 PIKE ST. COVINGTON 
HEmlock 1992 



—DEAD STOCK- 
REMOVED PROMPTLY 
Horses, $2.50 - Cows. $2.50 
Hogs, 25c cwt 
According to Size & Condition 
Call Otis Readnour 
WALTON 178 
ex Butler 6901, eollectl 

Griffin Fertilizer Co. 

Home Owned & Operated 



THE WALTON CEMETERY 

It was voted unanimously that 
there shall be no more burials at 
theWalton Cemetery on Sundays. 

Also any company or person wish- 
ing to erect monuments must con- 
tact sexton before erecting same. 

By order of Walton Baptist Church, 
January 18, 1950. 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Moderator 
Bryan Rector, Church Clerk 
3t-6 



MASTER MIX 



CUNUtlTTrrt IT:S 

AND 
STRAIGHT FEEDS 



Bring In 250 lbs. Corn and Mix with. 100 lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig Starter at a low cost of only $3.15 per 100 lbs. 

Walton Feed Mill 




Incorporated 



WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 57 



DR. PAUL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



There Is (ART) In A RTISTIC 

—FREE CALL & DELIVERY— 
16 South Main St. Phone 144 Walton, Ky. 



Fur Coats Cleaned & Glazed 

Altering Invisible Reweaving 

Relining Dyeing 

Leather and Suede Jackets Ref ifiished Like New 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quality Work . . . Guaranteed 
All Garments Insured — 



I. C. GAINES Prop. 



-DAVE WORKMAN 



Pontiac Trade-in Sale 

All our used cars have been reconditioned by our expert factory-trained mechanics and the follow- 
ing items checked : Tune motor, carburetor, spark plugs, valves, starter,, battery, points, generator, 
radiator, wheel alignment, steering, brakes, transmissions, differential, lights — carry our guarantee. 

'49 Chevrolet deluxe sedan coupe; looks new $1495 
'49 Pontiac "6" sed. cpe. Hy dramatic; like new $1995 



'48 Pontiac grey hydramatic sedan . . 
'47 Pontiac 2-tone sedan; low mileage . 
'48 Oldsmobile "6" Hydramatic, 2-Door 
'46 Chevrolet station wagon; like new . 
'46 Chevrolet black fleetline sedan . . 
'47 Ford super de luxe maroon sedan . - 
'48 Hudson brown sedan; low price 

Dodge black de luxe sedan 

Ford super de luxe maroon club coupe; unusual 
'39 Dodge club coupe ... 

*37 Dodge business coupe .... 
'36 Ford grey tudor; low price 



'47 
*46 



$1695 

$1395 

$1695 

$1095 

$1095 

$1095 

$1495 

$1295 

$895 

$395 

$295 

$195 



Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 



TERMS TO SUIT! 



UP TO 24 MONTHS TO PAY! 



Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINCTON, KY. 



s <•• 



^mmmim 



Page Ten 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 16, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION '^W 



Classified advertising rate is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cara in advance. 

FOR SALE— Team of horses, 6 years 
old, and harness, well broke; 2 
tons Korean arid Timothy hay; 
Oliver chill steel beam plow, No. 
20, same as new. J. R. Worthing- 
ton, Walton. Phone 512X. 2t-7* 



Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued on Page 5) 

SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if ordered 
now! For prices and information, 
call A. R. Kwozalla, Erlanger, Ky., 
Route 4. Phone Florence' 593. tf -49 



BOONE COUNTY FARM^Near Ve- 
rona, Highway 16; 78 acres, 6-room 
modern home, full basement ; large 
tobacco and «tock barn; stripping 
room; corn crib; garage; up-to- 
date chicken house and broader 
house; fenced, crossed fenced; 3 
ponds, 2 cisterns; 2-acre tobacco 
base; 300 young Pine trees, 1,800 
Black locust; all tractor land; 800 
feet frontage on Highway 16. J. R. 
Worthington, Walton, Phone 512X. 

- 2t-7* 

FOR SALE — 75 tons good quality 
mixed clover and timothy ' hay, 
70% clover. Ralph Jones, Pleasant 
Plain, Ohio, 30 miles Northeast of 
Cincinnati. - 4t-6* 



FOR SALE — Warm Morning stoves. 

Call Walton 774. Priced $20 eacti. 

:r* - " 4t-4* 

FOR SALE— 60 White Leghorn pul- 
lets, now laying, $1.50 each. Daw- 
son E. Hightower, Route 1, Wal- 
ton. Phone Ind. 7284. 2t-6* 



FOR SALE— 1939 Ford JB %-ton 
stake with racks. C. Patton, 2 
miles West and 1 mile North of 
Verona, Ky. lt-7* 

CHICKS and Hatching Eggs from 
high producing, pullorum-tested 
Reds. Breeders immunized against 
Newcastle. Chicks from such a 
flock can make money for you. 
Grants Maddox, Florence. Phone 
384. 6t-2 

FOR SALg— Hay, first, second, third 
and fourth cutting alfalfa; also 
Lespedeza and timothy ; good clean 
straw; all baled. J. E. Huff, 4 
miles South of Walton, 1% miles 
North of Crittenden, 'on Wes side 
railroad. Phone Ind. 6499. 4t-4* 



FOR SALE— 2 good used John Deere _ 
tractors, just reconditioned, that S *™™ G MACHINE SALES * SER- 
we have<taken in on trade for new 



ARTIFICIAL *«*'~k*- »^^t works, 
it pays, it gets calves. Sfgnup In 
■the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay- 
lor, Walton 582. ' tf-45 

FOR RENT— Three-room apartment, 
unfurnished, heat and water fur- 
nished. W. W. Ryle, 44 South Main 
St., Walton. Phone 26. tf-4 



John Deere tractors; tobacco cot- 
ton, AAA grade, $9.50. Pettit's 
Farm Machinery Co., Williams- 
town, Ky. Phone 4931. 2t-6 



FOR SALE— Two dairy cows, 6 and 
8 years old. Ohas. May, Sr Dry 
Ridge, Ky. Phor«.- ~7Z: ■ 
2677. . 2t-7* 



FOR SALE — Kentucky U. S. approv- 
ed, pullorum passed chicks, White 
Rocks and N. H. Reds. Pollett's 
Hatchery & Supplies, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 159. Jamesway Equipment, 
Salisbury Remedies and Provico 
Feeds. 4t-6 



VICE— -All nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, . Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf-1 



,7FOR SALE— Set double fug^harness 
with checklines, no bridles. Jas. ! 
Brewer, Verona, Ky., Route 1. 2t-6* I 



■ CONRAD HARDWARE 



Special This Month . $99.50 Cash 



PLUMBING & HEATING— Repairs or 
, new installations', furnace clean- 
ing and service on stokers, gas or 
oil furnaces. Tri-County Heating 
and Plumbing Co. Florence 593. 

tf-49 



Hamilton & Jones 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



Invites You to Shop! 






The Capehart Prelude $279.95 

with Pdafmma (built-in atrial) 

HOW 

TELEVISION 

with 2 Great Exclusi ves 

Exclusive Capehart Tone 

brings television to life! 

Exclusive Polatron* Tube 

brings new clarity to every 
image! 

SK...HEAR CAPEHART TODAY I 
Prices start at $239.95 



To Prove You Can't Match a 

FRIGIDAIRE 

Master Model for 1950 



Service on all types of 
household electric appli- 
ances by Hall's Electric 
and Appliance- Service lo- 
cated in store basement. 



Immediate 
Delivery 




Monthly Terms 
If Desired 



Wherever you live — whatever 
the size of your family; kitchen 
or budget— be sure to see the 
new Frigidaire Refrigerators 
for 1950. See the complete 
line of sizes from 4 to 17 cu. ft. 
— see all the reasons why your 
No. 1 choice is America's No. 1 
Refrigerator, FRIGIDAIRE I 

NEW gold-and-white "target" 
latch and trim 

NEW Super-Storage design 
with full-length door on larger 
models 



Others from 194.75 



NEW improved Meter-Miser 

NEW shelves are all -alumi- 
num and rust-proof 

NEW split shelf allows room 
for large, bulky items 

NEW swing -down shelf for 
butter, cheese, small items 

NEW all-porcelain Twin Hy- 
drators that stack up 

NEW all-porcelain Meal 
Storage Tray 





_ 0/y/S 



h£ ^*rOf *t0 ENGIHE 
WITH ALL THESE BETTER REO FEATURES: 

• Climb, stop hills. 

• Rugged oN-s*mI construction. 



• Big capacity. Full 21" cutting 
width, "cuts mar* grass with 
hu gas." 



• Quick skirting 1% hp 4 cycle 
too engine uiei "regular" gas. 

• Easy to hand!*. 



• Safely enclosed V-b«H clutch and 
OHM drive). 

• Grass catcnar optional. 



8-ft. Lime Spreader 

on rubber $185.00 

Massey-Harris Tobacco 

Setter _____ __; $195.00 

Little Giant Lime 

Spreader $69.50 

OLD ENGLISH 

POLISH 




250 



7 cu. ft. Gibson Refrigerator $189.95 

Used 3 cu. ft. Kelvinator Refrigerator $50.00 

Perfection Gas Range (installed) $299.00 

Perfection Electric Range (installed) $299.00 

Perfection Kerosene Range $159.00 

Gibson Electric Range (installed) ... $239.00 

Boys or Girls Bicycle $38.00 

Jamesway Electric Hover A—f\ $39.95 

Jamesway Electric Heated 8-gal. Fouyt-al $10.80 

Jamesway 5-ft. Feeder ;_„#'_ $6.00 

Complete Line of Jamesway Hay Carriers and Track 

Interior Gloss Enamel i_____ gal. $4.95 

Flozotone Water Paint 1 gal. $2.85 



Hides scratches and polishes 
furniture, both at the same time 



Eclipse Lawn Mower, 
20-inch cut .... $114.50 

Bissell Carpet 

Sweeper .... $6.95 




Dayton Water Sys. $74.50 



for Service 



Large or Small 
. . . See Powers 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES Or HOUSEHOLD 
APPLIANCES 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKY 



STARTED CHICKS at Bargain Prices 
— Thousands on hand. All breeds. 
One week old, $13.96 per 100; two 
weeks old, $17.90; three weeks, 
$22.90. Plenty of feed, brooders 
and poultry supplies. Come to this 
'mammoth hatchery and see these 
bargains. Visitors welcome. Mt. 
Healthy Hatcheries, Winton and 
McKelvey Roads, Mt. Healthy, O. 
Phone Jackson 9354. lt-7 

FOR SALE— Four purebred Angus 
bull calves, 1 years old. Cloyd 
Kannady, Verona, Ky. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE— Wagon with box bed; 
disc harrow; 2 mowing machines. 
Martin Code, Green Road, Walton, 
Route 1. Phone Ind. 6725. 2t-6* 

FOR THE BEST in Electric wiring-— 
Call John T. Campbell, Walton 157. 
Trouble calls day or night. 4t-5* 

FOR SALE — Fresh Holstein cows, 
young, T. B. and Bangs tested, 
calfhood vaccination. Lawrence 
Turner, 1 mile West of Walton on 
Stephenson Mill Road. Phone Wal- 
ton 741. 2t-6* 



FOR SALE— Jersey cows, $175 and 
$200. Charles Napier, Highway 16, 
near Verona. Phone Glencoe 2707. 

2t-6* 



FARMS WANTED— Small or larger 
we have a large list of customers 
waiting. For quick, reliable realty 
service, call us. Sallee Real Estate 
Co., 108 Locust St., Erlanger, Ky. 
Phone Dixie 7119. tf-4 



FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
First class work, guaranteed, good 
'service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 .Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, K_/. tf-2 



FOR SALE — Kenton county farm, 
jclose in, good dairy or tobacco 
Jland, in bluegrass; house, barn. 
jOwner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, 
Ky. 4t-5* 



FOR SALE— First, second and third 
cutting of alfalfa, bailed; timothy 
and clover; also timothy and clov- 
er, mixed. McBee Bros., Williams- 
town. Phone Williamstown 4192 
or 4073. 8t-4* 



FOR SALE— Two registered, Guern- 
sey cows, 1 heifer and a bull; 5 
grade Jersey cows, heavy spring- 
ers. J. K. Franks, Williamstown, 
Ky. Phone 2932. 2t-6» 

YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. tf-46 

FOR SALE— Post Office building at 
Verona) ^y. Good location for a 
business^ can easily be made in- 
to dwelling. Lizzie Vest. lt-7* 



INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers it's 
members life insurance, auto and 
truck insurance (largest in Ken- 
tucky), fire and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross*Hospita_i- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tf-2 



BABY CHICKS, AAAA Grade Rocks, 
Reds, Wyandottes, Orphingtons, 
Australorps, Leghorns, Anconas. 
Also special table grade chicks, 
no sex or breed guaranteed and 
brooder plans $6.95 per 100. Pre- I 
paid. From U. S. Approved Pul- ! 
lorum Passed Flocks. Breeder plans 
without chicks for making oil or 
electric brooder to raise 50 to 200 
chicks to fryers $2.00. Hoosier, 
716 West Jefferson, Louisville, Ky. 
, : ' .■'■■> tf-7 



FOR RENT— Power Chain Saws with 
one man $3.50 per hour. Phone 
Florence 419. tf-50 



FOR SALE — 6-room home, modern 
to the minute; priced for quick 
sale. 74 North Main St., Walton, 
Ky.r Phone 173. lt-7* 




1946 Chevrolet T-oDor 1941 Chev. 5-Pass. Coupe 

1 946 Chevrolet Fleetline 1 935 Ford V-8 Coupe 

1 94 1 Plymouth T-Door USED TRUCKS— 

1 941 Pontiac T-Door 1 946 G. M. C. 2-ton 

1940 Mercury (6) Coupe 1939 Chevrolet Dump 

1 939 Pontiac 4-Door 1 939 White 2_/ 2 -ton Dump 

1 93 7 Chevrolet Coupe 1 948 Chevrolet 161" 2. ton 

Heavy. Duty Wrecker Service 

Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. 5004 



Also Cooking, 



and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, KY. 



va&Ltf 






n 



WALT 




f)p 



' 




S 



— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY - BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 



Subscription $1.50 Per Y 



ear in 



Adva 



nee 



WALTON, KENTUCKY - THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23. 1950 




'umimi 
pwtisaiit 




Many Local Girls Take 
Part in Joint Meeting 



Tri-Hi-Y Clubs and Y-Teen Clubs' 
Joint Conference was held in the 
Covington Y. M. C. A., Saturday, Feb. 
18 from 9:30 a. m. to 3:00' p. m. The 
conference theme was, "Growth 
In "Charm." Miss Joyce" Swango, 
President of the Carfrollton Y-Teens 
and President of the Conference, 
presided. 

Miss Jean Ryle, President of ithe 
Hebron Y-Teens, is Conference Song 
Leader. * 

Holmes Tri-Hl-Y Club led tht 



Community House at 
Oak Island Scene of 
Enjoyable Meeting 



MISS MARY F. CHAPMAN 

Miss Mary Frances (Molly) Chap- 
man of Walton, died Tuesday at the 
home of a nephew, John E. Chapman, 
1701 Pleasant St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
She had been staying in Cincinnati 
for the last six weeks. She was 70 
years old. 

Miss Chapman is survived by a 
sister, Miss Anna Chapman, Walton, 
who had accompanied her sister to 
Cincinnati, and several nieces and 
nephews. 

Services will ,be held at 2:00 p. m., 
Thursday at the Walton Baptist 
Oh^pjh, With the pastor, Rev. B. C. 

J»t, officiating. Burial is to be 

'£. Zion Cemetery in Grant co- 

¥■ • ■ --.•». , 

'(Chambers & Grubbs funeral 

homfiWalton, hav<»charge of the 

Li — 



Volume 35 — Number 8 



Hayesmen Hang Up 20th Win; 
Play New Haven Here Friday 



Briede-Weldon Nuptials Performed 



.cements. 

ST. ~ " 



A rather unique pot-luck supper 
was enjoyed by some 45 people latfj 
Saturday 'at' the Oak Island ebrrF 
morning worshirv«>«a^pe and Morgan munity house. The occasion was a 
Y-Teens ha<rchafge_of "^aiternoon ' sort of homecoming for a nur»r^ 
worahip- I people who , had attended "'school* *-aymai?s Day Sunday At 

Miss Betty Gaskdns, Simon Kenton there.* } Ay,n rt _ M~tk n ,i: * nt. L 

Y-Teens introduced Miss Shirley! Thds comnfthij n™** was orig-l ^£1 " „f, "* " hUTch 
Spencer of Merle Normon Studios, inally a KentoTR County District*^' 
who gave a demonstration on the school building, the successor to an 
Care of Skin." \ old Jog structure which was the first 

The Bracken County Y-Teens had school house built in the locality, 
charge of the special musdeal pro-jTlhe present, building was erected a- 
gram for the afternoon sessdon. | bout 1870 and^ was used for a school 

Miss June Ramage, President of until the Plner Consolidated was 
the University of Cincinnati Campus ! buidt about ?5 years ago. T^old 
Y, W. C. A. addressed the conference school was later sold to the Oak Is- 
at 1:30 on "Spiritual Charm." land Baptist ChuTCh by the Coiinty 

Films on"Charm In Correct Social School Board and it is now used as 
Grace," were shown at 2:00 p. m. an overflow Sunday school room 

Ludlow Y-Teens led in the In- and a meeting place for the Farmers' 
stallation Ceremonial for new offi- Club and the Homemakers. 



. Methodist Layman's 
.jfiay service will he observed at the 
W#. ton Methodist Church on Sun- 
dayJFebruary 26 at 11:00 a. m. 

WT^ard Wade, Lay Leader of the 
Covirrton District, will be the guest 
spea^rf. 

AlJ^laymen of the church are urg- 
ed to he .present. All visitors will 
be welcomed. 



cers ,at the close of the program. 

Two hundred delegates from fif- 
teen schools of Northern Kentucky 
attended the conference. 



District Census Office 
Established In the 
Newport Finance Bldg. 

Establishment of a district office 
for the 17th Decennial Census of the 
United States in Newport, was an- 
nounced today by William J. Born- 
horst, Census District Supervisor for 
the Fifth Congressional District. The 
Census District office is located in 
*he Finance Bldg., 4th and York Sts. 
The phone number is AXtel 1812. 

Mr. Bornhorst states that prelim- 
inary work on the 1950 Census, to be 
taken in April, will begin immedi- 
ately. This includes organization of 
the district office, conducting pub- 
licity, interviewing and testing ap- 
plicants for Jobs as enumerators. 

The territory included in the Cen- 
sus District is comprised of the co- 
unties of Boone, Campbell, Grant, 
Gallatin, Kenton, Oldham, Pendle- 
ton and Trimble. Enumeration dis- 
tricts will be established for each of 
these counties and for sections of 
the larger communities in each co- 
unty. Approximately 225 enumer- 
ators will be employed to take the 
1950 Census in this area. 

These enumerators will make the 
house-to-house calls in .the work of 
collecting official Census informa- 
tion regarding the population and 
housing in urban areas and, addi- 
tionally, agricultural activities in 
the rural areas. 

Applicants must be citizens of the 
United States, be in good physical 
health and of excellent character, 
and betwe&n the ages of 21 to 65. 
Applicants with veteran preference 
who meet those requirements will be 
given priority over nonveteran ap- 
plications. 

Applicants for enumerator jobs in 
rural areas must have an automobile 
available in good operating condi- 
tion. The method of payment will 
provide for the cost of operating cars 
on official Census business. 

Most of the enumerators will be 
employed for a period of from two 
to four weeks. They will be expect- 
ed to complete their work within a 
limited period of time without re- 
gard to the customary number of 
hours worked each day or week. 
Evening work will be necessary in 
order to reach occupants of dwell- 
ings who are away during daytime 
calls. 



This was a fitting place for the 
supper, since 27 of those attending 
the party had been pupils of the Oak 
Island school. It was here that many 
friendships were formed, some of 
which have survived across the 
years. These were renewed and 
strengthened around the table where 
everyone enjoyed some excellent 
food. This included roast turkey and 
beef, dressing, fried chicken, baked 
ham, macaroni, potatoes, beans, a 
variety of salads, relishes, pies and 
cakes, hot rolls, tea, coffee and soft 
drinks. 

The guests included Mr. and Mrs. 
J. A. Keeney, Mrs. Anna Barberick, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Beck, Mr. and Mrs. 
Byron Stephens, Mrs. Frank Jackson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Rector, Mr. and 
Mrs. Sherman Barberiok, Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Stephens, Mr. and Mrs 
Cecil Northcutt, Mrs. Ray Beckett 
Mr. and Mrs. James Beckett, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bryan Rector, Mr. and Mrs. 
Claude Taylor, Misses Elma Taylor, 
Alma Stephens, Nell Neih<fc, Mary 
Stephens, Helen Beck, Wiloia Jack- 
son, Sue Bird, Mary Ruth Beckett, 
Nellie Jackson, Betty ""Ann' Beckett, 
Betty Lee Barberick, Irma Rector and 
Betty Taylor; Fred Neihoff, Chris 
Beck, Leo Beck, C. A. Jackson, War- 
ren VanHorn, Bobby Northcutt, Don- 
ald Keeney, Claude Taylor; Jr., and 
John W. Beckett. 

We feel .that the time bet^Been 6:30 
and 11:00 was well spent, nice we 
accomplished our purpose— { A spent 
an evening with friends oi jormer 
years in such an enjoyable way that 
we think this will prove to be the 
beginning of an occasional "get -to- 
gether," for the maintaining of those 
friendships, which will enrich each 
of our lives. We are all looking for- 
ward to the next 'time, wiben we hope 
to have better weather and a larger 
group.— Pub. Own, 



Sewer System For Florence 

The Board of Triistees of Florence, 
Ky., has taken another step toward 
the solving of the sewer problem of 
the community. All engineering 
plans for a sanitary sewer system 
have been completed and have been 
approved by state authorities. City 
Engineer O. G. Loomis* and City At- 
torney E. L. Bramlage are about 
ready to begin securing easements 
for mains and outfall lines. 

At the regular meeting of the 
Board of Trustees^held February 14, 
a resolution was Itlbpted calling for 
a general mass n^eiing to be helc; 
on March 13th to discuss further 
action. 



Simple dignity marked the nup- 
tial service in St. Joseph Catholic 
church, Saturday afternoon, Feb. 4 
at 3 o'clock when Miss Naomi Evelyn 
Briede, daughter of Albert Briede, 
708 South Fifth street, and the late 
Freda Baumeister Briede, became the 
bride of Courtland Weldon, Jr., son 
of (Mr. and Mrs. Courtland Weldon, 
738 Maple _.:.~*fev. John B. 
Reichert, pastor, read the service. 

Bouquets of white glads and pink 
carnations against the greenery of 
palms decorated the altar, which 
was agleam with cathedral tapers. 
Robert Mick was at the organ and 
the bride's uncle, George Tann, was 
soloist. His numbers were "Ave 
Maria," Schubert; "Panis Angeli- 



District Basketball 
Tourney Gets Under 
Way Next Wednesday 



St. Henry's Crusaders and the 
Walton-Verona Bearcats at the Si : 
man Kenton gym, and Burlington's 
Eagles and .the Florence Knights at 
Che St. Henry gym, provides the op- 
position in the first round of the 34th 
District Basketball Tournament, to 
get under way Wednesday night, 
March 1st. 

The second night's play will see 



cus," Caesar Franck, and the Cath- 
olic hymn, "On This Day." 

Dwight Maddov of Nicholson, Ky., 
the groom's brother-in-law, was best 
man, and Don Briede and Harry 
Bodner were ushers. 

Given in marriage by her father, 
the bride was a picture in her wedd- 
ing g™— - • Tfcifii*^ slipper satin. 
TOi B m i * . ~~*~*..^&$ & sweetheart 
neckline, long, tapering sleeves, and 
the full nylon lace skirt with over- 
drape of satin cascaded into a grace- 
ful train. Her veil ofiblush" pink 
net was of fingertip length and hung 
from a bonnet of lace. She carried 
a lovely arrangement of white cam- 
ellias and pinnochio roses, with a 
shower of ivory net. 

Her two pretty attendants were 
her sister, «Miss Helen Briede, maid 
of honor, and Miss Betty Jo Wel- 
don, the groom's sister. 

Miss Briede wore a gown of du- 
bonnet lace over a foundation of 
American Beauty taffeta, and Miss 
Weldon's gown was dusty pink lace 
over coral taffeta. They wore match- 
ing lace bonnets trimmed .with os 



Florence and Crittenden 
Are Latest Victims of 
The Bearcats of W-V 



with cascade of English dvy. 

The bride's aunt, Miss Evelyn 
Baumeister, wore a smart black 



The W.-V. Bearcats continued a- 
long victory tow the past week, 
Winning two more basketball games, 
to bring their seson's record to 20 
wins and 3 losses. Last Friday night . 
on the jhov- " '"-Jf&the Cats smother- 
ed Fid...., '*$4i-ior their seventh 
Boone County Conference victory, 
and on Tuesday of this week, they 
mauled Crittenden 68-51, with all 
hands getting to play. 

Tuesday's game saw the return to 
action of Dike Vest, who has been 
sidelined for about two weeks with 
an injured ankle, sustained during a 
praotice session. 

In the Florence fray, Walton led 
throughout, being in front 18-13 at 
the end of the first quarter; 35-21 at 
tihe half, and 47-32 at the third per- 
iod. 

Against Crittenden, the locals took 
a 27-10 lead in the first quarter and 
were never headed, being in front 
37-25 at the half, and 53-36 at the 
close of the third quarter. " 



trinh tine In tnes€ Past two encounters the 

wS S"r^ ra hkeS -*"» **** P««y -harp at times, 



and at others didn't look so good. 
But generally .the locals are playing 



T". *"""■" a good brand of ball and should be 
^ e J^i^ h l°^ acc J ssm1 ^ and troublesome for any team they meet 



Kenton Garden Club to Meet 

Mrs. George Barbour of Cincinnati 
will speak to members of the Kenton 
County Garden and Cultural Club 
Thursday, February 23 at the home 
of Mrs. Orie S. Ware. Mrs. Barbour's 
subject^ will be "Homes In Many 
Lands:" She has made a home for 
her family in six different countries. 



and another aunt, Mrs. George Tann, 
wore a navy blue ensemble. The 
groom's mother wore a navy blue 
and all had corsages of rubrum lilies. 
A buffet supper was served for the 



— 



Christian Church /Services 

The Walton Christian Church will 
have the usual m/tnang worship ser- 
vice at 11:00 a. i'J„ Sunday. 

A guest speaker will be present; 
James Spencer will preside at the 
organ, and the youth choir will be 
on hand. Plan to attend this ser- 
vice. 



W. P. Vest Named 
County Chairman of 
Savipg^ Bonds Com. 

N. Li. R Jkey, Kentucky Director 
of fieV J ,T Treasury Department's 
Savings ^nd Division, has announc- 
ed the;, appointment of Walter D. 
Vest, Walton, as County Chairman 
of the Savings Bond Committee for 
Boone county. 

In ihiis newly appointed capacity, 
Mr. Vest will assist in the promotion 
of the sale of U. S. Savings Bonds in 
Boone county, in order to bring a- 
bout an increase in the number of 
these bonds purchased. < • \ 

Mr. Vest is an outstanding attor- 
ney and is well known throughout 
Northern Kentucky. He was ap- 
pointed by County Judge C. L. Crop- 
per to the office of County Attorney, 
due to the death of Charles W. Riley' 
whach position he filled in a very 
efficient manner, until a successor 
could be elected. 



Ilebion and Simon, Kenton tangle at. immediate families in the home of 
■the latter's floor, and Lloyd and New, the bride's sister, Mrs Harry Bod 
Haven battle at St. Henry. ner, and in the evening a reception 

The semi-finals wild pit the St. ! for 100 guests was held, in the home 
Henry -Walton winner against the of her brother, Don Briede 
Hebron-Simon Kenton winner at the The bride and groom later left for 
S. K. floor, and the Burlington- ; a honeymoon trip keeping their des- 
Florence victor against the survivor tination a secret, the bride wearine 
of the Lloyd -New Haven fray. These for travel a cocoa brown dress brown 
game will be played Friday night, straw bonnet and green topper She 
March 3rd . is a graduate of Notre Dame High 

The finals will be played at the school and is employed by the Ohio 
bimon Kenton gym, Saturday night* Casualty Insurance Co Her hus 

According to R. C. Hinsdale and band, a graduate of Hamilton High 
Bert Wilmhoff, tournament manag- school, is a die cast apprentice 
ers, all games will .begin at 8:00 p. m. They will reside with the bride's 

The schedule for officials, as an- father.— Journal-News, Hamilton O 
nounced by the tourney managers, 
will be: Wednesday, Mahan and 
Gesselbracht at Simon Kenton; and 
Braun and Cover at St. Henry. On 
Thursday night, Miler and Gessel- 
bracht will work at Simon Kenton; 
Braun and Cover at St. Henry. Fri- 
day, Braun and Miller will be at 
Simon Kenton, and Mahan and Ges- 
selbracht at St. Henry. The officials 
for Saturday's finals at Simon Ken- 
ton will be Miller and Gesselbracht. 

James R. Huey and Garland Huff 
will serve as scorer and timer at 
Simon Kenton, and Bill Scheben and 
Bob iMartin will serve in the same 
capacity at St. Henry. 



during the coming tournament — and 
a large share of the credit for the 
showing the Cats have made this 
year can be placed on the shoulders 
°* Charlie Hayes, their coach. It 
seems "toe has learned a lot during 
the past year and .this knowledge is 
paying dividends. We think he de- 
serves a little pat on the back— how 
about it? 



Simon. Kenton Girls 
Win Top Honors In 
Dist. Poster Contest 



New Bethel WMS Meets 



World Day of Prayer, Friday 

The ladles of .the Wilton Christian 
Church will meet Friday afternoon 
at 2:30 in the home of Mrs. Stanley 
Bush to observe World Day of Pray- 
er. An Interesting program Is be- 
ing planned 'by the ladles. Mrs. 
Lula Huey Is in charge of the music. 



Mrs. William Damon of Kenton 
county, who has caned 32 chairs 
since she joined her homemakers 
olub, has completed the refinishing 
of an antique chest. 



Christian Ladies Aid Meets 

The Ladies Aid Society of the Wal- 
ton Christian Church met in the 
church basement last Thursday for 
the regular meeting, with- Mrs. 
Jacobs and Mrs. Messmer as host- 
esses. A lovely covered dish dinner 
was served at noon, after which the 
meeting was called to order by the 
president, Mrs. Lyda Valianding 
ham, who presided at a short bus 
iness session. Mrs. Claude Adams 
was program leader and her subject 
was based on the Bible. Several of 
the ladies took part on the. program 

Those present were Mrs. Abbde 
Bush, Mrs. Ora Fry, Mrs. E. F: Val- 
iandingham, Mrs. Clayton Percival, 
Mrs. Frank Penick, Mrs. Bertha 
Fisher, Mrs. Oleve Marsh, Mrs. Anna 
Mae Bush, Mrs. Pearl Fink, Mrs. 
Mary Johnson, Mrs. Jesse Callen, 
Mrs. Bert Parker, Mrs. Claude Adams, 
Mrs. Irene Bush, Mrs. Ada Moore, 
Mrs. Leon Hall and daughter, Mrs. 
A. Hume, Mrs. Jacobs, Mrs. Mess- 
mer, E. F. Vallandingham and Clay- 
ton Percival. 



WMS Hears Former Chaplain 

The Walton Baptist W. M. S. met 
at the church last Thursday for the 
regular monthly meeting. After Hie 
business session, a delicious covered 
dish lunch was served. 

After lunch Rev. Robert Oonnely 
gave an inspiring message. He was 
a Chaplain in the Army during the 
war and his work as Chaplain took 
(nim to all our Mission fields in Hie 
South Pacific and the Far East. 

He thrilled our hearts as he told 
of has experiences as a Chaplain, 
who was a real Missionary to all 
«ie natives, wherever he went, also 

^S 1 ^ ""nyW our soldiers to 
Uhrlst. 

Mrs. D. K. Johnson had the de- 
222S? 1, ^ d the Program was "How 
Christian Is America ?"— Pub Ohm 



A Son at Collins Home 

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Collins, Jr., 
of Fiskburg, are the proud parents 
of a fine 9-ipound son, born Feb 17 
at Booth Hospital. He has been 
named Michael Franklin. Mrs. Col- 
lins was formerly Miss Wllma 
Spaulding. 



The W. M. S. of New Bethel Bap- 
tist Church, Verona, met Saturday 
afternoon at the church for the reg- 
ular monthly meeting. The .busin- 
ess session was conducted by the 
president, Mrs. Areola Hayden. 

The meeting was opened with song 
for the year, followed by group re- 
peating the watchword. Mrs. Alice 
Chapman was selected for the In- 
termediate G. A. leader. Mrs. Gen- 
eva Fergerson, Junior G. A. leader. 
Mrs. Blanche ansom, Training School 
Chairman and Publicity; Stanley 
Ashcraft and Marion Waller, R, A. 
leaders. 

March 2nd was the day set for 
special prayer for Home Missions, 
announced by Mission Study Chair 
man, Mrs. ose HamiRlton. 

The program for the afternoon was 
led by Mrs. Susie Glore, topic, "How 
Christian Is America?" The devo- 
tional thoughts were given by Mrs. 
Gertrude Brewster. Others taking a 
part on the .program were Mesdames 
Lillian Stephenson, Alice Chapman, 
Rose Hamilton, Pattie Waller, Am- 
erica Sturdivent, Ura Roberts, Areola 
Hayden, Blanche Ransom. The group 
was dismissed with prayer by Mrs 
Allie Chandler. 



Square Dance Saturday Night 

A square dance will be given at 
the Walton American Legion Hall, 
Beaver Road, on Saturday ndght, 
February 25, 1950. Music will be 
furnished by the Gang from Verona. 



Judy Caldwell, Gharlene Mills and 
Emma Kelly, art students at Simon 
Kenton High school, carried away 
top honors in the 13th District High 
School Division of .the State Fire 
Prevention poster contest. 

The contest is sponsored annually 
by the State Fire Marshal as past 
of Fire Prevention Week. Though 
the contest is state wide, awards are 
also given for the best work in each 
of sixteen districts. Simon Kenton 
m in the thirteenth district, which 
includes all schools of Gallatin 
Boone, Grant, Kenton, Campbell and 
Owen and Pendleton counties. 

Judy Caldwell, a senior, won first 
place with a semi -abstract fire es- 
cape design in red and black ink on 
White. It carried the slogan, "Keep 
* ha * , fire escape safe." Charlene 
Mills s second prize winner, centered 
around an overloaded socket. Var- 
ious electrical appliances were rep- 
resented throughout the poster all 
connected to the same outlet. ' 

A neat green - shuttered white 
house, surrounded by dry leaves and 
a burning cigarette, with the slogan 
Watch that House—Douse That 

lace" ette '" W ° n Emma Kelly mTd 
Congratulations to these three 
pris They and the rest of the sen- 
ior high are students will be trying 
again for honors in the poster co* 

Zf*??"!?** 1 to Election with 
the State Speech Festival, Apri.1 8 



Walton (64) FG FT 

Johnson 2 

Meadows ,2 2 

Rice °3 o 

Ryan o 

Maddox _ 9 4 

Hall i 2 

Oheesman 6 1 

Cleek , 4 1 

Totals 28 10 

Florence (41) FG FT 

Markesbery 4 2 

Rowland 1 3 4 

McKibben 2 

Dinn 1 

Stansel 4 2 

England 2 2 

Totals 15 11 



PF 

3 


3 

. 3 



2 

3 

14 

PF 

2 
3 

1 
1 
1 

8 



TP 

4 
6 
6 


22 
4 

13 
9 

64 

TP 

10 
10 

4 

1 
10 

6 
41 



The Florence reserves 
opening game, 34-20. 

Walton (68) FG 

Johnson t 4 

Meadows 

Rice -^ 1 5 

Vest 4 

Ryan 1 

Grubbs 

Maddox 3 

Hall 4 

Cleek : 

Glacken 

Spegal 

Oheesman 4 

Shields 1 

Totals 26 



won the 



FT 

2 
2 
2 
2 

1 


2 


4 
1 
16 



Crittenden 

Dues 

Rex 

Jump _^. 

Jones 

Smallwood 



(51) 



FG 

_ 1 
- 
_ 
_ 
.2 



FT 

1 



2 

4 
3 

1 
11 



PF 

2 
3 



1 
1 






4 

11 

PF 

2 

3 

1 
2 

2 
5 
1 
2 
18 



TP 

10 
2 

12 

ia 
2 
1 

6 
8 
2 



12 
3 

68 

TP 
3 







6 


12 
IT 

4 

9 
51 



Bake Sale Saturday at CPS 

The Willing Workers class of the 
Walton Christian Church are spon- 
soring a bakery sale, Saturday, Feb. 
25th at the Community Public Ser- 
vice office, beginning at 10 a. m. 

Proceeds will be used for the sup- 
port of two orphan children at the 
Danville (Ky.) Home. Your patron- 
age will be appreciated. 



Henry 

Gayhart z. 4 

Cook 7 

Early j.- 2 

Rose 4 

Totals 20 

Walton-Verona won the reserve- 
team game 39-27. 

Final Game Friday 

The final game of the regular sea- 
son will be played on the Walton 
floor, Friday night, with the New 
Haven Tigers comjhg here for a 
Boone County Conference tilt— and 
then the fireworks— see you at S K 
next Wednesday night, when we 
play St. Henry. 



Spauldings Have Daughter 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Spauldlrug of 
FiskbuTg, Ky., welcomed the arrival 
of a lovely 8% -lb. daughter at Booth 
Hospital, Covington. February 13th. 
She has been named Deborah Ann. 
Mrs. Spaulding was formerly Miss 
Rosella Finnell. 



Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 23, 1950 



WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 



Entered as Second Class Matter 
- January 1, 1916 at the Pok 
_ 9? tU x »* Walton, Ky. 



Mark M. Meadows 
Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

S1.50 PER TEAR 
(In Advance) 



MEMBER 

KErfft/cKY PRES! 

As sociation , 

OkCAHlllb JAHVAtl.HH 



I INDEPENDENCE ~~| 



-—IS YOTJR SUBSCRIPTION PAID?— 

J>- .:■.:■■:■■ ■.■..•■V~- > -*~ . 



L J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

and 

OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 05,35 

Office Hours ... • 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Sandford Lee Roberts, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. S. L. Roberts of Indepen- 
dence, died Tuesday of last week in 
Booth Hospital. The funeral services 
were held at the Swindler funeral 
home, Independence, Thursday. He 
was only 27 years of age, but Hodges 
disease worked fast to take him a- 
way. He was a vrey popular, in- 
tellectual young man. The local 
Masonic lodge had recently installed 
him as Worshipful Master. His fri- 
ends were many, as indicated by 
the wals of the two rooms of the fun- 
eral parlor being banked with flow- 
ers. The burial was made at Erlan- 
ger. The sympathy of the commun- 
ity is extended the family. 

The W. M. U. of ithe Independence 
Baptist Church will hold their Week 
of Prayer program at the_chyroh on 
Tuesday," February 28 and Friday, 
March 3 at 11:30 a. m. All women 
of the church are urged to be pres- 
ent and to eat before they come, as 
no time will he taken for lunch. It 
is desired that the entire time be 
given to prayer and study. 

Mrs. Wiley E. Sims (p home from 
the Jewish Hospital ana tSoiag very 
well after a major operation. 

Billy Collins, Junior, has been 
down with the influenza, but is bet- 
ter. 

._ Clifford Lipscomb, who has.jbeejrj 
suffertftg'firom sciatic rheuTOaWsmyls 
down again. 

The i<><*- • - ~ - - ^parjrnent ambu- 
lance iK.-* JNpatlfasT week'to the 
home of Walter Beck, a farmer on 
Petty Road. He was found dead 
with a pistol wound in his MBit and 
in his temple. His wife Tep ©d that 
her husband had been fn poor 
health. The coroner pro^inced it 



suicide. This father leaved five chil- 
dren from the age of seven to college 
age. The son was taking a course 
at U. K. The funeral was held in 
the Swindler funeral home at Inde- 
pendence and burial was at Alex- 
andria. The community extends 
sympathy to the family. 

Socialism won in New York state 
in a recent Senatorial election. The 
issue was defined as "Dictatorship 
under the 'Welfare State' versus the 
'American' form of government 
Dictatorship, i. e. the Welfare State 
won. Bible news flashes of Decem- 
ber 1949, issue, make this comment, 
"It Is getting so no one can be elect- 
ed any more except the fellow who 
promises tojtake from the 'producer' 
all he earns and has and give it to 
the shiftless, squandering 'para- 
sites'." People have sunk to a low 
level when they will sell their lib 
erty for a flrejyhandout. Such people 
are "ripe" fW*dictatorship and will 
follow anybody, whether it be big 
Hitlers and Stalins or their little 
imitators. 

Marion Collins, Jr., of Fisgburg, 
was looking quite happy last Saitur 
day. It was learned that he was the 
father of a nine-pound baby boy, 
born in the hospital that morning 

Walter Dennis, father of - Robert 
Dennis, one of -the local* garage me- 
chanics, died* of a heart, attack last 
Saturday morning, a^jiis home in 
Silver Grove. F~ ~ ^Tolling mill 
worker, He leaves an irOTne .the wife, 
twins of eleven, and one grown son. 
Funeral services were held at the 
Silver Grove Baptist Church last 
Tuesday, with burial at Independ- 
ence. Sympathy of the community 
is extended the family. 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 

Cincinnati Stock Tarda 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market ln4he 
country. We hope you will 
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Reference: Ask the first 
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The pamsonage committee of the 
Independence Baptist Church * has 
tidvided itself into teams of twos and 
are planning to visit the member- 
ship for a. donation of cash. The 
committee Is as follows: George Ri- 
ley, chairman; Frank Cox, Alf B'- 
Hymer; J C. E. (McGraw, E. B. Swin- 
ford, J. C. Armstrong, Tom Elam and 
Clyde McVey. George Riley has been 
doing a little preliminary work. He 
told one of his friends that he was 
coming out to see him but he said, 
"Oh, I do not have any money, don't 
come!" The Irish was not to be de- 
feated and responded, "That doesn't 
make any difference, tie one of your 
old cows to a locust tree and I'll be 
out to see you!" 

Much interest was taken in the 
messages of the two Home Mission- 
aries, who visited the Independence 
Baptist Church last week. A book 
on missions is being taught each 
Sunday night from 7:00 to ,7:30. 

Which philosophy of government 
is better? Washington said, "It is 
impossible to rightly govern the 
world without God and the Bible." 
Lenin said, "Religion must be abol- 
ished! The best country is a God- 
less country. If religion' wfll vass 
out quietly, our attitude will be one 
of benevolent tolerance, but if it re 
sdsts, we will hasten its exit by vio 
lence, proportionate to its resist 
ance." 

Rev. A. *B. Calvin, pastor of the 
South Side Baptist Church, Coving 
ton spoke to the Men's Brotherhood 
meeting last Tuesday night on the 
subject of "The Sunday School." A 
pot-luck supper was enjoyed before 

ffl ir jwh — "'*""-& ""^i**^ • . r i 
One orSHe inemtiffi? of She St. 

Cecelia Church reported that due to 

crowded quarters of their school, 

they "are going to build a new home 

for the priest and use the present 

home for the teachers, thus relieving 

congestion in the church building. 

Elmer Wayman of Richardson 
Road is critically ill with heart 
■trouble. 

Eugene Schadler and Miss Geneva 
Armstrong were married recently 
and have started housekeeping near 
the F. H. Daugherty home here. 
These aire excellent young folk and 
congratulations are in order. 

Last Sunday night our local fire 
department made a follow-up run 
about 9:30 to the Taylor Mill fire 
house. The fire was on Edes Road, 
but our department did not have to 
go into action. „ 

Mrs; Clyde McVey has been sick 
with the influenza, but is out after 
about a week of intense suffering. 

Little Janet Callen, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Callen, in play- 
ing with some children last week, 
broke her leg and was taken to the 
hospital, but ds home now on iBank 
lick Road and doing nicely. 

In Henry county 115 homemakers 
have stenciled their names on their 
mail boxes. 

Fred Hicks of Rowan county has 
completed an eight-stanchion milk- 
ing parlor, which conforms to grade 
A standards. „ 




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New Shipment of Ladies' Cotton Dresses, "Joan Curtis 
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PAINTING 

Paper Hanging 

Also Steaming Off Wallpaper 

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Phone: JUniper 4084 
or Independence 6329 



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—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON. KENTUCKY 



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Independence, Ky. 



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856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 



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I 



Thursday, February 23, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 




WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship _____ n.oo a. m. 

B. T U 6:30 p . m . 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Frank Penick, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7..30 p . m . 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School ___ 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship n.oo a. m. 

Youth Fellowship 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. ml 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 

ST. PATRICK CHURCH. VERONA 
Rev. Henry A m Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month '___ 8:30 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of mojjth __ 10:00 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

4th Sunday of naontfa.-^ 10:00 a. m. 

5th SUM*.- <_th -___ 8:30 a. m. 

ALL ; SAINTS MISSION. WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
• 1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

4th Sunday of rrfonth 8:30 a. m. 

5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH* 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 

—Services Every Sunday — 

INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a.' m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U _ 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed. 8:00 p. m. 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 

J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday Sohool ________ 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Carl H. Justice, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service «____. 8:00 p. m. 

(First and Third Sundays) 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. • 

Sunday Sohool 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



Page Three 





International llill^raTTHI 
-jUJlUJ H Sunda7Scno.J U-on. n il 

DR. KENNETH J. FOREHAtt 



SCRIPTURE: Acta 15-36— lft-22; 1 Cor- 
Inthiana 5:9— 6:J0; II Corinthlam 6:11— 
7:1. 

DEVOTIONAL READING : I Chron- 
icle! 16:23-20. 



Satan's Throne 



Lesson for February 26, 1950 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship _-.* "*jjfcfti m. 
Christian Endeavor _____ 6:30 p. m. 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Don Sm-tih, Pastor 

Bible Sohool 1*0:00 a. m. 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday Sohool 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m. 



LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00*p. m. 

BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 




NEW BETHEL BAPTIST. VERONA 

Rev. R. f. DeMolsey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School ,____ 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m 

—Services Every Sunday— 



WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Grover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 

Fred McMillian, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

B. T. U 6:45 p. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. m, 



CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 

Walter Kidwell, Supt. 

Sunday School _'__ 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 

CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor — Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt. — Harvey Hughes 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship i 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday Sohool 10:00 a. 

Morning Services 11:00 a. 

B. T. U. 6:30 p. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. 7:30 p. 



m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 
m. 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington. Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 K-Ray 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



♦ 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



TH€Re IS NO SUBSTITUTE 

FOR AN INSURED 

SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

YOUR ACCOUNT is invited. Start with any 
amount; odd to it at any time. Yow'H discover 
friendly, personal service. 

And liberal dividends are credited every six 
months. Inquiries invited. 




FIRST FEDERAL loanassn. 

501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINGTON, KY. 



"T HOLD NO BRIEF tor him" is 
" a lawyer's expression often 
borrowed by other people. A law- 
yer who holds a brief for a man 
has been employed to represent 
him. It is his duty to present the 
man in the best light-possible. 

Now we know about the early 
church at Corinth 
from two sources : 
Luke and Paul. 
The book of Acts 
was w r i 1 1 en, 
among other rea- 
sons, to show that 
the Christian 
church, w far from 
being a subversive 
movement as its 
enemies c 1 a i m e d 
was a benefit to^ tr»» wosld. Of 
course this was' Uf.'' , v ****' T&ft 
was Luke's purpoS_Y ne " naturally 
omjtted as much of the church's 
shortcomings as he could, and 

played up the good features. 

• • * 

Church with the Lid Off 

Paul, on the other hand, writing 
to the church at Corinth (and to 
others as well), held no brief for 
them. He was not trying to praise 
them or to tell anybody how good 
they werq . 

He knew them intimately; he 

had indeed converted most of 

the members. 

His letters to Corinth, from which 
our lesson gives a small sample, 
shows us a church "with the lid 
off." 

• * • 

Where Satan's Throne Is 

yEARS AFTERWARD, another 
* Christian writer said of another 
church that they lived "where 
Satan's throne is." You might al- 
most have said the same thing of 
Corinth. It was a large commercial 
city; people from everywhere fun- 
neled into it. Like any city of this 
sort it had earned a reputation for 
wickedness of every kind— drink, 
liquor, gambling, women, cut- 
throat business, rotten politics— it 
was all there. Even in the easy- 
going Roman world, Corinth was 
notorious. 

Corinth was a sort of man- 
made jungle, like our own 
great cities today. It made a 
sort of test case: If the church 
could succeed in Corinth it 
could succeed anywhere. 
If the power of Christ could 
make new men and women out 
of the denizens of that great city, 
there wa3 no jungle, man-made or 
nature-made, where Christ could 
not go. Can men and women be 
Christian in the midst of a non- 
Christian, even anti-Christian 
world? 

• • • 

Our Pagan World 

PAUL'S ANSWER, of course, is 
* Yes: on one condition. You 
must take your pattern for living 
from Jesus, not from the world 
around you. The big problem at 
Corinth, which included all other 
problems, was the fact that the 
Christians there were acting too 
much like the people outside the 
church. Christians must be differ- 
ent! insisted Paul. This is not an 
echo of a bygone time. 

Our own world is a new Cor- 
inth. Even into the remotest • 
village, the most isolated' farm, 
the world of oar time pushes, 
in, by radio, movies, maga- 
zines and papers and advertis- 
ing, even by schools and clubs. 
And it is a pagan world. 
Take the movies alone, that fer- 
tile source of most young people's 
ideas. Hollywood's idea of mar- 
riage—a temporary affair till bore- 
dom do .us part; Hollywood's idea 
of a good time — liquor flowing 
free; Hollywood's idea of success 
—an immense house with an even 
bigger swimming pool. 

Not that there are no good mov- 
ing pictures; but in general what is 
made glamorous on a thousand 
screens is anything but a Christian 
world. 

« • • 

And Be Te Separate 

pAUL KNEW It is not practical 
r to have no contact with evil. 
He would not approve of Christians 
going into monasteries where they 
would henceforth see none but top- 
grade saints. Christians have to 
live in the world, even if they live 
where Satan's throne is. But Chris- 
tians ought to be different. 

The world says: Drink makes no 
difference; men of distinction all 
do it. The Christian knows better; 
Christ's man of distinction will 
keep himself clean. The world 
Bays: Let yourself go, follow your 
impulses, look out for yourself. 
The Christian knows better: he is 
one bought with a price. We that 
are strong ought to help the weak 
and not to please ourselves. The 
world says: Do as other people dol 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday Sohool 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U __ 7:00 p. m. 

Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-Bible Study Wed«_ 7:30 p.m. 

STAFFORDSBUHG CHURCH 
Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m. 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 
Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School -_ 9:30 a. m. 

Worship Service _. ; __; 10:30 a. m. 



Prices 
all can 
afford ! 



the Facilities, 
the Experience, 
and the Ability 
to give the 
Finest in funeral 
service 1 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

FUNERAL HOMES 

Walton, Ky. Florence, Ky. 

Phone 352 " Phone 193 




For A Rainy Day! 

Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as little as $1.00! 

Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KY. 



TF~-" > «_ST 
to 



PLACE ^ 



EAT 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave, 



""■■ 



DR. VtfAliTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

«■ —OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. - HEmlock 2088 



Uto 



£ 



SECURITY 




and • M 

• Jm 






ji A? 



The simple faith of this child It written all over her 
beaming little face. The awed expression, the clasped 
hands, and the prayerful eyes show without a shadow 
of a doubt that this small girl has been taught truths of 
the Christian Faith. 

Already she has been taken regularly to the services 
of the Church, habits which she will net likely break 
as she grows older. At night Mother tells her stories 
from the' Bible, and at bedtime she kneels reverently to 
pray before she falls asleep. ( 

A child with such training has been given the greatest 
insurance of happiness that parents can bestow. No 
matter what course her life may lead, she will always 
be able to rely upon her early teachings as her greatest 
source of comfort and direction. 

Only by giving your children the benefit of Christian 
training can you hope to bless them with security and 
happiness in the future. It is never too early or ton !•*- 
to begin. Take your children to Chun 



Linton's Barber Shop 
Walton. Kentucky 



THE CHUHCH FOB ALL . . . 
ALL FOB THE CHURCH 

__«£__!**_ *" ,h » buildi «ff of 

Without a strong Church, n«lth.r 

democracy nor civiliration can 
•unrtv.. Th. r . „. four ^ 

reams why .v.ry p.^. ^3_ 

chiuw. .__.. & ,?_£•,* 

For it, com » uni «r ond nation. (4) 

_*_,_" * a _* _* ,h » Chu «* "«.lf 
which n._d. hi. moral and _£ 

churi iUPP °, r '-, Plan «• 0° to 

»-_»■... £_• Ch *»" v — 

Mond_y.._f_ tthtw 
Tu«d_y. . _,„_. 

W.dn.id'yPs-lnu 
Thur.d«y._| lttn#w 

Friday. . . _,__, 

Ssturrf-- - . 



4 21-26 

I< 14 

6 38-45 

8 1-0 

4 17-2 J 




. V». 



■ware 

-orge or Small, See Po 



Florence Deposit Bank 

Florence, Kentucky 



» Hamilton and Jones 
Walton. Kentucky 

£ • • ^ _____ 

Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence. Kentucky 



Dixie Chevrolet Sales 
Phone Walton 95 



Dixie State Bank 

Walton. Kentucky 



Meador's Grocery 
Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables, Meats 

Walton & Readnour 
Cool - Feed ■ Seed Phone Walton 154 



Roberts Grocery 
Where You Get Quality and Price 



Community Public Service Co., Inc. 

, _ W alton. Kentucky 



l 



Page Four 



•v. 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday,, February 23, 1950 




Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Ferguson 
, spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Chiarles Ferguson of Verona. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Pennington had 

as Sunday guests, Mr. and Mrs. 

Jimmy Pennington and son Jimmy 

Wayne, and Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey 

• . Eokler. 

• • Mrs. Polly Rader of Hamilton, is 
visiting her son and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. Herman Rader. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hoffman and 
family were Sunday guests of Geo. 
Flynn and daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day had as 
Sunday guests, Mrs. Woodie Sowder 
of Covington, Mrs. Rella RichaTds of 
Covington, Mr. and Mrs. John Webb 
of Cincinnati, Mrs. Hannah Cooper, 
M. S. Caswell and Eart Day, all of 
Covington. 

Mrs. Leo F.lynn and children spent 
Sunday with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Summey ait Nicholson. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Earl Robinson, were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Harrison Robinson and children, Mr. 
and Mrs. Clifford Cook and children, 
Mr. and Mrs. "Bud" Robinson and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Robinson 
and children, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Coney, Miss Kathryn Robinson, Mrs. 
Edith Black, and Mrs. Ann Dudgeon. 

Mr. and Mrs. powers Conrad are 
spending two weeks at Hot Springs. 
Ark. ' 

. *-T^ e SW^ft -Wprkrv* <* gp -OIL the 
"• wwhurv. '•^rCnurch held their 

regular monthly meeting at the 
church Friday night, with Mrs.,,Gayle 
McElroy and Mrs. Claude Norman, 
hostesses. 

Mrs. Daisy Jack is visiting her dau- 
ghter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
H. Bertram, and family in Greenville, 
Ohio. 

Miss Mary Yealey, manager of the 
Artistic Beauty Shop, is convalescing 
at her home following an emergency 
appendectomy. 



Mrs. Leo Flynn was the Thursday 
luncheon guest of Mrs. Roy Lutes at 
Florence. Mrs. Lutes entertained a 
number of the past county officers of 
the Homemakers' Olubs. 

Mrs. Ora Stone attended the Foods 
Training class held a>t Florence last 
Thursday, for Homemakers. 

Mrs. Fanny Montgomery spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Porter and family of Verona. " 

Mrs. iMerill Clinkscales and chil- 
dren of WHliamstown, spent a few 
days last week with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Cook. 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Wood visit- 
ed Mrs. Wood's father and mother 
Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Good at Eng- 
lish, Ky. 

Mr. and (Mn-. Leonard_Cook, Jr., 
entertained the following guests at 
a televesion and canasta party last 
Friday evening: Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Rouse, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Snape and 
Mr. and Mrs. Billy Adams. 

iMr. and Mrs. W. H. Bertram and 
two children of Greenville, Ohio, 
were weekend guests of her sister 
and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Carpenter. 

Mrs. Maude Wilson of Verona, was 
a recent guest of Mrs. Bess Conrad. 

Mrs. J. T. Stone was the Monday 
night guest of Mr. and Mrs. John E. 
Stephenson. 

Mrs. Eileen Kent and two chil- 
dren spen{ Sunday at Indianapolis, 
Ind, „ a- ;*•£ - .-> 



Mr. and Mrs. Florain Lusby of St. 
Louis, Mo., are visiting his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Lusby. 

J. C. Harvey and Scott Jack of the 
New Haven community, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Bouse and Mrs. J. T. Stone were 
luncheon guests Tuesday of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. W. Rouse. 



'Mr. and Mrs. John Gault and Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnny Gauilt, Jr., attended 
the Historic Society meeting in Flor- 
ence, last Thursday night. 

It is estimated that the dairy bus- 
iness in Green county increased 164 
percent from 1947 to 1950. „ 



DR. PAUL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to express our apprecia- 
tion to those who have shown so 
much kindness to us during the 
death of our loved one. We especi- 
ally want to thank Rev. B. C. Gar- 
rett for his comforting words; Mrs. 
Grace Rice, Mrs. Bryan Rector and 
Mrs.. Kenneth Johnson, St., for their 
beautiful songs; also Chambers & 
Grubbs for their efficient service, 
and all those who sent flowers and 
cards. Your kindness and sympathy 
is deeply appreciated. 

Mrs, James Oheesman and 
Children; Mr. and Mrs. M. 
lt-8* R. Cheesman and family. 

SINCERE THANKS— , 

I wish to extend my sincere thanks 
and appreciation to the many fri- 
ends, neighbors and relatives for the 
cards, letters, flowers, fruit and visits 
received during my convalescence 
in St. Elizabeth Hospital and at 
home. I also want to thank the 
D. of A. Council for the beautiful 
■potted plant; the G. A. girls of the 
Baptist Church for their kind re- 
membrance, and assure each and 
every one their kindness shall never 
be forgotten. 

—Lacy Thornton 



There is more interest in the sheep 
business in Christian county than at 
any time in recent years. 




JOHN'S? 

ROSEDALE PEAS— No. 2 can 2 for 25c 

CRYSTAL WHITE SYRUP, Amazo— 1 »/, lbs. 10c 
PORK & BEANS, Your Brand— No. 2 can 2 for 25c 

NAVY BEANS 3 lbs. 27c 

NORTHERN TOILET TISSUE 3 for 25c 
SWEETHEART SOAP .... 4 bars 30c 

WE NOW FEATURE 

{ COLORED MARGARINE 

PARKERS COUNTRY STYLE SAUSAGE lb. 4& 
FRESH GROUND BEEF lb. 55c 

WEEKEND SPECIALS 

Snow Crop Frozen Peaches 24c 

Snow Crop Red Ocean Perch Fish 39c 





HENRY'S BOOTERY 

SHOES FOR THE FAMILY! 



Red Goose - Jumping Jacks 

Men's Good Work Shoes 

Boys' Dress Oxfords 



Ball Band Footwear 



35 HEAD OUTSTANDING COWS 
Imported from Canada - Grade and Registered 

At AUCTION 

TUESDAY, FEB. 28 - 10:30 A. M. 

I will sell at my barn located I 2 miles West of Frank- 
fort, and 8 miles East of Shelby ville, at Peytona, Ky., on 
U. S. 60, the following: 

A clean herd of outstanding high producing fresh and 
springer cows, 25 of which are imported registered Can- 
adian cows, with papers; they have plenty of breeding, 
type and style; these are large cows, and have extended 
pedigrees ; all are T. B. and Bangs tested, and were se- 
lected from some of Canada's better herds. 

Also 10 head of fresh and springer grade Canadian 
cows ;^ these cows are of good color, type and are good 
producers ; all cows, both gracfe. -»- i registered, are young 
from 2 to 5 years old ; eeJch tow will be sold with indi- 
vidual health sheets and calf hood vaccination certificate. 

If you are interested in registered cows of good blood 
lines and breeding, don't fail to attend this auction, as 
this is one of the nicest herds ever offered for sale in 
Shelby County. Sale held in heated Sales Pavillion. 
Catalogue on request. 

Your Inspection .Invited Any Time! . Terms Cash! 

EDWARD MASTERS . 

SHELBYVILLE, KENTUCKY 
Phones: Res., Waddy 2539; Barn, Waddy 2704 

Auctioneers: Hayden Igleheart and J. L. Coots 






Announcement of Sale of Sitton Farm 

SAT., MARCH 4 - 1:00 P. M. 

633 ACRES AT 

ABSOLUTE AUCTION 

Located in Pendleton County, short distance off State 
Highway 22, between Williamstown and Falmouth 

Selling to Settle Estate — Saturday, March 4th, 1 p. m. 

Farm has been in the Sutton family for a century or 
more, now being surveyed and will be divided into 3 or 
4 tracts. Watch for next week's papers for details? 

R. P. COLEMAN 

Real Estate & Auction Sales 
Florence, Ky. Highway 42 Phone Florence 148 



■ 



Property For Sale 

80 ACRES — 7-room modern house with full basement, furnace, 
hot and cold running water, laundry trays; combination barn, 
concreted for cows; good outbuildings; lot of nice road frontage; 
good location, on state highway; bus service; price $17,000. 

41 ACRES — Located on U. S. Highway; 6-room house, basement 
and furnace, fixed for two families; modern dairy barn, with 14 
cow stanchions, individual drinking fountains; one other barn; 
double garage, with living quarters; milk house; modern laying 
house; other outbuildings; all in bluegrass; this is something 
nice; price $25,000. ' . 



Next to Kroger's Super Market - Erlanger, Kentucky 



146 ACRES — 6 miles from Florence; 5-room house, combination 
barn, fixed for dairy, milk house, corn crib, smoke house, base- 
ment, chicken house, base 1.9, well watered; this farm will make 
money to subdivide; price 517,800. 

80 ACRES — 13 miles from town; 6-room house, barn, other out- 
buildings; price $7,500. 

200 ACRES — 9 miles from Walton; good 6-room house, feed barn, 
large tobacco garn racked off, number of good outbuildings, has 
lot of alfalfa and mixed hay, well watered; rented for 1950; to- 
bacco base 4.7 acres; purchaser to receive one-half of proceeds; 
price SI 8,000. 

10 MILES FROM FLORENCE— 5-room house with water in kitchen; 
garage, nice lot, good location; half block from U. S. Highway; 
bus service every hour; price 53,000. 

WALTON— 4-room house with bath, city water, garage; price $4,200. 

WALTON— 3-room house, two porches, large lot, one-half block 
from bus; price $2,750. 

GENERAL STORE— Located in good community, on U. S. Highway; 
large brick building with living quarters; running water, full 
basement, furnace; all stock and equipment; goes for $12,000; 
if purchaser does not want 2 adjoining lots, they can be sold 
separately; owner selling on account of health; this is a bargain; . 
purchaser may see records. ►' 

* R. P. COLEMAN 

Real Estate and Auction Sales 
FLORENCE, KY. HIGHWAY 42 PRONE FLORENCE 148 




u 



Come and See What Will Buy 

YOU WILL BE SURPRISED! 

—SALE STARTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25— 

DIXIE DRY GOODS STORE 

Erlanger, Kentucky 



Ha milton & Jones bvjte» y ou to sh OP i 

Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" 

t— - LOWEST PRICES— - 

" 9xl2"Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



t 



WIN A PflKTIAC! 



Excitement galore is in the 
air. That's because the Times- 
Star and WKRC, the Times-Star 
station, are giving away a 1950 
Silver Streak Pontiac . . . plus 
24 other luxurious gifts! 

How come? Why, so yon 
can help us celebrate WKRC's 
25th birthday! 

Here's how you can join in 
the celebration and win one of 
the valuable prizes. Simply 
identify the radio stars or pro- 
grams now appearing daily in 
the Cincinnati Times-Star. You'll 



find it's easy, because clues are 
given each day. Then tell us 
what your favorite WKRC pro- 
gram is. 

That's all. But it's enough 
to let 25 people win 25 truly 
magnificent awards, including 
that new Pontiac. 

Full details of this fascinat- 
ing new contest are appearing 
note in the Cincinnati Times- 
Star. Be sure to get a copy 
tomorrow without fail. yon 
may be the winner in the 
WKRC Silver Anniversary 
^"ntest. 



SOMETHING SPLENDID FOR THIS LENT 

Folk« of all faiths will be Interested In "Lenten Qnideposti," starting 
In the Tunes-Star A»h Wednesday, Feb. 22. A new ilorr each any by an 
outstanding person demonstrating the living religion eaeh knows as a 
personal experience. Forty stirring stories In all by to notable authors, 
incladlnr Eddie Rickeabaeker. Cecil B. de Mllle, Gene Tanney and J. Edgar 
Hoover. Read "Lenten Gaidepoett" now In the Tlmee-Star. 



Be sure to read tomorrow the 

CINCINNATI TIMES-STAR 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 
Phone HEmlock 2458 



Butler Bros. 



• • 



OUR FARM ALL MAN, SAYS. 



"TRY THE FARMALL C 



n 




"I'LL BRING IT TO YOUR OWN 
FARM... SHOW YOU WHAT IT 
CAN DO... LET YOU DRIVE IT. 
SUST PHONE FOR ME TODAY!" 

PARMALL-TIME-PROVED FOR IMPROVED FARMING 

BUTLER BROS. 

Phone Ind. 5053 Nicholson, Ky. 




I 



I 



I 



Thursday, February 23, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 



Baby Chicks 



Pullorum Passed N. H. Reds - White Rocks 

Member of Kentucky Poultry Improving Assn. 

Jamesway Equipment - Salisbury Remedies 

Provico Feeds 



Pollitt'S Hatchery & Supplies 



FLORENCE, KY. 



PHONE 159 



■ 




Build Your Future with 
America's Finest Men 



America's moat alert and ambitious young men are enlisting in 
the U.S. Army because they know that a military career offers a 
combination of opportunity and security seldom found elsewhere. 

Standards are high, but if you can measure 
np, a rewarding career with every opportunity 
for further education, travel and adventure can 
be yours. 

Build your future with America's finest men. 
Get the complete facts at your U.S. Army and 
U.S. Air Force Recruiting Station. Act now as 
enlistment quotas are limited. 

FALLER BLDG., 8th & Walnut Cincinnati, Ohio - DUnbar 2200 




/rs yoc/% , i ;„// w -my 

rtf/s FARM/ILL \CC/& 




AM# 



rwrtf 




FARMAU-- FIRST IN THE FlEUO 

BUTLER BROS. 

Phone Ind. 5053 Nicholson, Ky. 




Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



'V 




t 



Hs^MMHs^HKHSESI 

THE NEW D E LAVAL STERLING SPEEDETTE 

EgMBBlgMBg i Especially Designed 

for the Man Who 

Milks Ten Cows 

or Less! 

The new De Laval Sterling Speed- 
ette is designed especially for the 
man milking 10 cows or less. Your 
pocketbook can afford it— and you 
can't afford to be without it ! It will 
save up to 68 full working days a 
year on a 10-cow herd, save you 
countless steps, do the milking In 
half the time and produce more and 
cleaner milk for you. See it todayl 



«> spudettc 
vacua pimp 

— ntvifriquir.i 

oiling, dirtct-con- 

MtM to motor; 

110 V oc»r»tion. 



NEW SIAHDAID 
DE UMl STERLING 

4 SPEEOWHY UNIT 
-for bat milking, 
•islnt ctfmng. 
long Hit. 



'*«*m*iMktimmmM)^$d 



THEANSWER 



1 to You i Toughest 



Plowing Requirements! 




For a plow with 
plenty of brute 
strength . . . high 
lift for easy turning 
and transporting ... 
plus the extra clear- 
ance necessary for 
deep plowing in 
trashy conditions, 
you'll find a John 
Deere Truss-Framt 
Plow unsurpassed. 
Its many features 
make it a real leader 
in two-, three-, and 
four-bottom plow 
value. See as for 
full details ... soon. 



JOHN OEERE TRUSS-FRAME PLOWS 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 

110 PIKE STREET COVINGTON, KY. 



—ADDITIONAL^ 

Want Ads 



FOR SALE— Team of horses, 6 years 
old, and harness, well broke; 2 
tons Korean and Timothy hay; 
Oliver chidl steel beam plow, No. 
20, same as new. J. R. Worthing- 
ton, Walton. Phone 512X. 2t-7* 



SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stbne silo. 10% discount if ordered 
now! For prices and information, 
call A. R. Kwozalla, Erlanger, Ky., 
Route 4. Phone Florence 593. tf-49 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — It works, 
it pays, it gets calves. Sign up in 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay- 
lor, Walton 582. tf-45 

BOONE COUtfTY FARM— Near Ve- 
rona, Highway 16; 78 acres, 6-room 
modern home, full basement; large 
tobacco and stock barn; stripping 
room; corn crib; garage; up-to- 
date chicken house and brooder 
i — „„. | eJ1Ge( j i crossed fenced; 3 

. , l ¥ cisterns; 2-acre tobacco 

base; 300 young Pine-trees, 1,800 
Black locusf; all tractor land; 800 
feet frontage on Highway 16. J. R. 
Worthington, Walton, Phone 512X 

2t-7* 



FARMS WANTED— Small or large; 
we have a large list of customers 
waiting. For quick, reliable realty 
service, call us. Sallee Real Estate 
Co., 108 Locust St., Erlanger, Ky. 
Phone Dixie 7119. tf-4 



FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
First class work, guaranteed, good 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf.2 



FOR SALE — Kenton county farm, 
close In, good dairy or tobacco 
land, in bluegrass; house, barn. 
Owner, 142 Fairfield, Bellevue, 
Ky. 4t-5» 



FOR SALE— First, second and third 
cutting of alfalfa, bailed; timothy 
and clover; also timothy and clov- 
er, mixed. McBee Bros., Williams- 
town. Phone Williamstown 4192 
or 4073. 8t-4* 



VICK'S SALES & SERVICE 

South Main Street Walton, Kentucky 

PHONE: WALTON 18 or IND. 6495 

Wrecker Service 

(Day or Night) 
GULF GAS - OIL , - GREASING , 

FREE Grease Job with each 75 gal. 
of Regular or Ethyl Gas purchased! 



YOU BREAK ^EM. *-. We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. tf-46 



FOR SALE — 75 tons good quality 
mixed clover and timothy hay, 
70% clover. Ralph Jones, Pleasant 
Plain, Ohio, 30 miles Northeast of 
Cincinnati. . . 4t-6* 



FOR SALE— Two dairy cows, 6 and 
8 years old. Ohas. May, Sr., Dry 
Ridge, Ky. Phone Williamstown 
2677. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE— Kentucky U. S. approv- 
ed, pullorum passed chicks, White 
Rocks and N. H. Reds. Pollett's 
Hatchery & Supplies, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 159. Jamesway Equipment, 
Salisbury Remedies and Provico 
Feeds. . 4t-6 

SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE-hAII nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed ait reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest Independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf -l 

PLUMBING & HEATING— Repairs or 
new installations, furnace clean- 
ing and service'on stokers, gas or 
oil furnaces. Tri-County Heating 
and Plumbing Co. Florence 593. 

tf-49 



INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers It's 
members- 141$, " " ,-V-Jruto and 
truck insurant., ^argest in Ken- 
tucky), fire and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tf-2 

FOR SALE— Team of work horses, 8 
years old. G. R. Epperly, Bullock 
Pen Road. Phone Ind. 6696. 4t-8* 



LADIES' RUBBER Barn Boots, $1.99, 

broken sizes. Henry's Bootery, 

"Shoes for the Family," next to 

Kroger Super Market, Erlanger. 

, lt-8 

FOR SALE— Four purebred Angus 
bull calves, 1 years old. Cloyd 
Kannady, Verona, Kyr 2t-7* 



MASTER MIX 

lA COMPLETE 

vJw-'- CONCENTRATES 

2SE- ind 

STRAIGHT FEF^S 



*>'- 






Bring In 250 lbs. Corn and Mix with 100 lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig Starter at a low cost of only $3.15 per 100 lbs. 

Walton Feed Mill 

Incorporated 
WALTON, KY. ." PHONE 57 




FOR SALE— Fordson tractor, in A-l 
condition. Jake Lindsey, Walton, 
Route 2. Phone Florence 599. lt-8* 



WORK WANTED-<By lady and dau- 
ghter; housework or washings by 
day. Clara Rider, 62 High Streefr 
Walton. it-8* 



FOR SALE — Team of work horses, 
cheap— -$150.00. Ind. 5064. Old 
Kentucky Home Farm, Nicholson, 
Ky. 2t-8 



FOR THE BEST in Electric wiring- 
Call John T. Campbell, Walton 157. 
Trouble calls day or night. 4t-5* 



BABY CHICKS, AAAA Grade Rocks, 
Reds, Wyandottes, Orphingtons, 
Australorps, Leghorns, Anconas. 
Also special table grade chicks, 
no sex or breed guaranteed and 
brooder plans $6.95 per. 100. Pre- 
paid. From U. S. Approved Pul- 
lorum Passed Flocks. Breeder plans 
without chicks for making oil ox 
electric brooder to raise 50 to 200 
chicks to fryers $2.00. Hoosier, 
716 West Jefferson, Louisville, Ky. 

tf-7 



*— 




Due to high water, the home fur- 
nishings leaders of the Dundee 
Homemakers Club in Ohio county 
traveled 94 miles to attend a train- 
ing school. 



GUARANTEED 
REPAIR SERVICE 

— on all makes of — 
Washers, Wringers, Irons, 
Sweepers, fans, Toasters, 
, Water Pumps - Fire Ex- 
tinguisher Sales & Service. 

JOS. F. BECK - Ind. 7497* 

Independence, Ky. 



There Is (ART) In A RTISTIC 

—FREE CALL & DELIVERY— 
16 South Main St. Phone 144 Walton, Ky. 



Fur Coats Cleaned & Glazed 

Altering Invisible Reweaving . 

Relining Dyeing 

Leather and Suede Jackets Refinished Like New 
Hats Cleaned and Blocked 

Quality Work . . . Guaranteed' 
—All Garments Insured — 



I. C. GAINES- 



-Prop. 



-DAVE WORKMAN 



9 



RAY HALL 

Manufacturing Optician 

Doctor's Optical Prescriptions 

Accurately Filled, Broken 

Lenses Replaced. Expert 

Optical Repairing 

122 PIKE ST. COVINGTON 
HEmlock 1992 



— DEAD STOCK- 
REMOVED PROMPTLY 
Horses, $2.50 - Cows. $2.50 

Hogs, 25c cwt. 

According to Size & Condition 

Call Otis Headnour 

WALTON 178 

or Butter 6901. coUectl 

Griffin Fertilizer Co. 

Home Owned & Operated 



Pontiac Trade-in Sale 

Reconditioned - Guaranteed 

'49 Pontiac "6" sedan; Hydramatic, 2-tone grey $1995 
'49 Chevrolet de luxe sedan coupe; looks new $1595 
'48 Oldsmobile "6" Hydramatic, 2-Door . , 



'46 Chevrolet station wagon; like new 
47 Dodge black de luxe sedan 



x. 



i . $1695 
. $1095 

$1295 
'46 Pontiac 4-door sedan; grey, special low price $1095 

46 Ford super de luxe maroon club coupe/ unusual $895 

'41 Pontiac, black 2-door, 6 cylinder . . . \ $695 
'39 Dodge club coupe . $395 

'37 Ford Fordor sedan, very clean .... $295 
'47 Alma House Trailer, 24-ft, Frigidaire, range $1595 

Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 



^ TERMS TO SUIT! 



UP TO 24 MONTHS TO PAY! 



Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Public Sale 

Having sold my farm through the Harry F. Johnson 
Auction Co. and going into the grocery business, I will 
sell by Tools, Stock, etc. 

1 MILE NORTH OF MORNING VIEW, KY. 

Sat., Feb. 25 



1:00 
p.m. 

Team of good horses and harness; 3 Holstein heifers, 
1 year old; bull, 8 months old; 1 948 Ford tractor, plows, 
harrow, cultivator, side mower, pullies, belt, saw, jack, 
chains, weed spray all tractor tools; silo cutter; 2-horse 
corn planter; new sled; iron wheel wagon; hay bed; 
John Deere mower on rubber; 60-tooth harrow; hillside 
plow; Rastus plow; hay rake; hoes, forks, and all kinds 
of small tools; 3,500 tobacco sticks; some loose lumber; 
milk vat and heater; 10 ten-gallon cans; dining room 
suite, 9-piece, almost new; 2 beds and springs; sausage 
mill; glass churn; good coal range; girl's bicycle; new 
door; 3 tons baled soybeans; tobacco press; some cam, 
and other items too numerous to mention. 

ioe Finneil 

Owner — Phone Ind. 6899 

HARRY F. JOHNSON 

Real Estate & Auction Sales — Phone Ind. 6196 

CARL JUSTICE, Clerk 



Public Sale 

Saturday, Feb. 25 

At 10:00 A. M. (EST) Near LENOXBURG, KY. 

Having sold my farm through Rel C. Wayman and 
Sons and John C. Simpson, agent, I will sell at public 
* auction at my home located on Eden Ridge, 2 miles from 
Lenoxburg, the following: 

FARM TOOLS— Ensilage cutter, complete with pipe, type F In- 
ternational; Milwaukee wheat binder; wheat drill, McCormick;- 
cutting harrow, Osborne; 4 five-shovel cultivators; two-horse cut- 
ter plow; Rastus and hillside plows, Syracuse; hillside plow, Reece- 
one-horse cutter; corn drill; John Deere manure spreader, new : 
hay tedder; 12-ft, hay nake; wagon, box bed, hay frame; stove and 
pipe for stripping room; lot loose lumber; pinch bar; 2 tarpaulins- 
tobacco press; log chair; platform scale; half barrel black paint: 
5 sacks cement; 3 silo pickets, 16 ft.; extension ladder, 32 ft.; lad- 
der, 25 ft.; fence battery; bunch hay ropes, pullies, fork; set wash 
vats; ten-gallon can; 2 wheelbarrows; slip scraper; grindstone- 

2 A" harrows; 27 steel fence posts, 8 ft.; 2 bull wheels for binder : 

3 mowing machine Wheels; 2 hand tobacco setters; bench vise- 
large monkey wrench; seed sower; sickle grinder; set sled soles- 
lot large iron pipes; tobacco bed burner; pitohworks, shovels and 
other small tools; new cider mill; iron kettle, stand; lot locust 
posts; lot metal chicken coops; Targe brass kettle stirer; 2 lawn 
mowers; 2 stepladders; 2 ten -gallon stone jars; twenty-gallon stone 
jar; 2 wood churns; lot odd paints; 3 gallons aluminum padnit; 
flame thrower or wood killer. ' 

FEED— About 30 bushels corn; about 400 bales straw; 8 or 10 
tons loose hay. 

FURNITURE— -.Bedroom suite, old; odd dresser; iron bedsprings; 
2 feather. beds, mattress, other bedding; 3 white chairs; rocker; 
blue enamel oil heater; gasoline cook stove; 2 small stmands; set 
of curtain stretchers; piano; music cabinet with 75 rolls; 4 wool 
rugs, star carpet, scatter rugs; davenport; some straight oh aims; 
kitchen cabinet; dining table and 4 chairs; Home Comfort stove; 
dishes, cooking utensils; clocks; linoleum on kitchen floor, and 
other things too numerous to mention. 

ANTIQUES — Coffee mill; set andirons, fireplace; lot of picture 
frames; 2 chests of drawers; hall tree, over 150 years old, hand 
carved in Germany; large round table; lamp; washstand. 

TERMS: CASH! 

Mrs. Carl Ernst 

Auctioneers: Mitchell Hiles and Cecil Wayman 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



STAFFORDSBURG 



Had a good number out for Sun- 
day school. Let's make it 100%. 
Everyone on the roll come out and 
bring your neighbor. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hanna made a 
birthday dinner for their grandson, 
Jimmy Hanna of Latonla, Sunday. 
His anniversary was Monday, but of 
course he was in school /then. We 
wish him many happy returns. 

The neighbors were much surpris- 
ed last week to learn that L. J. Rapp 
had measles. He seems to be doing 
as well as can be expected. 

We have been having interesting 
and helpful prayer meetings on Wed- 
nesday evening. Come and let us 
all unite to forward the work of the 
church and study God's word to- 
gether. 



CONCORD ROAD 



Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hughes of 
Concord and James Whitson of Sher- 
man, spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Edrington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Robinson 
have opened their new store for bus* 
iness, just above Goijpord Church on 
Highway 16. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Lamn spent Sun- 
day with their daughter and family 
of Erlanger. 




J 



ame 



s 



THEATER 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

FRI. & SAT. FEB. 24-25 

Jimmy Lydon - Penny Edwards 
—in — 

"TUCSON" 

—PLUS SECOND FEATURE— 

Monte Hale - Paul Hurst — in 

"Prince of The Plains" . 



SUN. & MON. FEB. 26-27 

Walter Pidgeon - Ethel Bairry- 

more - Peter Lawford and 

Janet Leigh — in 

"THE RED DANUBE" 

TOE. & WED. :: FEB. 28- -MAR. 1 

Gregory Peck - Anne iBaxter 
— in — 

"YELLOW SKY" 

—All Gents Admitted Free— 




When The Crash 

Comes — Be 

Protected 






, *54viomobih 
wtutual Insurance 
j^r Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON, KY. 



For the Best In Heating 
J araan Heating Service 

WALTON ... 524 

Engineered Heating— Coed, OIL 

Gere Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



STURGEON 
Electrical Service 

—Wiring of All Kinds— 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 
—Phone 71 or 1396— 

BsssstflsaBsa^BMsasssai 



Thursday, February 23, 1950 



Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Gre^nwell of 
Erlanger were visiting tlheir daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Fred Hamilton, Mr. Ham- 
ilton ind children, Sunday. Jim 
Bob went home with tihem to stay 
until Monday. 

The Homemakers of Concord and 
Napoleon met together last Thurs- 
day. They had a good meeting and 
a nice time together. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson spent 
Sunday with ihheir son, Oharles, and 
wife of Walton. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Hughes attend- 
ed the sale at Morning View, Satur- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Greenwell 
and Jim Bob Hamilton were calling 
on Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Edrington, a- 
while Sunday afternoon. 



i BEAVER LICK 

t—l — l^ f — ■■■■■I II I1I M 



Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Slayback and 
family had as their weekend guests, 
her brothers, Paul and Robert 
Weaver, of Louisville. 

The Rev. and Mrs. V. V. Hill and 
family called on Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Baker, Jr., and family Friday of last 
wee it. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore and 
■ssn^oalled on Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Houston of Florence, Sunday night. 

1 ^ 

NOTICE— CONCERNING 
THE WALTON CEMETERY 

It was voted unanimously that 
there shall be no more burials at 
theWaltoh Cemetery on Su^day^.. 

Also any company^. _ .'.Htrfh*" 
ing to erect monuments must con- 
tact sexton before erecting same. 

By order of Walton Baptist Church, 
January 18, 1950. 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Moderator 
Bryan Rector, Church Clerk 
3t-6 

One hundred percent of the home- 
makers in Johnson county made 
kitchen improvements after lessons 
on the subject in their clubs. 

A flock of 510 crossbred Hampshire 
and Barred Rock hens owned by El- 
mer Moore of Madison county laid 
an average of 25.7 eggs a bird in 
one month. 



GRRNT 

^ hi iams rowN.Ky 



MS 2020 



SATURDAY ONLY :: FEB. 25 

2 ACTION HITS 2 

hit no. 1 

Johnny Mack Brown — in 

'TRAILS END" 

hit no. 2 
Donald Barry — in 
"LIGHTNIN' IN THE FOREST" 



2 DAYS . . . STARTING SUNDAY 

BOb RHONDA 

HOPE-FLEMING 




Utt«MV^ffl-Mint«n-ffiBM!! 



■aOK ■ 0...,im ., ALEXANDER HALI 




TUE. & WED. :: FEB. 28 - MAR. 1 



Hasty 

Heart 



fTJi^WAMWBMBl 



THUR. & FRL MAR. 2 ■ 3 

2 BIG HITS 2 

—Hit No. 1— 

Betty Hutton-^in 

* "RED HOT AND BLUE" 

"—Hit No. 2— 

Tim Holt— in 

"RUSTLERS" 



Tractor Tires 

REPAIRED and FILLED with DILUTION 

We are now equipped to do expert 
Tractor Repairing and Filling. 

CALL WALTON 38 

B-M SALES & SERVICE 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 



Dairy, Tobacco and Stock Farm 



AUCTION 

Saturday, Feb. 25 



AT 12:00 NOON—FAST TIME 



Near Mt. Zion - Grant County 



Dairy Herd and Farm Equipment to Be Sold 



Two Sets of Buildings 



148 acres, located near Mt Zion. on the ML Zion and Crittenden Pike, in the best farming sec- 
tion of Grant County, with grade A dairy bringing in approximately $300.00 per month; three-acre 
tobacco base. This farm has a lot of good tobacco land, all locust land, five acres original timber, 
approximately 30 acres alfalfa, only four acres cultivated this past year. Farm is well watered — 
four ponds, one stocked with fish, two cisterns, and a creek. Approximately 60 acres ridge land; 
extra good tobacco barn on concrete foundation, feed barn with hay fork, a new milk shed with 
stanchions for 13 cows, new milk house, two dwelling houses, two garages, stripping room and other 
outbuildings. 

Livestock and Farm Implements 

In order to settle a partnership, A. J. Jackson and I will offer for sale 14 bead of extra good milk 
cows, including 5 registered Brown Swiss. Jerseys and Holsteins; 15 head of registered Polled White- 
face cattle, excellent blood lines; 2 extra good brood sows and 12 shoots; 5 head of good young 
work horses; also farming tools, including a disc harrow, 2-horse tobacco setter, mowing machine, 
hay rake, tobacco sticks, and other items too numerous to mention. 

—THE FARM WILL BE SOLD PROMPTLY AT 1 P. M.— 

CASH PRIZES TO BE GIVEN AWAY! 

Attend and Win A Cash Prize! Easy Terms! 

You Don't Have To Bid or Buy To Win A Prizel 



R. L Vincent, 



Owner of Farm 



R. L. Vincent and A. J. Jackson,* Owners of the Personal Property 



Thursday, February 23, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Seven 



BABY CHICKS 

$ 1 3.50 per 1 00 

Licensed and Approved by Kentucky Department of Agriculture 



OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 
WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 
POULTRY LITTER - REMEDIES 

Mi 

* TUXEDO FEEDS 




Garden' Seed 



Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 



INDEPENDENCE R. 1 



Ronald Losep will be the speaker 
for tine layman's service, which will 
be held at 11 a. m., Sunday at Che 
Staffordsburg church, Feb. 26. The 



pastor, Rev. Wheary, extends a spec- 
ial invitation to all who can come, 
and give this young man a good 
hearing. All are welcome. 

We were glad to see L. J. Rapp out 
to church services Sunday, after be- 
ing quite ill the past week with the 
measles. 

We are also glad to learn Mrs. 



I 



EXPERT 
WASHER 
REPAIR 

Any Make 

Pv&lbr All 
Popular Makes 

Just Give Us A Call 
DIXIE 7113 




Lucille Webb is still improving from 
a seridus illness at Booth Hospital. 
We wish her a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Billy Rich are re- 
ceiving congratulations over the ar- 
rival of a little son. Both mother 
and son are doing nicely. 

Rev. and Mrs. Roy Martin and little 
son of Lexington, spent the weekend 
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
J. Barnett. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harley Hanna and 
son and Mrs. Earl Hanna called on 
Mr. and Mrs. Shaler Marshall and 
little daughter, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dawson Ballinger are 
expected home the latter part of this 
week, after spending a couple of 
months dn Arizona; "" 



I 



ic 



r 



PAINT LICK 



COVINGTON 



HAGEDORN'S 



856 Dixie Highway 



Erlanger, Kentucky 



WILL Y0MP 3REAW 




Dreams can be so beautiful — and seem so real. Then 
suddenly, with a puff, they're gone. 

BUT your dream of srjrhe day owning a farm debt- 
free need not be a vision which disappears — you can 
make jka reality ! 

Get a firm, secure hold on your future — on the farm 
you've dreamed of owning outright — by financing it 
through your local National Farm Loan Association, 
with a Federal Land Bank Loan. 

A Federal Land Bank Loan gives you all these worth- 
while advantages: j 

# A low interest rate . . •. only 4 % , 

# Long-term ... up to 40 years, 

# Small semi-annual payments, 

# No appraisal fees, 

# No renewal commissions, 

# No penalty on PRE-payments, 

# Leniency in times of stress, 

# Cooperative ownership of your source of credit. 

Call, Write or See 

CARL SHERIFF, Secretary-Treasurer 

Williamstown & Boone County National Farm Loan Association 

WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. PHONE 2861 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

tfmUriTY? CORP. 

* ** *^ *^ * • 427 Madison Ave., Gov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



n-*»AR¥.Y Store 

5th and MADISON 

FOR MORE THAN 

27 Years 

WE'VE ALWAYS SOLD 

Good 

Work 

Shoes 

We fit small feet, large feet 
narrow feet, wide feet I 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

STORE 

508 MADISON AVENUE - 
COVINGTON 



Mr. and Mrs. Basil Rider were the 
Monday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Hopperton and daughter. 

Mrs. Gilbert Beall and little son 
retuuwd home after a week's visit 
wifln herSumt, Helen Densler, and 
son and grandmother, Lula Sisson. 

Sympathy is extended to Will 
Baraes-wrrd ch#d*en in the passing 
of Gertie Barnes; also to her father, 
Will Hendren. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie El- 
liston of near Verona, a baby girJj 
named Cecelia Atin. 

Sorry to hear of Mrs. Allen Morris 
of Warsaw, being ill, 

Cecil Rider called on Dickey Dens- 
I ler, Monday night. 

Mrs. Alice Densler and son, Wil- 
■6on, called on Mrs. Helen Densler and 



Little Linda Hopperton spent a 
few days last week with her grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Basil Rider, as 



Henry Barton called on his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. John Barton, on 
Friday. 

TheG. A.'s of Paint Lick entertain-: her mother has been ill with la- 
ed with a play and coronation at the grippe, 
church, Sunday night. , Mr. and Mrs. Luther Sutton were 

We welcome to our midst Mr. and visitors in Covington, Friday. 
Mrs. Sile Rider, who aje moving to \ Mr. and Mrs. Jake Rider and fam- 
our neighborhood. jily entertained guests Sunday. 



Cfoose ]6ctr7F#cfbr 



*«■ 



uvuwj ^Pa'rker of Union spent the 
weeknd with Cecil Rider. 

C. L. Noel and daughter, Mrs. Gil- 
bert C. Beall, were business visitors 
in Warsaw, Thursday. 

Mt. and Mrs. Leonard Smith and 
family were Saturday guests of his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Smith, 
and daughter Jo Ann. 



DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

613 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday, 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 




J 






FARMAU.- FIRST IN THfc TlCLD 
Calvin Cress & Sons 

BURLINGTON, KY. PHONE 79 




Chevrolet alone 
in the low-price field gives you all that's beautiful . . 
all that's thrilling ... all that's thrifty ! 



i> 




The Styleline Da Lux* 4-Door Sedan 

Ml 



FIRST... and Finest... at Lowest Cost! 



-——■■—■ \ 




CHEVROLET 



^% 




\Yes, you can expect the new 
standard of powerful, dependable 
low-cost performance from the 
1950 Chevrolet .' .- . just as you 
can look to it for the new standard 
of beauty, driving and riding ease, 
and all-round safety. 

Iff the only low-priced car 



offering you a choice of the finest 
standard or automatic drive and 
the finest performance with econ- 
omy from two great Valve-in-Head 
engines . . . plus all the other 
features listed here. 

Come in. See Chevrolet for 1950- 
first and finest at lowest cost! 



Chevrolet — and Chevrolet alone— bringt you all these advan- 
tages at lowest cosfl NEW STYLE-STAR BODIES BY FISHER 
. . NEW TWO-TONE FISHER INTERIORS . . . CENTER-POINT 
STEERING AND UNITIZED KNEE-ACTION RIDE . . . CURVED 
WINDSHIELD WITH PANORAMIC VISIBILITY . . . BIGGEST OF 
ALL LOW-PRICED CARS . . . PROVED CERTI-SAFE HYDRAULIC 
BRAKES . . . EXTRA-ECONOMICAL TO OWN, OPERATE AND 
MAINTAIN. 

fower^M £5S2S£* 

Combination of Power giide Transmission and 105-h.p. 
Engine optional on De Luxe models at extra cost. 



AMERICA'S BEST SELLER . . . AMERICA'S BEST BUY I 



DIXIE CHEVROLET SALES 



Phone 95 



Walton, Ky. 



\ 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 23, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION ^W r 



Classified advertising rate is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash in advance. 



FOR SALE— 1938 Ford Tudor sedan. 
Inquire at Beighle Bros. Grocery 
Phone Walton 25. 2t-7* 



LOST or STRAYED— Fox Terrier dog, 
male, black and white, tail re- 
cently cuf -off, about 2 months old. 
Three little boys want his back 
awfully bad. O. J. Struve, Wal- 
ton, Ky. lt-8 



FOR SALEe-Team 9-yeaT-old mares, 
and good set tug harness; or will 
trade for good pick-up truck. Vir- 
gil Whaley, 14 Locust, Walton. 

2t-8* 



FOR SALE— Gasoline "South Wind;* 
heater, $10; electric compressor 
and paint sprayer, $35; 30-inch 
blower, $30; car radio, standard for 
•42 -'48 Ford, $35. Glenn Stevens, 
Route 2, Box 314, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 419. 2t-7 



FOR SALE— F-30 Farmall tractor on 
rubber; model "B" Farmall with 
2-A plow; also 2-row cultivator; 
first" class condition. Calvin Cress 
& Son, Burlington, Ky. 2t-7 

FOR SALE — 8 -room modern home on 
High Street, Walton; full base- 
ment, furnace, hot and cold runn- 
ing water, cabinet sink, wall cab- 
inets. T. M. Vest. 2t-7* 



FOR SALE— Two yearling Hereford 
bulls, ready for service; 14 head of 
sheep and one buck. James B. El- 
liston, Verona. 2t-8* 

WANTED — Someone to raise 9/10 
acre tobacco, and 3 or 4 acres of 
cdrn, on shares; located on Wal- 
ton - Nioholson Highway. Phone I 
Ind. 6392. 2t-7* 



FOR SALE — DeLaval cream separ- 
ator; 1-horse corn drill with fer- 
tilizer attachment; 5-shovel" cul- 
tivator; 1 -shovel plow. W. P. Rob- 
inson, Walton. Phone 852. 2t-7 



LOOK FOLKS— 100 White Leghorn I 
cockerels, $3.00. First come, first! 
served. A bargain. Fine for broil- 
ers. Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, Win- 
ton & McKelvey Roads, Mt. 
Healthy, Ohio. lt-8 



FOR SALE — Large mare mule, 4 
years old, work anywhere; wood- 
wheel wagon, box bed, side board 
and 14-ft. nay frame; 2-horse 
mowing machine, cuts well; all 
priced reasonably. Raymond H. 
Baker, Verona, Ky. Phone Glen- 
coe 2798. 2t-7* 



j £ 



FOR SALE— No. 1 and mixed hay, 
baled. Dance Bros., Walton. Ph. 
514 or 926. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— 1946 Reo truck, S-ton 
tandem, 20-ft. flat; owner will fi- 
nance and furnish regular haul- 
ing to reliable party. Glenn 

■■- f '"«"w. Rfxute,?, Box 314, Flor- 
et*. l ':>neUM.9. 2t-7 



STARTED CHICKS at Bargain Prices! 
Thousands on hand. All breeds. 
One week old, $13.90 per 100i two 
. weeks old, $17,90; three weeks old, 
$22.90. Plenty, of feed, brooders and 
poultry supplies. Come to Che 
hatchery and see these bargains. 
Vicitors welcome. -Mt. Healthy 
Hatcheries, Winton & McKelvey 
Roads, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. Phone 
'^n**''Wv lt-8 



FOR SALE— Fryers, dressed or on 
foot. Mrs. Ethel SheppaTd. Phone 
Walton 1813. lt-8* 



FOR Sxn&±new S-KnjtZtiouse, large 
basement, furnace, 1 acre ground, 
on Wayman Drive, cheap. Hez 
Durr, Independence, Ky. 2t-8 



BABY CHICKS— Special Sale for Sun- 
day and Monday, ONLY. 1 electric j 
brooder, 100 baby chicks and 100 
pounds feed, all for $24.90. Real 1 
Bargain. Don't- miss it. Mt.j 
Healthy Hatoheries,' Winton and 
McKelvey Roads, Mt. Healthy, 
Ohio. Phone Jackson 9354. lt-8 



CONRAD HARDWARE! 



FOR SALE— Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year*. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. tf-1 



FOR SALE: — Hay,, straw ~wn 
alfa, mixed hay, timoiny, ~wn 
or oat straw. Russell Klein, 
Morning Viey, Ky. Phone Ind. 6427 

6t-5* 



Hamilton & Jones 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



Invites You to Shop! 






The Capehart Prelude $279.95 

with PofotaMO (twill in atrial) 

NOW 

TELEVISION 

with 2 Great Exclusive* 

Exclusive Capehart Tone 

brings television to life! 

Exclusive Polatron* Tube 

brings new clarity to every 
image! 

SEE... H CAR CAPEHART TODAY I 

Prices start at $239.95 



Wf 

To Prove You Can't Match a 

FRIGIDAIRE 

Master Model for 1950 



■■■-'-' ■:V-.'."'.'."''":7:V: : : : :': : : : :> ; 



Service on all types of 
household electric appli- 
ances by Hall's Electric 
and Appliance Service lo- 
cated in store basement. 



Immediate 
Delivery 




Monthly Terms 
If Desired 



Wherever you live— whatever 
the size of your family, kitchen 
or budget— be sure to see the 
new Frigidaire Refrigerators 
for 1950. See the complete 
line of sizes from 4 to 17 cu. ft. 
— see all the reasons why your 
No. 1 choice is America's No. 1 
Refrigerator, FRIGIDAIRE! 

NEW gold-and-white"target" 
latch and trim 

NEW Super-Storage design 
with full-length door on larger 
models 



NEW improved Meter-Miser 

NEW shelves are all-alumi- 
num and rust-proof 

NEW split shelf allows room 
for large, bulky items 

NEW swing -down shelf for 
butter, cheese, small items 

NEW all-porcelain Twin Hy- 
dra tors that stack up 

NEW all-porcelain Meal 
Storage Tray 



■*■ V/OU lkW Xi JLlXvUl and this is going to be a great year. 
Just as the years we have left behind us while living in and around Walton. It is 
a small, country town, but I like it. don't you? We want you to visit Conrad Hard- 
ware this year every time you want to loaf or buy something or even borrow. We 
try to keep a good fire, plenty of seats, and lots of ice water. We. I mean Ray. 
Chick and Powers, do now and always try to give the best of service. 

We have added a drill press to our work shop to drill holes in steel for you, as 
we carry flat, round and angle soft steel bars. We also have an electric pipe' 
threading machine and carry all sizes of galvanized pipe and fittings, Vs" to 2". 
Do you want to wire your barn or house or put in some extra floor plugs? We have 
all the material. Do you need some new window shades, any size? .We cut them 
off for only a dime. You always need to replace the wom linoleum rug with a new 
one. either 9'xl2', 12*xl2' or 12'xl5'. Every person on a rural route needs their name 
on the mail box. We will put it on one side for $1.00 or both sides for $1.75. This 
name plate is an aluminum strip with baked black enameled letters, to bolt on 
your box— or we will sell you a new box and put letters on It. 

When you need a new range to cook on. we have some of the best. In electric 
it is Perfection and Gibson; in gas it is Perfection. Maytag and Vesta; in kerosene 
it is Perfection, Boss or Quick Meal. When you need a coal range, always buy 
Knox Mealmaster, Brown or Red Mountain. 

We have added a small line of farm tools, such as Cobey all-metal tractor 
manur - *t* ^Massey- Harris horse dr.: '"._ ^ ^spreader, Vulcan 12-16 horse 
drawn disc Harrow, rubber tired wagon tractor hitch. Massey- Harris, Bemis, Tiger 
and New Holland tobacco setters. Chicken raising is a profitable business this year 
with Jamesway oil and electric brooders; also those sanitary Jamesway feeders 
and fountains. If you raise chickens profitably, you have to keep them warm and 
have clean food for them. For those who do not want to work, or do not have to, 
we have a good stock of fishing tackle, guns and rifles. 

For the ladies, who will soon start housecleaning and redecorating, we have 
that good Bolce paints and enamels; also Flozotone cosine water mix paint and 
that wine finish Interior Gloss paint for walls and woodwork. We also have Cincy 
and Wallwet wallpaper cleaner, Magic-Foam. Old English cleaning powder, and 
Soilax powdered cleaner. Do you need Venetian blinds? We have stock sizes or 
we can measure your windows and have them made, very reasonably. 

We cannot have everything for everyone's needs and wants, but we try to have 
the most of them, at reasonable prices, and try to give you a little extra service at 
a little or no charge. Come in and look around — we are always glad to have you 
whether you buy or not. 



for Service 



Largo or Small 
. . . See Powers 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES Or HOUSEHOLD 

ou/Mkirr «-, A I ' LI Ai\ CLS 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKy 



FOR SALE — Team aged work mules, 
work single or double, also har- 
ness. Matthew Flynn, Walton. 
Phone 743X. lt-8 



FOR RENT — Three-room fiat, in 
Glencoe. Walter Noel. Phone 
Glencoe 3041. 2t-7* 



FOR SALE— Ottawa gasoline driven 
power saw, $35. Glenn Stevens, 
Route 2, Box 314, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 419. 2t-7 



BABY CHICKS— Ohio U. S. Approved 
— Pullorum Controlled. Chicks are 
hatching every Sunday, Monday, 
and Thursday. Plenty of chicks on 
hand at all times. Open day and 
night. New Hampshires, White & 
Barred Rocks, $10.90 per 100; all 
pullets, $13.90; cockerels, $11.50. 
S. C. White Leghorns, $11.90 per 
100; pullets, $24.50; cockerels, $3. 
Buff, White & Black Minarcas, 
Buff Leghorns, Austra Whites, 
$12.90 per 100; pullets, $26.00; 
cockerels, $6.00. S. C. Reds, Buff 
Rocks? Buff Orphingtons, White 
Wyandottes,.Rock X Hamps, Hamp 
X Rocks, $11.90; pullets, $14.90; 
cockerels, $12.50. White & Black 
Giants, Light Brahmas, $13.95. 
Heavy assorted, all heavies, $9.50. 
Plenty of started chicks. One week 
old, $13.90 per 100; two weeks old, 
$17.90; three weeks old, $22.90. 
White Pekin Ducklings, $30.00 per 
100. Order your turkey poults now, 
for delivery any time after March 
15, at $89.00 per 100. Turkeys and 
Ducks hatching on Sundays only. 
We carry a fulll line of poultry sup- 
plies, feeders and founts, poultry 
remedies and. thermometers. Drive 
to this modern hatchery and see 
these exceptional bargains. Visit- 
ors welcome. Phone Jackson 9354. 
Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, Winton & 
McKelvey Roads, Mt. Healthy, O. 
lt-8 

RUSSELL'S Refrigeration and Appli- 
ance Service — Refrigerators, milk 
coolers, pumps, etc. Phone Inde- 
pendence 7430. - 4t-7* 



FOR SALE— Very good high protein 
Soybean hay, baled, $25.00 ton. 
Phone Ind. 6882. tf-6 

FOR SALE— Building lots in Walton, 
off Bedinger Ave., new subdivision. 
Sam Winkfe, Walton, Ky. 2t-7* 



FOR SALE— Holstein cow 7 years 
old, with calf. Howard Moore, 
Phone Walton 



FOR SALE — Two-row cultivator for 
Case tractor; also roan mare, a- 
bout 1400 lbs. Phone ind. 6435. 

2t-8* 



FOR'iSALE— 5-tier electric chicken 
battery, in fine shape; 4-tiex fin- 
ishing battery; 6 wire coops. H. 
C. Bacon, Walton, Route 2, first 
house North of Beacon Lite. 2t-8V 



Walton, 'Route 2. 
1367.' * 



lt-8 



FOR SALE — Four-wheel solid tire 
trailer, 10-ton capacity, $60. Glenn 
Stevens, Florence, Ky., Route 2. 
Phone 419. 2t-7 

FOR SALE— Two putrebred O. I. C. 
boars; team farm mares; will sell 
or trade for cattle. C. D. MoDan- 
nold. Phone Ind. 5022R. 2t-8* 



FOR SALE— Some walnut and red 
oak timber in the tree, also some 
large sycamore trees. Call on or 
phone, Roy D. Webster, Verona, 
Ky., Route 1; Glencoe 2673. 2t-8 

Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued on Page 5) 

FOR SALE— One saw mill, not as- 
sembled, $225. Glenn Stevens, 
Florence, Ky., Route 2. Phone 419. 

2t-7 



FOR SALE— Feed grinder, 6-in. steel 
burs, ear com or small grain; end 
gate lime or fertilizer spreader; 
wood wheel wagon with box bed. 
Walter Maddox, Nicholson. Phone 
Ind. 7486. 2t-8* 




1946 Tudor Chev. Sedan 1949 %-tOn Chev. Truck 

Very clean Low mileage 

1949 Ford Tudor Sedan 1947 Chevrolet Tudor 

Clean - Low mileage Clean - Low mileage 

1946 Chevrolet Fleetline 1941 Plymouth T-Door 
1939 Pontiac 4-Door 1937 Chevrolet Coupe 

1941 5-Pass. Chev. Coupe 1948 2-ton Chev* Truck 

Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 

Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. 5004 



Also Cooking, 
qS Water Heating 

and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, KV. 



i^fciSi 



hhobh^h 






r 



WALT 





— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper— l ' 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY - BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 1950 




Crittenden Baptist 
Church to Celebrate 
Centennial March 5th 



The Crittenden Baptist Church will 
celebrate it's centennial on March 5. 
Several .former pastors have been 
invited to take part in the day's ac- 
tivities, which will begin in the 
•morning and coir* ' ^<* t ***$mir.1 
afternoon and evenfhg. The after- 
noon service will begin at 2:30, EST. 
The church was organized March 
2, 1850, in the Presbyterian Church. 
The Moderator of the council was 
David Lillard, who pastored Ten 
Mile Church for 40 years. 

The 45 charter members were orig- 
inally rnembeMSLof . Mt. Zion and 

, W*Jn«,. & At tile' first business 

meeting, J. W. Lee was called as 
pastor. Some 35 preachers have since 
_ pastored the church. 

The, Crittenden Association was 
organized at the Crittenden Church 
on October 12, 1860. The pastor of 
the Crittenden Church, Martin 
Loomis, was elected the first moder- 
ator of the association, and the olerk 
of the Crittenden Church, Thomas 
Cunningham, was elected the first 
associational clerk. 

The present building was erected 
in 1903, during the ministry of Dr, 
Samuel Adams. Sunday 



BEN H. BERKSHIRE 

Services for Ben H. Berkshire, re- 
tired Boone county farmer and a 
member of the Board of Directors of 
the Farmers Bank, Petersburg, were 
held at 2:00 p. m., Monday at the 
Petersburg Christian Church, with 
burial in the Peters*H|g cemetery. 

Mr. Berkshire died following a 
stroke tn Warrensburgr Mo., where 
he had been passing the winter with 
a daughter, Mrs. Herbert Woodruff. 

He is also survived by another 
daughter, Mrs. Stanley Palmer of 
Korned, Mich.; two sons, Robert E. 
Berkshire of Lexington, and Norris 
Berkshire of Brevard, S. C; a sister, 
Mrs. Lou Crisler of NewT'ork; a bro- 
ther, Gene Berkshire ^Stetersburg; 
nine grandchildren and six great- 
-grandchildren. „,r 

The Chambers 



Volume 35 — Number 9 



34th District Basketball Tournament Schedule 



rooms and other improvements were 
added in 1947. 

Three preachers have been ordain- 
ed by the church : J. M. Shelborn, in 
1896; Harold Sever, in 1932, and 
Wendell Belew, in 1947. 

The church, for several years, re- j 
ceived $100 per year from the State! 
Mission Board. In 1948, the total 
contributions of the church amount- i 
ed to nearly $10,000. | 

A complete history of the church 
has (been written by the pastor. Ray- i 
mond Lawrence, and can be had by ' 
sending $1.00 to Fred Turpin, Crit- 
tenden, Ky. 



The Chambers ft G* j S funeral 

home, Walton, A^NS&SgeX 
rangements, &* 



ALLEN BUYS BUSINESS 

James R. Allen, an associate with 
the firm Walton & Readnour for sev- 
eral years, has purchased this bus- 
iness and will operate in the future 
as Allen's Coal and Peed. 

Mr. Allen is well known in and 
arouna Walton, at present being 
Chief of the Walton Volunteer Fare 
Department, a job he is doing effick 
ently. Hehas been a member of the 
faculty of Dixie Heights 'High Schoo] 
for a number m~ years, however, he 
school" I s ,givin '£ U P thi s position in order to 



1— St. Henry 

Wed., Mar. 1 - 8:00 
At Simon Kenton " 
2— Walton-Verona _ 

3 — Hebron 

Thur.,.Mar. 2 - 8:00 
At S*W5n Kenton - 
4— Simon Kenton __ 

5— Burlington 

Wed., Mar. 1 - 8:00 

At St. Henry 
6 — Florence 

7— Lloyd 

Thur., Mar. 2 - 8:00 

At St. Henry 
8— New Haven __?_ 



Fri., Mar. 3 • 8:00 
At Simon Kenton 



>*... 



JS*? 



Sat, Mar. 4-8:00 
At Simon Kenton 



R. A. Johnson New 
Red Cross Chairman 



Fri., Mai 
Art St 




\ 



Succeeds the Late 
Everett Newman 



St 



- -Nl M 



Jl&r 



devote full time to the coal and feed 
business. 

Mr. Allen states he will continue 
to handle a full line of fence, ferti- 
lizer, feed, seed, and coal. Your 
patronage will be appreciated.. See 
ad in this issue. 



National 4-H Club 
Week Observance 
Set For Mar. 4-12 



GoalOf^fB Set- 
By Walton Baptist 
Church School 



• '^ttf^ Living for a Better World," ! Thd Bible School of the Walton 
is the heme for National 441 Club Baptist Church will try for 310 In* 
Week, this year. The dates for this attendance, Sunday. The highest 
event have been set for March 4 to ever attained was 301 some 355 
dunng that week, Kenton! ago. All members of the church 



12 and 



W. W. (Dub) SCOTT 



Fourteen Tax Hearing 
Conferees Named 
By Commissioner 



County 4-H members and 4-H boys; and those .who do not : mv- 

and girls all oyer the country, will! where are*e*>ecial"y urge t -be 

be "getting set," with that theme in present Sun£\ 

mind for another successful" year of rkJ.r.uiT,.*Ui"" i 

4-H Club work. The theme is noti ' ™rch«ls planning aome Jm . 

just a high-sounding phrase £ the ' ^XTf^ * the " ear future ' and 
Kenton County 4-H vounesters Wm? P a have an organ installed. 

s iTfoe new Bulletin Board, just recent- 
ly installed in front of the church, 
was furnished by the B. T. U. 

A hearty invitation is extended 
to all to attend services art: this 
church. If you are not attending 
church and Sunday school some- 



Commissioner of Revenue H. Clyde 
Reeves has announced the appoint - 



Funeral services were held at 1:00 ment o ' murtZ , t. * e &PI 

W (Dub) Srotir 7« f^™«r\i unty boards of tax supervisors On 

w. kuud) aconc, 7b, farmer of near, property assessment* 
Verona, who died early last Wednes- 1 The hearing 



day, after a Jong illness, at the home 
of a daughter, Mrs. Laura Allphin, 
Verona. 

Mr. Scott was born in Owen coun- 
ty, but resided most of his life in 
Gallatin county. He once ran for 
the jailer's office in Gallatin coun- 
ty. He was a member of the South 
Fork Christian Church. Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott had recently celebrated 
their Golden wedding anniversary. 

He leaves has~wife, Mrs. Belle 
Webster Scott; three brothers, Har- 
rison Scott of Owenton, oseph Scott 
of Rising Sun, Ind., and Lee Scott of 
Williamstown; two sisters, Emma 
Browning, Fallas, and Hattie Scott 
of Aurora, Ind.; three daughters, 
Mrs. Rena Ernst of Cincinnati, Mrs. 
Laura Allphin of Verona, and Mrs. 
Grace Allen of Erlanger; seven sons, 
Roy Scott of Cincinnati, Ross Scott 
of Beaver Lick, John Scott of Beaver, 
Pa., Raymond and Wilson Scott of 
Verona, Wesley Scott of Florence, 
and Herbert Scott of Halton, Ind.; 
34 grandchildren, 10 great-grand- 
children, and numerous nieces and 
nephews. 

Burial was in the I. O. O. F. Cem- 
etery at Napoleon, under the direc- 
tion of the Hamilton funeral home, 
Verona. 

FRUIT MEET-MAROT3 

W. W. Magill, horticulturist from 
the University of Kentucky, will 
meet with fruit growers of Boone 
county, Friday, March 3, at 9:30 a. 
m. at the William Moore farm on^ 
Conners' Lane, near Hebron, accord-" 
ing to Bill Davis, County Agent. 

Mr. Magill will discuss with the 
growers, new developments in insect 
and disease control and culture of 
fruits. The annual fruit program 
will also foe discussed at .the meet- 
ing. All growers aire urged to art 
tend. 



commissioner for 
Boone, Kenton, Grant, Gallatin apd 
Owen Counties, is James Ford of 
Owenton, Ky. 

These hearing conferees were 
authorized under an act of special 
legislative session of 1949. It's pur- 
pose is to give the taxpayer an op- 
portunity to make his appe% and to 
be heard in his own eoun.y. This 
saves him the expense and incon- 
venience of a trip to Frankfort, 
which was required for appeals un- 
der the old law. * 

Any taxpayer who is dissatisfied 
with the assessment on his property 
after action of the county board of 
supervisors, may appeal to the State 
Tax Commission. This appeal must 
be made in writing and may be done 
by letter addressed to the Kentucky 
Tax Commission in Frankfort. The 
appeal must be accompanied by a 
certified copy of the assessment 
made by the county board. Such 
oases will be referred to the approp- 
riate hearing conferee who will take 
The evidence and report it to the 
Kentucky Tax Commission 4& ac- 
tion. 



a real" practical mottor for work and 
effort in their clubs, communities 
and in their daily lives. 

Kenton County 4-H members in 
observing this special week, will 
have a window display an the Union 
Light, Heat and Power Co. building 
in Covington, Four-H posters will 
be displayed, radio programs will be 
given and special programs will be 
conducted in their clubs and cbm- 
munities. j 

The 4-H Club program provides 
opportunity for activity, adventure 
and achievement. Each 4-H mem- 
ber does one or more phases of pro- 
ject work, under supervision of the 
County Extension Agents and local 
volunteer leaders, that will demon- 



where else, you are urged, by the 
pastor, Rev. b. c. Garrett, to attend 
the Baptist Church. 



THOMAS W. MARSHALL 

Thomas W. Marshall, well known 
Northern and Central Kentucky to- 
bacco man, died early Sunday at his 
home on Lloyd Ave., Florence. He 

was 73 years old. "Upon the death of Everett New- 

Mr. Marshall, a former resident of man, who was Chairman of the Red 
Walton, had been sales manager for ! Cross Drive, I was asked to accept 
the Harrison County Tobacco Ware- ^chairmanship for the completing of 
house, Cynthiana, Ky., for the past a J ob - well begun. I accepted this 
12 years. He had also been a buyer work — first, because I believe in Red 
on many Kentucky ■^w**pv --- ,. j»i Cross, and second, because t&..i..,jzt 

He is survived M' !•**■■ •- ^ K **^Q^Vte>te a job begun by a good 

Stella Ashcraft Marshall; a daugrl- -- «nd of mine, who looked forward 
ter. Mrs. Ellen N. Rosebrook, Cin- ! to a £ rea:t victory in the drive this 
oinnati, Ohio; four sisters, Mrs. O. vear - 

C. Jones and Mrs. Frank Norman, j -"I am urging every worker to put 
both of Walton, Mrs. Clara Kuester! their best into the drive this year 
of Cleveland, Ohio and Mrs. Arthur ! and also asking the public to answer 
Adams of Cincinnati, and a brother, their visit with a worthy contribu- 
Wilham Marshall of Cincinnati. tion. The Red Cross has and is do- 

Funeral services were held at 2:00 ing a great work in rendering service 
p. m., Tuesday, Feb. 28 at the Rich- to those in need. It is an agency of 
wood Presbyterian Church, with bur- ! mercy to all that ask for help • 

^helLmbers TfiZEL t , ! •" I wish itwere P°^»Je *» *» io 

*J£Z ~ nambers & Gmbbs funeral visit every one of you In person but 
home Florence, completed arrange- we know that is impossibfe ^o'irt is 

in this way that I am asking Boone • 
County, one of the greatest in the 
State of Kentucky, to get in back of 
the drive as never before and make 
this year one of our best, for this 
worthy cause. Again I ask that you 
do your best."— R. A. Johnson. 



Lockmaster at 
Dam 38 Dies of 
A Heart Attack 



Independence Homemak 



ers 



The Independence Homemakers 
met with Mrs. William House for the 
February meeting, with roll call be- 
ing answered by "my most distaste- 
ful task." All enjoyed having Miss 
Zelma E. fiyerly, Kenton County 
- , Jiome Demonstration Agent, present, 
strate or teach better ways of hqme- She gave a very interesting talk on 
£SSL a lf a *™ulu f e. Four-H the Farm and Home eonvel ion °n 
boys, and girls are practicing demo- Lexington, which she attended 
crat.c procedures and developing in I Garden leader Mr* House read 
then -4-H clubs a deeper appreciation an article on the bet flowers Tnd 
ohfe in the country and the derno- garden seeds for thtemS 



Any taxpayer who wishes to ap- 
peal the action of the Kentucky "Tax 
Commission may then take his case 
to the circuit court in his own coun- 
ty. 



BROTHERHOOD DINNER 

Rev. Forest King of Lexington, is 
to foe guest speaker at the Walton 
Christian Church, Sunday morning. 
Immediately following the morning 
service, a covered-dish dinner will 
be served in the church basement 
by the ladles. All members are urg- 
ed to foe present. 



cratic way of life. 

There is opportunity now forTttf \y 
fooys and girls in Kenton Couki^ 
who wish to join the 4-H club, whSSe 
creed and principals are expressed 
in their club pledge. 

"I pledge — 
My ihead to dearer thinking 
My heart to greater loyalty 
My hands to larger service 
And my health to better living 
For my club, my community and my 

country." 



OYSTER SUPPER MAR. 1 J 

An oyster supper will be given ai 
the Independence Christian Church 
on Saturday evening, March llfff 
from 5:00 to 9:00. This supper is be- 
ing given for benefit of the building 
fund. Tickets are 50 cents. All are 
cordially invited. 



Garden-Cultural Club Meets 

The February meeting of the Ken- 
ton County Gamten arid Cultural 
Club was held in the home of Mrs. 
Orie S. Ware, with Mrs. William R. 
Brown presiding: " 

Mrs. J. A. Keeney, Chairman of 
the Cultural Committee, introduced 
the guest speaker, Mrs. George Bar- 
bour of Cincinnati, who gave a most 
colorful descrliption of life as site 
found it when making a home for 
her family in six different countries. 

Mrs. Claude Taylor and Mrs. E. F. 
Vallandingham were welcome guests 



Gunpowder Homemakers 

The Gunpowder Homemakers will 
meet at the home of Mrs. Glenn 
Stevens, Tuesday, March 7th at 10:30 
for the regular meeting. 

The major project, "Nutrition In 
Meal Planning," will be presented 
by Mrs. Robert Moore and Mrs. M. 
B. Shelton, leaders. \AH members 
are urged to foe present, and visitors 
are always welcome.— Pub. Ohm. 

MASONIC MEETING 

According to Eugene Sizemore, the 
Worthy Master, a call meeting of 
Walton Lodge, 719, F. & A. M. will 
be held Friday, March 10th at 7:30 
p. m. There will foe work in the 
Fellowcraft degree, and all Master 
Masons are invited. 



LOAN ASSN. MEETING 

The Williamstown National Farm 
Loan Association held it's annual 
stockholders' meeting at Williams- 
town, last week. The meeting was 
well attended, with members and 
visitors from Campbell, Kenton, Pen- 
dleton and Grant counties present. 

Chris H. Beck of Kenfton county, 
and A. J. McNees of Pendileton coun- 
ty, were re-elected to .the board of 
directors for a three-year term. 

All members present were present- 
ed dividend checks, representing a 
5% dividend on their stock owned 
in the association. 

M. J. Belew, educator and farmer, 
of Crittenden, gave an excellent talk 
on "Giants in the Land." 

After Mr. Belew's talk, the meet- 
ing adjourned to .the Hotel Donald, 
where a delightful lunch was served. 

At'the Board of Directors meeting, 
held immediately after luneh, H. W. 
Bertram of Campbell county was re- 
elected president, and W. O. Black- 
burn of Grant county was re-elected 
vice president. 

CHRISTIAN W.M.S. . 

The W. M. S. of the Walton Christ- 
ian Church will meet in the home of 
Mrs. Gilbert Groger, High School 
Court, Thursday. This will foe an 
all -day meeting, with a covered - 
dish dinner. 



on '] 
try. ' 
Davij 
one L 
for <b\ 
nolds 



The 
citizenship chairman, Mrs. Logan 
Wayman, presented a questionaire 
Riming a citizen of this coun- 
3ading chairman, Mrs. Chas. 
.*ave a talk and asked.-eaeh 
/read a chapter in the Bible 
j next month. Mrs. J. C. Rey- 
ga<ve the "thought for the 
month — America for me," and al- 
so I lesson on "clothing guide post 
and style trends for spring, 1950." 

Attending were Miss Byerly, Mrs. 
Foster Armstrong, Mrs. G. H. Hous- 
ton, Mrs. C. W. Carter, Mrs. W. H v 
Sumraey, Mrs. Logan Way man, Mrs 
Charles Davis, Mrs. William House, 
' T. Pecgrem, Mrs. F. H. Shank- 



Mrs. 



lin, Mrs. J. C. Reynolds, Mrs. C. S. 
Snelson, Mrs. J. T. Stone, Mrs. ieo 
Flynn and Kathleen Plynn. 



TRAINING CLASS 



The Foods Training Class, which 
was given by Mrs. Pearl J. Haak, a 
Foods Specialist from the University 
of Kentucky, and held" at the Com- 
munity Hall, Florence, was well at- 
tended by leaders from the fifteen 
Homemakers Clubs. 

Those present were, Messers. P. 
Stephens, K. Cropper, J. Northcutt, 
M. Meece, C. Patrick, C. Hill, E. Cat- 
ton, V. Dolwick, R. Cox, H. Wessler, 
R. J. Myers, C. Moore, M. E. Shelton, 
S. Rodger, P. Birch, R. Schwanberg, 
M. Hickman, R. McGuire, J. Miller, 
G. Fischer, E. Owens, V. Pope, J. Ay- 
lor, E. Smith, A. M. Burch, and A. 
Stone. 

The next training class will 
held on (March 16.— Pub. Ohm. 



Everett E. Newman, 49, one of the 
best-known lockmasters on the Ohio 
River, died last Wednesday night in 
St. Elizabeth Hospital, after being 
stricken with a heart attack while 
attending a Red Cross rally in Flor- 
ence. 

Lockmaster for 17 years at Dam 
38, near Belleview, he was chairman 
of the Red Cross fund-raising drive 
for 1950. He was master of cere- 
monies at the rally in Florence High 
school, but shortly after the meeting 
started, complained of pains and 
consulted a doctor. Death occurred 
at 11 p. m., after being taken to the 
hospital. . ^ 

Mr. Newman was well known for 
his work in converting the Dam 38 
reservation into a picnic area. He 
had been employed toy the U. S. 
Engineers for 30 years. 

Born in West Virginia, Newman 
was vice president of the American 
Federation of Government Employes 
Lodge 354, at Fernbank. 
, Besides his widow, Mrs. Ethel 
Newman, and three small children, 
Sharon, Robert and Daniel, who live 
in quarters on the dam reservation, 
he also leaves a son and daughter 
by a prevjous marriage, Charles 
Newman of Covington, and Mrs. 
Florence Horton of Sayler Park, O. 

Funeral services were held Sun- 
day at Bellevjew, with the Chambers 
& Grubbs funeral home, Florence, in 
charge. 



be 



INTERMEDIATE G. A.s 

The Intermediate G. A.'s of the 
Walton Baptist Church met Monday 
evening with Mrs. Charles Praither. 
"Forward Steps," were studied and 
the "Week of Prayer" program was 
observed, several members taking 
part. 

Those present were Bonnie Beach, 
Jeanette Chapman, Janice Cook, 
Alva Flynn, Faye Flynn, Kay Green, 
Rita Stephenson, Shirley Strause, 
Mabel Vest, Mary Kay Wilson', Nina 
Moorehead, Yvonne Flynn, Betty 
Johhson, Rose Marie Vest, June 
Howard, Margie Wagner and coun- 
selors, Mrs. Violet Praither and Mrs. 
Dora Pennington. 



"As publicity chairman of Boone 
County Red Cross it was my job to 
make public through the medium of 
the newspapers the appointment of 
Everett Newman as Fund Chairman 
of the 1950 Drive. It is now my task 
to (try, in words, to expresa the great 
sense of loss and shtoek well all ex- 
perienced when we learned of Mr. 
Newman's untimely death. 

"About fifty of us enjoyed dinner 
with Mr. Newman and heard him 
nominated and elected to the Board 
of Directors of this organization. We 
then assembled ' for a program he 
and R. A. Johnson had prepared for 
our enjoyment. During this program 
Mt. Newman became ill and quietly 
left to see a physician. Our mem- 
ories of Mr. Newman are of the best. 
We enjoyed a good fellowship with 
him, working in a worthy cause. 

"Our heartfelt sympathy is ex- 
tended Mrs. Newman and family. 
May you know we shall strive to live 
up to the example he set before us. 
R. A. Johnson, long-time friend of 
Mr. Newman,' knowing of the sincere 
effort he had made to have a suc- 
cessful drive, volunteered to take 
over this unfinished work. This is a 
fine tribute to Mr. Newman and we 
are grateful for such a man. 
■ 'May we all join Mr. Johnson in 
a special effort to complete this 
work and give him the support he 
deserves."— (Pub. Chm. 



CATS END REGULAR 
SEASON WITH 84-25 WIN 



Walton Homemakers No. 2 

Walton Homemakers, II, was en- 
tertained February 15th toy Mist 
James Riddell. The meeting was 
called to order toy the president, Mrs. 
W. M. Jones. The second lesson on 
"Hating Making," was given by Mrs. 
Matthew Flynn, assisted by Miss 
McClaskey and Mrs. &eo Flynn. 

Eight members were present, Mrs. 
Wm. Jones, Miss McClaskey, Mrs. 
Matthew Flynn, Mrs. Leo Flynn 
Mrs. Agnes Sleet, Mrs. Matthew 
Sleet, Miss Martha Johnsoh, Mrs 
Alice Sleet, Mrs. James Riddell, 
Mrs. Virgie Seohrest, Miss Addie 
Sleet, Miss Alice Poor.— Pub. Chm 



SALE POSTPONED 

The Joe Pinnell sale scheduled for 
last Saturday, was postponed due 
to the bad weather. The sale has 
been rescheduled for Saturday, 
March 4, 'beginning at 1:00 p. m. It 
is to be held 1 mile North of Morn- 
ing View, Ky. Harry Johnson is con- 
duction the auction. 



PLAN 4-H CLUB CAMP 

Camp Ernst will be taken over by 
4-H'ers from June 26 to 30, 1950. 

County and Home Agents met in 
Coyingtton, February 24 to set up 
plans for the camp program this 
summer. CountiesZ represented in 
this meeting were Boone, Campbell, 
Grant, Kenton, Owen and Pendleton. 



The Walton-Verona Bearcats end- 
ed their regular season basketball 
schedule last Friday night on the 
local floor by walloping the winless 
New Haven Tigers, 84-25. The Cats 
completed a most successful season 
having won 21 games, while losing 
only three. 

In the New Haven game, Coach 
Hayes started the five seniors — 
Johnson, Vest, Maddox, Cheeseman, 
and Cleek, and at the end of the first 
quarter had run up a 37-6 lead over 
the Tigens, The junior team went 
into action then — Rice, Meadows, 
Hall, Ryan and Glacken. The teams 
played on pretty even terms for a- 
bout two quarters, with the winners 
holding the edge. In the final per- 
iod, the seniors went back into ac- 
tion and scored almost at will. Vest 
Maddox and Cheesemen led the at- 
tack for the Blue and White. 



Cornfoorers were found in Livings- 
ton county for the first time in 1949. 



DISTRICT 4-H MEETING 

Thjrty-four 4-H leaders from Ken- 
ton, Campbell, Boone, Grant and 
Gallatin counties attended a Work- 
shop in Covington, February 28. at 
the YMCA. 

leaders from Kenton county were 
Mrs. William R. Brown, Mrs. C. C. 
Gross, (Miss Emily Obermeier, Miss 
Virginia Sohoborg, Mrs. Carl Els- 
bernd, Mrs. Florence Wilson and 
Mrs. William Bach. 

Home agents attending were Miss 
Zelma E. Byerly, Kenton county; 
Miss Jewell Wilson, Gallatin coun- 
ty; Mrs. Mary Frances Walden, 
Grant county; Miss Nancy McClasky 
Boone county, and Miss Eugenia 
Donahue, Campbell county 



Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, March 2, 1950 



WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established in 1914) 



Entered as Second Class Matter 

January 1, 1916 at the Post 

Office at Walton, Ky. 

Mark M. Meadows 
Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

$1.50 PER YEAR 
(In Advance) 




MEMBER 



KENTUCKY PRES! 
AS SOCIATION , 

OtCAHIJlD liKlHltr. lilt 



Sheriff's Sale 

By virtue of Judgment and Order 
of Sale directed to me, which issued 
from the Office of the Judge of the 
Boone Quarterly, Court, in favor of 
Colonial Finance Co., in the case of 
Colonial Finance Co., a corporation, 
Plaintiff, against Lawrence Vest and 
Emma Vest, Defendants, I, or one of 
my Deputies, will on Friday, 'the 17th 
day of March, 1950,. between the 
hours 1 ** 1:00 o'clock P. M., and 2:00 
o'clock P. M., at Home of Lawrence 
Vest, Walton, Boone County, Ken- 
tucky, expose to public sale, to the 
highest bidder, the following de- 
scribed property, to-wit: 

1 cream Kitchen Cabinet; 4 Maple 
Kitchen Chairs; 1 Frigidaire; 1 Boss 
Kerosene Range; 1 Round Maple 
Table; 3 (Metal Beds; 1 Baby Walnut 
Bed; 1 Walnut Rocker; 1 Walnut 
Dresser; 1 painted blue Dresser; 1 
straight back Walnut Chair; 1 wine 
Davenport; 1 Bridge Lamp; 2 End 
Tables, Walnut; 2 Walnut Rockers; 
1 9'xl2' Rug; 1 Estate Heatrola; 1 
Davenette, black leather; 1 Philco 
Radio. 



The amount of the Judgment is 
$119.98, plus interest and costs. 

Terms: Cash Sale. 

This 27th day of February, 1950. 

W. H. EASTON, 

3t-9 Sheriff Boone County, Ky. 



LITTLE SOUTH FORK 







Rea Scudder and Mr. amd Mrs. 
Harry Baker and daughters were in 
Covington shopping, Wednesday. 

Mrs. Eliza Scudder has returned 
home after visiting her son, Mr. and 
Mrs. Rea Scudder. 

Mrs. John Perry has returned to 
the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Catherine Sutton, after visiting her 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Perry of 
Glencoe. 

Miss Sally Jane Baker spent Fri- 
day night and aturday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Julius Sutton and daughter, 
Shirley. 

Miss Bonnie Baker spent Sunday 
with her cousin, Shirley Sutton. 



. 



Clark county sheepmen are losing 
an estimated $8,000 annually from 
sheep killed by dogs. =t - 



L. J. METZGER 



OPTOMETRIST 

and 

OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 0535 

Office Hours . . . 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



FARMS FOR SALE 

114 ACRES — Located on State Highway; 7 rooms and bath, strictly 
modern; large combination barn; also nice orchard; base 1.6; 
spring-fed lake well stocked. This farm is well kept; good fence; 
ideally located, on bus route. Price $22,000. 

41 ACRES — Located on U. S. Highway; location the best; 6-room 
modern home with cell arium; lot of outbuildings. Which are ex- 
tra good; some of, the finest bluegrass land in Boone county; 
base 9/10; good bus service — takes only 20 minutes to go to town. 
^ Price $25,000. 

. "V "**~&****~&ted on U. S. Highway, uj»c .„ ^vimTIJ-room house; 
dairy barh*with 20 stanchions; fixed*, for shipping grade J* A" 
milk; has a lot of road frontage. " Price $21,000. 

200 ACRES — Approximately 9 miles from Walton; 6-room house, 
, feed barn, large tobacco barn racked off, plenty of outbuildings, 
lot of hay; base 4.7; well watered, good fence; •farm rented this 
year to reliable tenant; wonderful investment — $18,000. 

104 ACRES — Five-room house, 2" barns and outbuildings; base 2.1; 
located 8 miles from Florence — $12,500. 

78 ACRES — Kenton county; 4-room house, needs some repair; one 
barn. Price $7,500. 

FLORENCE — One of the best locations; 5 rooms and bath; extra 
lot; city water and gas; furnished; also 5 outbuildings. Every- 
thing goes for $8,500, or will sell without furniture. 

ALSO have some good houses in Walcon. 

IF you are looking for a business — have some stores that are un- 
usual buys— all prices. 

R. P. COLEMAN 

Real Estate and Auction Sales 
FLORENCE, KY. HIGHWAY 42 FLORENCE 148 




We have a car of American Wire Fence . . . priced to 

v 

sell immediately ... we must get rid of this fence . . . 
come in and see us! 



FERTILIZER 

The best Agrico ... for Tobacco and Corn . . . 



for Immediate Delivery! 



_ . Also Full Line of 
Ubiko Feed - Seed 
Straw and Hay 

Allen's Coal & Feed 

(FORMERLY WALTON & READNOUS) 

Phone 154 - Walton, Ky. 



Mr. and Mrs. Russell Vest, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Vest and children were 
Sunday night guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Rayrnond Baker and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Sutton and 
Shirley, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Baker 
and Sally and Bonnie were the six 
o'clock dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Baker and sons of Cov- 
ington, Friday evening. 

M? . and Mrs. Robert Baker and 
sons were after-church guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Baker and daughter 
Shirley. 

Rev. Joe Johnson and Rev. Ward 
were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Baker and family. 

William O. Gilreath of McCreary 
county is planning the construction 
of earth dams to impound water for 
irrigation of pasture land. 



STURGEON 

Electrical Service 

—Wiring of All Kinds— 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 
— Phone 71 or 1396 — 



For the Best In H«ating 



-phone 



J arman Heating Service 

WALTON ... 524 

Engineered Heating — Coal, Oil, 
Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 



Heating & Plumbing Supplies 






DR. PAUL J. 

TABEUNG 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



EXTERIOR & INTERIOR 

PAINTING 

Paper Hanging 

Also Steaming Off Wallpaper 

LUKE BROS. 

Phone: JUniper 4084 
or Independence 6329 



i DIAMOND 
I VALUE . . . 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and 
admiration. 

Come to Motch's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced in strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
ence in this one loca- 
tion is your assurance 
of getting dollar for 
dollar value. In your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 
Monthly Payments I 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 




MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

NEW SHIPMENTS! 

TOBACCO CANVAS, 32x28, 9 ft. wide, 100 ft. 
long, metal eyelets— NOW $975 

TOBACCO CANVAS, 32x28, 12 ft. wide, 100 ft. 
long, metal eyelets— NOW $12.75 

New Shipment of "Movie Star" Slips, lace or tailorecP- 
regular value 2.98— this week ONLY „.. $1.98 

New Shipment of Ladies' Cotton Dresses, "Joan Curtis 
Fashion," reg. 3.98 value— this week ONLY $2.98 

New Shipment Men's Slip-Over Sweaters, "Campus," 
100% virgin wool, reg. 4.98— this week ONLY $3.98 

New Shipment Ladies' Blouses, "Lernercraf t," reg. 3.98 
value— this week ONLY $2.98 

— Other New Shipments Arriving Daily— 

You get more quality lor your money when 
you buy "STAR BRAND," "POLL PARROTT" 
and "ENDICOTT JOHNSON" shoes. We sell 
better shoes at lower prices. Compare the 
quality and price of our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. P. F. Gym Shoes. 

—WE FIT BY X-RAY— 

Morris Dept. Store 

"TA» Muse of Quality" — Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLA^-"^ x^tKENTUCKY 




TELEVISION 

* 

* — General Electric, Emerson and Crosley — 

G. E. and Philco Refrigerators ; G. E. and Easy Washers ; 
G. E. and Philco Home Freezers; we also have our ser- 
vice department for televisions and refrigerators. 

Easy Terms! Liberal Trade-In Allowance! 

R. W. Gross Appliances 



Phone Ind. 5111 



Independence, Ky. 




' m**~*~^~" 



mfr 



^opacity- 



I I. 



Now— a genuine Maytag at these easy-on-the-budget prices! 
Join the millions of women who now get real washday satis- 
faction with the rugged, dependable Maytag! 

Easy terms. Liberal trade-in. Come in today for a dem- 
onstration. 







r^L- — ^iB 


^** Jsji 


^Z— Hi 


»* 


®fl 


5JU 


Ifil 





THE MAYTAO CHIEFTAIN. A gen- 
nine Maytag, yet priced within a 
few dollar* of the loweat- »«..«., 
eoat waahera on the *|24— 
maraM , 



THE MAYTAO COMMANDER 
Big, square porcelain tub. Gyra- 
foam aeUon waahea M _ _ 
extra faat. extra, *|44_ 



H AGEDORN'S 

856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Phone Dixie 7113 



rfc* 



Maytag! $205 

For Your Old Washer, Regardless of Make or Condition 
No Down Payment — 1 Year to Pay 

Of course you mi 
afford a /naytfiq/ 



I 





Thursday, March 2, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 




"WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship n : oo a. m 

b. t u : — 6:30 p. m 

Evening Worship 7;3o p> m Prayer Service Wed.. 7:30 p m 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 

J. E. Perry, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 



WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Prank Penlck, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship i_ : oo a. m 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 

Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship n : oo a. m 

Youth Fellowship 6:45 p m 

Evening Worship 7.-30 p.' m ' 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 

ST. PATRICK CHURCH, VERONA 
g Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 

1st Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month — 10:00 a. m. 
5th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

- ALL SAINTS MISSION. WALTON 

Rev. Her.., „. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
2nd Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a. m. 
3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
4th Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a. m. 
5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 




By DR. KENNETH J. FOREMAN 



SCRIPTURE: Acts 19:1—20:16: Eph- 
esians 4:17-32. 

DEVOTIONAL READING: Isaiah 65: 
6:13. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship '__ 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(First and Third Sundays) 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Young People __ 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. ___ 7:30 p. m. 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship _, 11:00 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship _•_ 7:30 p. m. 



SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CnoHCli 

Don Smith, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 



Base of Operations 

Lesson for March 5, 1950 



■*m$8 



•THERE IS NO RULE in the Bible 
* forbidding Christians to have 
common sense. You are not sup- 
posed to lay aside your mind when 
you become a Christian. 

This has had many illustrations: 
let us take Ephesus for one. Put 
yourself, in imagination, back to 
the first Christian 
century. Ask your- 
self: Where can 
we start a church 
where it will do 
the most good? 
Where can we put 
a church that will 
spread out, one 
that is sure to 
h_Ve daughter- " _. 
churches? W here Dr - Forem a»" 
can we reach people of in- 
fluence? Where can we locate a 
church where it is certain to- be 
heard of? 

As your eye ranged over a map 
of the Empire, .'you would have 
lighted on Ephesus" as the very 
place. It was a true capital, not a 
merely political . one. 




KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School , 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 

— Services Every Sunday— 



INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 
Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed _ 8:00 p. m. 

NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

S. Webster, Pastor 

Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School _"_ 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship * 11:00 a. at. 

B. T. U 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed. 8:00 p. m. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:30 a. m. 



LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona -Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 



BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 



CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Walter Kidwell, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Services 11:00 a. m 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor— Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt.— HaTvey Hughes 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

Evening Worship !_ 8:00 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 *__-Ray 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



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501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINGTON, KY. 



Strategy 

TT was a master-strqke, selecting 
* Ephesus as' a base of operations. 
It made possible the rapid spread 
of the Christian faith into the prov- 
ince of Asia. The decision to plant 
a church there had been matched 
by other strategic decisions in 
Christian history since then. One 
of these was founding the church 
in Rome. That was an even greater 
city and capital than Ephesus, and 
it has lasted much longer. 

If the Christian church had 
been content to be provincial, 
all right for the smaller towns 
but afraid to tackle the big 
ones, if the early church had 
feared to seat itself in Rome, 
the whole history of Europe 
would have been different. 
When the Roman Empire crumb- 
led, as in time it did, the church 
rose on its ruins and took its place 
as the great civilizer of Europe, 
the strong force that kept a con- 
tinent from decay for nearly a 
thousand years. 

• • • 

Our Ancestors 

pROM THE DAYS of the early 
^ Roman church there comes a 
well-known story which may be 
true. In the slave market at Rome 
the Pope saw some handsome 
small boys, whiter than. the aver- 
age Roman, for sale. Who are you? 
he asked. "Angli," they said— Ang- 
les, from far-off marshes along 
the North Sea. No, smiled the 
Pope, who was a bit of a punster, 
you are too good looking for that; 
"Non Angli sed Angeli," not Angles 
but Angels. 

Anyway, the church did send 
some missionaries to far-away 
Anglia and elsewhere in Northern 
Europe. It turned out to be another 
strategic base, of operations. Even- 
tually France and Germany and 
England and the other countries in 
that part of the world were con- 
verted to Christianity. The time 
came when those very nations took 
the lead in moving into the rest of 
the world, into the western hemis- 
phere, "down under" to Aus- 
tralia, even into Africa. Where 
they went, they carried their relig- 
ion with them. 

Suppose the church had not 
thought our ancestors worth 
converting? Suppose all the 
colonizing movements of the 
16th and following centuries 
had been waves of sheer pa- 
gans? ' 

It is not mere racial pride to say 
that the sending of missionaries to 
those savage peoples of northern 
Europe was one of the most stra- 
tegic moves ever made by the 
Christian church. 

* • • 

And Today? 

THE CHURCH has not always 
* been smart. Sometimes we 
have missed tlje boat. There have 
been strategic centers we might 
have occupied — and did, not. 

There was a time, for instarice, 
when Russia, that mighty nation, 
was open to Christian teaching. 
Many who knew that country gjwere 
saying about 1918 that it was 'pos- 
sible to capture that land for 
Christ. But the Christian church 
was little interested . . . and now 
whatever Christianity is there has 
to stay underground. 

Farther east, our own Gen- 
eral MacArthur has been call- 
ing for missionaries to Japan, 
thousands of them. Japan is 
wide open to Gospel today as 
never before. But where are 
the missionaries? Going over 
in driblets. 

Whenever Christianity has seen 
a strategic point and taken it, fu- 
ture generations have been blessed; 
whenever we miss our chance, fu- 
ture generations will wonder how 
we could have been so blind. 



NEW BETHEL BAPTIST. VERONA 

Rev. R. f. DeMoisey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School 10.00 a. m. 

Morning Worship n : oo a . m 

Evening Worship _____ 7:30 p m " 
Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

-^Services Every Sunday— 

WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Grover F. Tyner, Jr., Pastor 

Fred McMillian, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship i_ : oo a . m 

B. T. U 6:45 p m " 

Evening Worship 7:30 p m 

Mid-Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. ml 

INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School _0:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U __ 7:00 p. m. 

Worship 7;3o p . m . 

Prayer Bible. Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 

STAFFORDSBUHG CHURCH 
Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m. 

UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 
Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 a. m. 

Worship Service 10:30 a. m. 



Page Three 



< .-.„__.„__,, 

Prices 
all can 
afford ! 



THE REST PLACE 
to 

EH.! 
IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 



the Facilities, 
the Experience, 
and the Ability 
to give the 
Finest in funeral 
service I 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

FUNERAL HOMES 

Walton, Ky. Florence, Ky. 

Phone 352 Phone 193 




For A Rainy Day! 



Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as little as $1.00! 



Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KY. 




DP T ^LTET£E.TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday, 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 





.. „.-„ - _. -^ „, , lfm ^ 




■■■■■■■*■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 



i'^ lr, 9 4 Smoke 



^ 




Smokestacks are essential in an 

industrial age. Without them we 

would be choked and blinded by 

the fumes of our own factories. 

Our giant stacks lift the smoke where the 

breeze can blow it away. 

Have you sometimes wished that some- 
one would provide a kind of smokestack 
to lift the cloud that stifles our hopes and 
happiness? 

Someone did! 

His name was Jesus. And His gift to humanity 
was something which, in its original csude form, 
was no more beautiful than a smokestack. It 
was a Cross ! 

He died on that Cross. But by His Sacrifice 
He made it the instrument of man's freedom 
from the cloud that man himself had made. 

Our Churches worship Him, and teach the 
meaning of His Cross . . . lifting the smoke of 
sin from our lives. 



THE CHURCH FOH ALL . . . 

ALL FOR THE CHURCH 

The Church Is the greatest fac- 
tor on earth for the building of 
character and good citizenship. It 
is a storehouse of spiritual values. 
Without a strong Church, neither 
democracy nor civilization can 
survive. There are four sound 
reasons why every person should 
attend services regularly and sup- 
Port the Church. They are- (1) 
For his own sake. (2) For his 
children s sake. (3) For the sake 
ot his community and nation. (4) 
For the sake of the Church itself, 
which needs his moral and ma- 
terial support. Plan to go to 

Bib.fdany 0uIarly md nad »"* 

Book Chspter Verses 
Sundsy....Luke y .. ,, 

Tue.d.y. Matthew J i«.7 7 

Wednesd'yLuke i , .1 

Th.rsdiy..I,_Uh 9 i, 

Fridsy. . . . Romans g ,.-. 

Siturdiy..Jf,., hew _„ I0 ' 2 l g 



Linton's Barber Shop 

Walton. Kentucky 

, V > 

Florence Deposit Bank 
Florence. Kentucky 



.•*\ Hamilton and Jones 
Walton, Kentucky 

Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence, Kentucky 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 
Phone Walton 95 



I Copyright 1950. K. iTKflstfr^trBsbu riTYsH 

Conrad Hardware 
For Service, Large or Small— See Powers 1 

Dixie State Bank 

Walton, Kentucky 

' 

Meador's Grocery 
Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables, Meats 



Roberts Grocery 
Where You Get Quality and Price 



Community Public Service Co., Inc. 
Walton. Kentucky 




Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, March 2, 1950 



D'CLEEK, Hair* Stylist 
Spring Specials 

Machine Permanents . $5.00 Up 

Machineless Permanents . $5.00 Up 

(These Waves Originally $7.50 *Up) 

CALL WALTON 526 FOR APPOINTMENT 



Mrs. Denny Cleek 

South Main Street at Verona Road 



; 



MASTER MIX 



'.VII / A COMPLETE 

SiAitt ■' CONCENTRATES 
^USS' AND 

V/ STRAIGHT FEEDS 



Bring In 250 lbs. Com and Mix with 100 lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig Starter at a low cost of only $3.15 per 100 lbs. 

Walton Feed Mill 

9. . ,***&'■ T|» 




' 2 incorporated 



WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 57 




HENRY'S BOOTERY 

SHOES FOR THE FAMILY! 



Red Goose - Jumping Jacks 

Men's Good Work Shoes 

Boys' Dress Oxfords 

Ball Band Footwear 



Next to Kroger's Super Market - Erlanger, Kentucky 



A 



-The 

JOHN DEERE 

Model "MC" 

Come what may — light, loose soils; 
wet, soggy fields; rough terrain; or 
extreme hillsides — the extra stability, 
flotation, and sure-footed traction of 
the John Deere Model "MC" make it 
the boss on every job. Light tractor 
economy, convenient controls, roomy 
platform, air-cushion seat, and other 
outstanding features are yours in the 
"MC," the little giant of the track- 
types. See us for details . . . soon. 



JOHN DEERE Z-Cylinder TRACTORS 

IpltC xft' /fttHfe/lX, Z^eMfK, 



Yours in a 

JOHN DEERE 

Model MT 

Whether you farm large, medium, 
or small acreages, it will pay you to 
investigate the advantages of owning a 
new John Deere Model "MT." 

It's jam-packed with extra values — 
such outstanding features as Dual 
Touch-o-matic hydraulic control, a 
wide selection of Quik-Tatch equip- 
ment, real operator comfort, wide 
adaptability, money-saving service- 
ability, and amazing economy of 
operation. 

Get all the facts about the "MT." 
Come in soon. 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 



110 PIKE STREET 



COVINGTON, KY. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 
Phone HEmlock 2458 



INDEPENDENCE 1 




Elmer Wayman, farmer on Rich- 
ardson Road, died early Monday 
morning, February 20. He developed 
uremic poison. He was 50 years of 
age, and is survived by his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Wayman, with 
whom he made his home; two bro- 
thers, Arthur and Russell, both of 
Kenton county.'and a niece, Louise. 
The funeral services were held last 
Wednesday at the Radel funeral 
home in Covington, with Rev. W. E. 
Maners officiating. Burial was in 
the Independence Cemetery. The 
sympathy of the community is ex- 
tended to the family. 

E. B. Swiroford's mother, who is in 
very poor health, fell and 'broke her 
arm and is in the hospital. The fam- 
ily is very apprehensive as to her 
recovery. 

The doctor has put -the little six- 
year-old daughter of Willie Clark to 
bed for treatment of tuberculosis. 

Mrs. Henry Doan is reported sick 
again. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Esters of Fowler 
Creek Road are reported sick. Mrs. 
Esters has pneumonia. 

Otis Vance and family have been 
down with colds. 

Victor Tungate, son of James and 
Lenora Tungate, was found dead in 
bed of a heart attack Feb. 22.- His 
fever had gone up some hours be- 
fore to 108, but the. doctor's treat- 
ment had brought ifdpton. He had 
eaten, and drank"' a cup of coffee, 
and later, not feeling well, had gone 
to bed. His wife came an ar^L notic- 
ed something wrong and called for 
help to learn he was dead. Mr. Tun- 
gate had been in failing health fpr 
about a year. He was 57 years old. 
He was born at Fiskjtm-rg and spent 
most of his life there, but the latter 
years were spent at Nicholson. The 
survivors are, his widow, Mrs. Alma 
Brown Tungate; three brothers, Mark 
Tungate, Fiskburg, Perry Tungate, 
Wyoming, Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
John Tungate, Nicholson, and two 
sisters, Mrs. Anna Fisk, Fiskburg, 
"and Mrs. Jessie Chappell, Indepen- 
dence. Only five of a family of 8 
are left. Funeral services were held 
at the Swindler funeral home, Inde- 
pendence, Saturday at 2:00 ip. m., 
with the Wilmington Baptist Church 
furnishing the music, and Rev. W. 
E. Maners officiating. Burial was in 
the Independence Cemetery. Sym- 
pathy of the community is extended 
to the family. 

Frank Stagman reports that he has 
had several weeks sickness, being 
treated by three doctors. He Bos 
lost about 40 pounds, but is now 
getting straightened out. 

O. L. Lucas reports that his fivef- 
months-old baby boy has had the 
influenza, the mumps and infected 
swollen neck glands, but that the 
youngster is apparently on the road 
to recovery. 

Arrangements have been made, 
through the W. M. S. of the Inde- 
pendence Baptist Church to have the 
North Bend Associationail Mission 
ary, Rev. Chase Jennings, speak be 
fore the prayer meeting group on 
Wednesday, March 1st. 

Some of the folk have received a 
letter from Mrs. Shirley Spahr, wife 
of a former pastor of this commun- 
ity. Mrs. Spahr is visiting her sis- 
ter in Florida, and the doctor has 
recommended a change of climate 
for her. 

Miss Mildred Jean Adams has 
been down a week with the flu, but 
is out now. 

The Hi-Y boys, under the spon- 
sorship of M<r. Noel, enjoyed a talk 
by guest speaker, W. E. Maners, *ast 
Tuesday at Simon Kenton. 

Harold Hopper of Mr. Cobb's place 
west of Independence, is down with 
pneumonia. 



Rev. R. IL Williams was down 
Sunday with a temperature of 104 
degrees. Mr. Williams lives on the 
Pelley Road. 

The Loyal Workers class of the 
Independence Christian Church meet 
Thursday night at -the church, with 
Mrs. Carl Fortner, Mrs. Clara Fler- 
lage and .Mrs. Chas. Davis, hostesses. 

The second Tuesday of March, the 
Bradford Chapter, O. E. S. ( will in- 
itiate one candidate. The organiza- 
tion <is young, but having started 
with 63, it now has between 90 and 
100 members. At this initiation 
meeting there will be a "white ele- 
phant sale," and for a little fun and 
to /increase the treasury, each mem- 
ber will donate a penny for each 
inch of her waistline. 

The state meeting of Job's Dau- 
ghters is the second and fourth 
Mondays of each month. 

Mrs. Nell Morgan and her daugh- 
ter Ann, have been shut in due to 
sickness. The Mrs. is fighting the 
la grippe and the daughter virus of 
the lungs. 

The Independence Baptist Church 
has finished the job of Tewiring the 
basement of the church. J. C. Arm- 
strong has been doing the work, 
with the assistance of some of the 
members. 

George Riley, chairman of the 
parsonage fund being supplemented 
for the, purpfrgse of the late Will 
Schoborg residence, says that he is 
doing all right and that most people 
he has talked with are cooperating 
in good" spirit. " 

The senior group of 'Girl Scouts, 
February 21, enjoyed a delightful 
evening in the home of their leader, 
Mrs. Carl Moon. After a business 
meeting refreshments and games 
were enjoyed. The leader and the 
girls attended the Simon Kenton 
basketball game. Mrs. Moon is one 
of the represenatlves for organizing 
the troops and desires that more 
troops be organized and that other 
leaders may be secured.. 

Ethel Mfllbaugh, junior age dau- 
ghter of Charles Mdllbaugh, Pelly 
Road, while playing with the sled 
with other children Sunday after- 
noon, run over a six-foot embank- 
ment and injured herself internally. 
It was thought a kidney was crush- 
ed. She was taken to the hospital. 



Ha milton & Jones i™*.. v™ * g^ n 

Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" 
r-LOWEST PRICES — 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



J 



— new — 



ame 



S 



THEATER 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

FBI. & SAT. MARCH 3-4 

Wall Rogers - Anne Shirley — in 
Steamboat Round the Bend 
. —Plus Second Feature- 
Penny Singleton - Arthur lake 
— in — 
Blondie's Big Deal 

SUN. 4 MON. MARCH 5 - 6 

Errol Flynn and Greer Garson 

That FORSYTE Woman 



TUESDAY i :: MARCH 7 

Jennifer Jones • James Mason 
— in — 

MADAME BOVARY 



WEDNESDAY 



MARCH 8 



Bill Williams - Barbara Hale 

THE CLAY~PIGEON 

THURSDAY II MARCH 9 

James Cagney - Pat O'Brien 

7~ in— . 
Angels With Dirty Faces 



EY£R l/FT Vf PLOW _ 

M7K w£&me% C 




FARMAU-- FIRST IN THE Fl£UD 

Butler Bros. 

Nicholson, Ky. 



Phone Ind. 5053 




BE CAREFUL 
WITH KITES! 




O KEEP KITES AWAY FROM ELECTRIC WIRES 
O USE DRY COTTON STRING ONLY 
NEVER USE METAL ON KITES 
O NEVER CLIMB POLES 



Boys and girls! Kite flying is great fun, 
f but danger lurks when kites are flown near 

electric wires. Don't run the risk of injuring ' 
yourself or causing an electric service inter? 
ruptioti. Follow Reddy's rules and play safe! 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



y<uvi <%>ue*idly. Zlecbuc Company 



Thursday, March 2, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 




Mrs. Mabel Campbell Is a patient 
in Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Pennington 
, of Washington, D. C, are visiting 
Mrs. Pennington's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Daniels, and other rel- 
atives. 

Joe iLeadkamp of Erlanger and 
Donald Menkee were the weekend 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. John Wood 
and family. 

"Buddy" Rouse, who is a student 



at the University of Kentucky, Lex- 
ington, spent the weekend with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Rouse. 

Ladies of the Christian Church 
met Friday afternoon, for prayer ser- 
i vices with Mrs. Stanley Bush. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ransler, Jr. 
of Erlanger, spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. W. Ransler. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Johnson, Jr. 
and baby have moved to their new 
home on Edwards Ave. 



The community Is glad to hear 
that Dr. J. M. Huey has returned 
home from the hospital, where he 
underwent an appendectomy. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harrison Robinson of Bagby Road, 
were Mr. and Mrs. Earl Robinson, 
Miss Katherine Robinson, Mr. and 
Mrs. "Bud" Robinson and son, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert Ashcraft and chil- 
dren, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schadler, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schadler, Jr. 
and son, Miss LaVerne Robinson, 



Florence 



w 



JOHN'S? 

KRAFT DINNER _ 2 for 28c 

TOMATOES— No. 2 can .. 2 for 29c 

KRAFT VELVETA CHEESE ... 2-Ib. pkg. 88c 
MACKEREL— Tall Can 

| Pure Lard v . 2 lbs, 34p j 

SLICED PEACHES— No. 2»/ 2 can 29c 

VAN CAMP CHILLI— lSVi oz. . 29c 

ROSED ALE. PEAS— No. 2 can .. 2 for 25c 

GROUND BEEF „ lb. 55c 

WEEKEND SPECIALS 

SNOW CROP FROZEN STRAWBERRIES 40c 

SNOW CROP MIXED VEGETABLES 25c 



GENERAL 



TRUCKING 



We Haul . . . Cinders, Gravel and Stone for Driveways 
and Roads; also Concrete, Gravel and Sand. 

Joe Kennedy 

PHONE: WALTON 18 or IND. 6495 



■: DAY or NIGHT: 



Model Food Store 



Phone Walton 21 



Floyd Sebree 



We Deliver 



Good Cup Coffee 3-lb. bag $1,79 
Cobbler Potatoes 50 lb. bag $1,49 
Pink Salmon , , tall can 39c 

WHITE VILLA MILK— Large 2 for 23c 

HONEY GROVE SOUP— Large can . 2 for 29c 

SALAD DRESSING— Honey Grove quart 43c 

SEASONING BACON— Sugar Cured pound 15c 
PURE GROUND BEEF— Fresh .... pound 49c 

Fresh Dressed Fryers and Roasters 

No. 2V2 Pumpkin .....'... 

No. 2 Tomato Juice HL 

White or Dark Syrup j. 

12-oz. Tomato Catsup gk 

Pork & Beans— White Villa ___* I I 7* 

Kraut - Spaghetti - Lima Beans 

White and Yellow Cream Style Corn . 

PARKA Y — In plastic bag pound 23c 

JELLO or ROYAL JELLO 3 for 25c 

FRESH COUNTRY EGGS 3 doz. $1.00 

WHITE-O-BLEACH ..... i/ 2 -gal. jug 20c 

SWEETHEART FACE SOAP _ 4 for 25c 

PEANUTS __J ...pound 25c 

OLD F^HION BALOGNA pound 39c 

FRANKFURTERS pound 45c 




Harold Sohadler, Dah^, Ellis and Lern 
Robinson. 

(Mrs. W. S. DeBardelben of War- 
ren, Ohio, was a recent gues,t of Mr. 
and Mrs. Elmer Chapman. 

Mrs. J. T. Stone was the Tuesday 
and Wednesday guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Leo Flynn. Little Miss Kath- 
leen Flynn returned home with her 
for several days visit. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Ferguson en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Levi Penn- 
ingiton and Miss Mildred Porter on 
Sunday for dinner. 

Jesse Callen is on the sick list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marion Stephenson 
had as Sunday guests, Ann Dudgeon, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stephenson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lebus Stephenson and 
daughter, 'Sherry Marlene. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Carpenter en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crow- 
der and daughter of Hamilton, Ohio 
and Ronnie Cleek, Sunday. 

Miss Edna Belle Thornton has re- 
turned to her home at Williamsburg, 
Ohio after a visit with Miss Erances 
Chapman. „ . , 
- Mrs.iMatthew Flynn spent" several 
days last week with friends in Ham- 
ilton, Ohio. She was accompanied 
home Jby Mabel Jackson and Bill 
Roth row. 

A group of the young people of 
the Christian church, who had a per- 
fect attendance record for a period, 
attended the Ice Capades at Cincin- 
nati Gardens, Sunday afternoon. 
Those attending were Mr. and Mrs. 
Clayton Jones and daughters, Patsy 
and Betsy, Mr. and' Mrs. Frank 
Penick and daughter Nora, Misses 
Virginia Lou Schwab, Coreta Rice, 
Bonnie and Glenna Allphin, Layne 
Oheeseman, Junior Jacobs, "Buddy" 
and Jimmy Grubbs and Frankie 
Penick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Nix of Erl- 
anger, were visitors in the home of 
iMr. and Mrs. Scott Lancaster, Sat- 
urday. 

< Mr. and Mrs. Bill Adams and dau- 
ghter Glenna of Nicholson, were the 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Snape and daughter. 

Mrs. Bill Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. 
Scott Lancaster and son Bobby spent 
Sunday in Newport, with Mr. and 
Mrs. Virgil Perry. 

Mrs. 'Ralph Scott is a pajient in 
Booth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burton Garrett, Jr. 
and daughter of Lexington, are visit- 
ing Rev. and Mrs. B. C. Garrett. 

Pat Sturdivent and son of Verona, 
spent Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Dewey Ferguson. 



Mrs. Charles Carpenter was agree- 
ably surprised Friday evening when 
a party of relatives and friends ar- 
rived to join in the celebration of her 
birthday. Tht guests served refresh- 
ments consisting of sandwiches, ice 
cream, the traditional decorated bir- 
thday oake, and coffee. Those par- 
ticipating in the festivities were 
Courtney Hqllis and family and Mr. 
and Mrs. Horace Telly of Hebron; 
Miss iRetha Moulder, Elmer Cummins 
and family, M. G. Martin, and Mr. 
and Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter. We join 
in wishing her many happy returns 
of the day. 

Mrs. Baggett of Etta, Miss., is the 
guest of her daughter, Mrs. Stanley 
Tanner, and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. Miller, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. R. Miller, Blayne Miller 
and Barbee Simpson of Park Hills 
were guests in the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Holden of Ludlow, Mon- 
day evening, Feb. 20th, for a dinner 
and television party. The occasion 
was in honor of Mrs. Holden, who 
Was celebrating a birthday. We join 
in wishing her many happy returns 
of the day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Easterday and 
son moved Tuesday of last week to 
a location in Elsmere. Mr. Easterday 
is pastor of the Erlanger Church of 
Christ. 

Mrs. W. R. Miller visited her niece, 
Miss Jane Penn Kennard of Cynth- 
iarra, :who is in Booth Hospital for 
observation, 

-, Mr. and Mrs. Leo McKenery have 
purchased of L. J. Thompson, the 
new brick home on Lynn 'Street, re- 
cently completed by Mr? Thompson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge Carpenter 
were in Latonia, Friday and Satur- 
day assisting their daughter, Mrs. 
R. G. Keyer, and Mr. Keyer, who 
were moving to the home they re- 
cently purchased in Latonia. 



Rupture Shield 
Expert Here Again 

E. J. MEINHARDI. widely known Rupture (Hernia) Shield Ex- 
port of Chicago and Michigan, will be at the Gibson Hotel in Cin- 
cinnati, 4 days — Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, March 
5th, 6th, 7th and 8th. Office hours, 11 a. m. to 5 p. m. only. (Pos- 
itively no evening office hours). He has been coming here for' 20 
successful years. Thousands recommend him. Ask your neighbors. 

The Meinhardi Shield positively prevents the Rupture or Hernia 
from protruding in 10 days on the average — thereby guarding 
against dangerous strangulation. (No surgery, no medicines or 
injections, and no time lost.) The smallest or largest and most 
difficult cases are all invited. There is no charge for private con- 
sultation or demonstration during above specified days and office 
hours. (This visit is for men only.) 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



BEAVER LICK 



Mrs. May-me Moore of Florence was 
the Thursday guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Moore and son. 

The community extends sympathy 
to the family of Mr. and Mrs. Ross 
Scott in the loss of his father. 

The Rev:- V. V. Hill and wife were 
visiting their daughter in Lexington 
last Wednesday. 

Miss Lee Hoard is much better" af- 
ter suffering from a severe cold all 
of last week. 

Oatney Scott of Cincinnati, was 
visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ross Scott, last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Sutton and 
family were in Walton, Friday night 
visiting her sister, Thelma Rider, 
who is ill at her home. We wish for 
her a speedy recovery. 

1 — - — ■ 

| INDEPENDENCE 



Congratulations go to Herb B. 
Johnson and Florence Loreka Arm- 
strong, who were married last Sat- 
urday morning by the pastor of the 
Independence Baptist Church, W. E. 
Maners. The marriage was perform- 
ed in the pastor's home, in the pres- 
ence of Harry R. Petzinger and Miss 
Rosemary Binder. The newlyweds 
will make their home in Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Collins enter- 
tained the Christian recreation group 
which usually meets each Saturday 
at the Independence Baptist Church 
in their home last Saturday night. 
Games, eats and television were en- 
joyed. 

John E. Tungate of Route 17, near 
Morris Station, turned his car over 
twice when it skidded on the newly 
fallen snow last Saturday evening. 
It scrambled his eggs and groceries, 
but Mr- Tungate got only a slight 
lick below the ear. 

Charles Dorsey, of the local 
Swindler funeral home, has been 
nighting virus pneumonia. 

Troy Mullins of Menifee county 
started his broiler project in Janu 
ary with 1,000 chicks. 

Gid Lewis of Leslie county report- 
ed his fruit yield was increased con- 
siderably last year after he sprayed 
his 1,200-tree orchard. 

Leo Lawson, Mercer county 4-H 
I boy, sold 1,056 pounds of tobacco 
1 from a half -acre for $585.40. 



w. & w. 

Electrical Contractors 

WIRING 

Of All Kinds — Guaranteed! 

Phone 26 



W. W. Ryle 
W. W. Green 



WALTON 



OUR FARMAU- MAN , SWS : 



"DRIVE THI5 
r/IRMAi-L CUB " 




"liwW/.CS 




FARMALL-TWe-PROVeP FOR IMPROVED FKRMlfffr 

BUTLER BROS. 

Phone Ind. 5053 Nicholson, Ky. 



**i 





AUCTION 



Being unable to secure the proper help to continue the dairy business, I will sell 
at Public Auction my entire dairy herd, equipment and .beef cattle at my farm — 
2 MILES WEST of FLORENCE, KY., on the Burlington Road, U. S. 18, on 

Sat., March 11 



12:30 
P.M. 



12 HEAD DAIRY CATTLE— 2 6-year-old Holstein cows with calves Jby side; 
8-year-old registered Holstein cow with calf by side; 6-year-old registered Jersey 
cow with' calf by side; 4-year-old Jersey cow, giving good flow of milk; 5-year-old 
Holstein cow, giving good flow of milk ; 6-year-old Holstein cow, giving good flow 
of -milk; 6-year-old Holstein cow, close springer; Guernsey heifer, close springer; 
3-year-old registered Holstein bull; I 8-months-old purebred Holstein bull; Jersey 
bull, 1 months oldl, purebred. This herd has recently been T. B. and Bangs tested 
and is an exceptionally good dairy herd. 

10 HEAD BEEF CATTLE— 3-year-old Hereford cow ; 3-yr.-old Shorthorn cow ; 
Hereford heifer, springer ; Shorthorn heifer, yearling ; 2 Whitef ace heifers., yearlings ; 
Hereford heifer; Red heifer, yearling; 1 4-mon'ths-old Hereford bull; 5-months-old 
Hereford bull. 

JDAIRY EQUIPMENT— DeLaval milking machine with 2 units; Esco 4-can milk 
cooler; 7 ten-gallon milk cans. This equipment is practically new. 



: TERMS CASH 



James R. Rice 

Tanner Bros., Auctioneers 

Chas. M. Tanner, Florence — Phone 728 David L. Tanner, Walton — Phone 155 






1 



Page Six 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, March 2, 1950 



BABY CHICKS 

$ 1 3.50 per 1 00 

Licensed and Approved by Kentucky Department of Agriculture 



OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 

WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 

POULTRY LITTER - REMEDIES 

— TUXEDO FEEDS 



Garden Seed - Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 



FLORENCE 



Mrs. M. M. Graham and a party of 
friends from Park Hills were guests 
on the Ruth Lyons "Fifty Club" tele- 
vision program on Monday of last 
week. 

Recent visitors in the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. B. Miller were Mrs. 
John Dolwiek, Jr. and Mrs. Paul 
Chaney. 

Mrs. J. F. Dau'ghenty is visiting her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Martin of Lud- 
low. 

Lon Clore has retired from active 
duty at the Aetna service station. 
Dixie Highway and Shelby Street, 
Florence. The business has WN?n 
taken over by Robert G. Barrett, who 
will be on duty every day in the 
week, including Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Russ and party 
arrived home Friday following a va- 
cation in Florida. 



Harris, son of Mr. and Mis. Earl 
Carpenter of Kensington, underwent 
a tonsillectomy at St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital,' recently. 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Day of Pitts- 
burgh, were recent guests of her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Lloyd Rouse, and family, al- 
so relatives in Erlanger and Union. 

Miss Mary Jane Utz, (registered 
nurse, is on duty at the Veterans' 
Hospital, Ft. Thomas. 

Kenneth Stamper vms removed to 
the Veterans' Hospital, Ft. Thomas, 
Wednesday. His many friends wish 
him the best. 

Mr. and »Mrs. Mortimer Moss of 
Erlanger concluded their visit with 
their daughter, Mrs. Robert Carpen- 
ter, her husband and their children 
of Tucson, Ariz., and returned home 
Friday. They had an enjoyable 
time and were reluctant to leave the 
wonderful climate of that locality. 

Rev. R. R. Patton delivered a fine 
discourse at the Florence Methodist 
Church, Sunday morning, his text 
being, "The Lord's' Prayer." 



^— 



EXPERT 
WASHER 
REPAIR 

Any Make 

Parts for All 
Popular Makes 

Just Give Us A Call 
DIXIE 7113 




HAGEDORN-'S 



856 Dixie Highway 



Erlanger, Kentucky 



will Mft0? mim 

fADE? 




Rev. S. J. Bradley, a former stu- 
dent at Kentucky Wesleyan College, 
Winchester, attended the homecom- 
ing of the alumni February 11-12. 
Rev. Bradley also attended services 
at the Methodist church in Winches- 
ter which he helped to organize. On- 
ly two of the charter members are 
living, he being one of them. En- 
route home he visited his daughter 
in Lexington. 

Sunday guests of the J. T. Step- 
hensons were Mr. and Mrs. F. E. 
Fisher and Miss Trudy Gadd of 
Walton; Dave Win-gate and family, 
Clayton Brown and family and Syd- 
ney Ambrose and wife. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. MiMer were 
surprised Sunday when members of 
their family and several friends ac- 
companied them home from church, 
the occasion being in observance'of 
the 51st anniversary of their mar- 
riage. Dinner guests included Mr. 
and Mrs. M. M. Graham of Park 
Hills, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hogan of 
Covington, Mr-. 'and Mrs. Paul Chan- 
ey and Mrs. W. R.iMi Her. Afternoon 
callers were Mr. and -""7- ~,L.. ~*j~" 
den of Ludlow, and Mr. and Mrs. 
John Dolwiek, their daughter Dotty, 
and sons Ronald and James. We 
join in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
many more years together. 



CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to express our thanks to 
all friends and neighbors Who help- 
ed us in our time of grief. Especial- 
ly do we thank the flower donors; 
those who helped prepare the grave; 
the food donors; the singers; Rev. 
Ervin Stevenson, and Rev. Joe John- 
son; those who helped during ill- 
ness, and the Hamilton funeraj 
home. 

Mrs. W. W. Scott and Children. 

* ■ 

Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



In Leslie county, 49,00t) trees were 
set last year. 

James Farris of Knox county sold 
3,012 pounds of Ky. 35 tobacco from 
one and two-tenths acres, or 2,510 
pounds an acre. 




When The Crash 
kJ Comes - Be • ■ .. 
Protected 

/^^^ttutual Insurance 
^^ Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON. KY. 



Tractor Tires 

REPAIRED and FILLED with SOLUTION 

We aire now equipped to do expert 
Tractor Repairing and Filling. 

CALL WALTON 38 

B-M SALES & SERVICE 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

MOMFY^ corp. 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 
Phone HEmlock 2458 




Dreams can be so beautiful — and seem so real. Then 
suddenly, with a puff, they're gone. 

BUT your dream of some day owning a farm debt- 
free need riot be a vision which disappears — you can 
make it a reality ! 

Get a firm, secure hold on your future — on the farm 
you've dreamed of owning outright — by financing it 
through your local National Farm Loan Association, 
with a Federal Land Bank Loan. 

A Federal Land Bank Loan gives you all these worth- 
while advantages: 

# A low interest rate . . . only 4 % , 

# Long-term ... up to 40 years, 

• Small semi-annual payments, 

# No appraisal fees, 

# No renewal commissions, 

• No penalty on PRE-payments, 

• *>Leniency in times of stress, 

• Cooperative ownership of your source of credit. 

Call, Write or See 

CARL SHERIFF, Secretary-Treasurer 

Williamstown & Boone County National Farm Loan Association 

WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. PHONE 2861 



ABSOLUTE 




The heirs of the late Thomas Sutton have contracted with me to sell at Absolute Auction, their 633-acre farm with a beautiful 8-room 
country home and all household furniture and some antinques on 

8 " SAT.. MARCH 4 '" 4 



Acres 



J 



Tracts 



1 :00 P. M. SHARP - FAST TIME - RAIN OR SHINE 



Located a short distance from State Highway 22, between Williamstown and Falmouth, Ky. Follow auction 
arrows— U. S. 27 to State Route 22, go to Perry's Store on 22, 2 miles Southeast; U. S. 25 to Williamstown, 
turn on State Highway 22, follow 22 to Morgan Road, on right and follow auction arrows. 

The farm will be sold in the following tracts — will not be grouped (the acreage given is approximate, how- 
ever, the survey was completed by engineer Feb. 28, and prospective buyers may see plaque ; land staked and 
flagged): 

TRACT NO. I — Home tract, 373 acres, 3,000 feet of road frontage, beautiful 8-room country home with 3 
halls, magnificent stairways, full basement, furnace,. 2 porches. This is really an outstanding country home, all 
spacious rooms, well kept, workmanship of the best. Floors and woodwork can be only appreciated when you 
see them ; has beautiful setting with large lawn and an abundance of shade trees. Telephone and electric. In- 
cluded in this tract will be 2 large barns and outbuildings. . 

TRACT NO. 2 — 1 2 acres with double corn crib and shed, 1 ,700 feet road frontage. 

TRACT NO. 3—28 acres, 1 ,000 feet road frontage. 

TRACT NO. 4 — 2 1 8 acres, tenant house and barn, 1 ,000 feet road frontage. 

Here's your chance to hedge against inflation, be independent, buy a good farm. Best investment you can make. Located close to 
State Highway, also close to schools, churches and stores, and since U. S. 27 is completed, ifs only a few minutes drive to Covington 
and Cincinnati. Farm has been in this family for over a century. Lot of good virgin soil. Kentucky State Park Board has been 
considering this farm for the site in this area of a new state park. Be sure to be on hand day of sale — starts promptly at 1 :00 p. m. 

TERMS; On Real Estate, 20% down, Day of Sale, balance with deed and possession, on or before 30 days. 

R. P. COLEMAN 

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION SALES 

Florence, Ky. Highway 42 Phone Florence 148 

Bud Hamilton, Auctioneer, Winchester, Ky. 



»* 



Thursday, March 2, 1950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Seven 



Baby Chicks 



Pullorum Pas#»4 N. H. Reds - White Rocks 

Member of Kentucky Poultry Improving Assn. 

Jamesway Equipment - Salisbury Remedies 

Provico Feeds 



-\ 



Pollitt'S Hatchery & Supplies 



FLORENCE, KY. 



PHONE 159 




—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



FOR SALE— No. 1 and mixed hay, 
baled. Dance Bros., Walton. Ph. 
514 or 926. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE — Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. tf-1 

FOR SALE— Hay, straw, corn, alf- 
alfa, mixed hay, timothy, wheat 
or oat straw. Russell Klein, 
Morning Viey, Ky. Phone Ind. 6427 

6t-5* 



BABY CHICKS— Special Sale for Sun- 
day and Monday, ONLY. 1 electric 
brooder, 100 baby chicks and 100 
pounds feed, aU for $24.90. Real 
Bargain. Don't miss it. Mt. 
Healthy Hatcheries, Winton and 
McKelvey Roads, Mt. Healthy, 
Ohio. Phone Jackson 9354. .. lt-8 



FOR SALE — New 5-room house, large 
basement, furnace, 1 acre ground, 
on Wayman Drive, cheap. Hez 
Durr, Independence, Ky. 2t-8 



FOR SALE— Team 9-year-old mares, 
and good set tug harness; or will 
trade for good pick-up truck. Vir- 
gil Whaley, 14 Locust, Walton. 

2t-8* 



FOR SALE — Two yearling Hereford 
bulls, ready for service; 14 head of 
sheep and on# buck. James B. El- 
liston, Verona. 2t-8* 



FOR SALE — Team of work horses, 8 
years old. G. R. Epperly, Bullock 
Pen Road. Phone Ind. 6696. 4t-8* 



. 



Public Sale 

(Postponed from February 25, because of bad weather) 

Having sold my farm through the Harry F. Johnson 
Auction Co. and going into the grocery business, I will 
sell my Tools, Stock, etc., 

1 MILE NORTH OF MORNING VIEW, KY. 

Sat., March 4th 

—Beginning at 1 : 00 P. M. — 

Team of good horses and harness; 3 Holstein heifers, 
1 year old; bull, 8 months old; 1 948 Ford tractor, plows, 
harroW, cultivator, side mower, pullies, belt, saw, jack, 
chains, weed spray, all tractor tools; silo cutter; 2-horse 
corn planter; new 'sled; iron-wheel wagon; hay bed; 
John Deere mower on rubber; 60-tooth harrow; hillside 
plow; Rastus plow; hay rake; hoes, forks and all kinds 
of small tools; 3,500 tobacco sticks; some loose lumber; 
milk vat and heater; 10 ten-gallon cans; dining room 
suite, 9-piece, almost new; 2 beds and springs; sausage 
mill; glass churn; good coal range; girl's bicycle; new 
door; 3 tons baled soybeans; tobacco press; some corn, 
and other items too numerous to mention. 

Joe Finnell 

Owner — Phone Ind. 6899 

HARRY F. JOHNSON 

Real Estate & Auction Sales — Phone Ind. 6196 

CARL JUSTICE— CLERK 



WANTED — Someone to raise % acre 
of tomatoes on shares, located in 
Walton. See John Gray, after 6 
p. m., 118 South Main St., Walton, 
Ky. 



lt-9« 



RUSSELL'S Refrigeration and Appli- 
ance Service — Refrigerators, milk 
coolers, pumps, etc. Phone Inde- 
pendence 7430. 4t-7* 



FOR SALE— Beautiful building lot, 
level, pavement laid, fenced, ap- 
proximately 70'x280', about 200 ft. 
from Dixie Highway, $1,000. J. T. 
Cooke, Crittenden, Ky. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE— Feed grinder, 6-ln. steel 
burs, ear corn or small grain; end 
gate lime or fertilizer spreader; 
wood wheel wagon with box bed. 
Walter Maddox, Nicholson. Phone 
Ind. 7486. 2t-8* 



check, payable to the Kentucky Re- 
search Foundation, William S. Tay- 
lor Memorial Fund, to Dr. Frank G. 
Dickey, Dr. Taylor's successor as 
dean of the College of Education. 



GLENCOE 



NEE 



SEE 



FAMILY FINANCE 



FOR SALE— 3-piece bathroom, 5 -ft. 

tub on base, toilet and wash basin, 

a nice one, price $35.00; will trade. 

Russell Chapman, Blanchester, O. ., 

Phone -Blartghester 22.53. •*^lt-9^.jF.rL a ~j|»grt> shocked to hear 
——"«, ' "* *^.^- rwr^mr&SPof Deen Richards, v 

FOR SALE— Two purebred O. I. C. 

boars; team farm "mares; will sell 

or trade for oattle. C. D. McDan- 

nold. Phone Ind. 5022R. 2t-8* 



FOR SALE — Fryers, dressed or on 
foot. Mrs. Ethel Sheppard. Phone 



Walton 1813. 



lt-9 



FOR SALE — Very good high protein 
Soybean hay, baled, $25.00 ton. 
Phone Ind. 6882. tf-6 



Mrs. Blanche Poland spent the 
weekend with her mother, Mrs. Liza 
Carlton. 

The Father and Son banquet was 
well attended at the schoolhouse on 
Thursday evening, from the Baptist 
Church. 

C. E. Perry, wife and son had a 
bad accident driving from Warsaw 
to Gleneoe, when he was passed by 
a Greyhound bus, he gave too much 
rightofway, got off the highway, and 
when he got back on the road, was 
hit by a car. He is now in Booth 
Hospital. 

It seems moving days are here 
again. A lot -of changes being made. 

Mrs. M. Cooper has a real bad cold 
and we hope for her early recovery. 

Sympathy is .extended the- Scott 
family in the death of Dub Scott. 

of 
who 
passed away suddenly last week. 
Sympathy is extended the family. 

J. D. Sutherland is improving 
slowly at his home here. 



MHMITY^ corp. 

*** V ** M b A • 427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Yards 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market in the 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to us. Why 
not now? 

Reference: Ask the first 
man you meet 



«*j»^r: 



—IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID?— 






Public Sale 

1 am retiring from the farm and will sell at Auction 

2 MILES WEST OF VERONA, KENTUCKY 
(At the Nell Hamilton Farm) 

Sat'day, March 1 1 

— Beginning at 1 :00 P. M. — 

2 mares, good workers ; 2-year-old unbroke colt ; cow, 
5 years old, calf just gone ; 3-year-old cow, milking well ; 
40 laying hens; wagon and box bed; 2-horse sled; mow- 
ing machine; disc harrow; hay rake; new Rastus plow; 
land plow; hoes, forks, and other small tools of all kinds; 
gas stove with meter; bedstead; couch; table and six 
chairs; wood heater; 8-day clock, and other items too 
numerous to mention, < 

JAMES BREWER 

HARRY F. JOHNSON 

Auctioneer — Phone Independence 6196 
iii. CLERK: CARL JUSTICE 



BABY CHICKS— Ohio U. S. Approved 
— Pullorum Controlled. Chicks arei 
hatching every Sunday, (Monday, | 
and Thursday. Plenty of chicks on ! 
hand af all times. Open day and 
night. New Hampshires, White & 
Barred Rocks, $10.90 per 100; all 
pullets, $13.90; cockerels, $11.50. 
S. C. White Leghorns, $11.90 per 
100; pullets, $24.50; cockerels, $3. 
Buff, White & Black Minorcas, 
Buff Leghorns, Austra Whites, 
$12.90 per 100; pullets, $26.00; 
cockerels, $6.00. S. C. Reds, Buff 
Rocks, Buff Orphfrigtons, White 
Wyandottes, Rock X Hamps, Hamp 
X Rocks, $11.90; pullets, $f4.90; 
cockerels, $12.50. White & Black 
Giants, Light Bnahmas, $13.95. 
Heavy assorted, all heavies, $9.50. 
Plenty of started chicks. One week 
old, $13.90 per 100; two weeks old, 
$17.90; three weeks old, $22.90. 
White Pekin Ducklings, $30.00 per 
100. Order your turkey poults now, 
for delivery any time after March 
15, at $89.00 per 100. Turkeys and 
Ducks hatching on Sundays only. 
We carry a full line of poultry sup- 
plies, feeders and founts, poultry 
remedies and thermometers. Drive 
to this modern hatchery and see 
these exceptional bargains. Visit 
ors welcome. Phone Jackson 9354. 
Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, Winton & 
McKelvey Roads, Mt. Healthy, O. 

lt-8 

TAYLOR MEMORIAL FUND 
ESTABLISHED AT U. K. 

A scholarship fund for assisting 
needy students who desire to enter 
the teaching profession has been es- 
tablished at the University of Ken- 
tucky in honor of -the late Dr.. Wil- 
liam S. Taylor, dean of the U. K. 
College of Education for 26 years 
prior to his death last yeaT. Per- 
sons wishing to make contributions 
to the fund may do so by sending a 



GUARANTEED 
REPAIR SERVICE 

— on all makes of — 

Washers, Wringers, Irons, 
Sweepers, Fans, Toasters, 
Water Pumps - Fire Ex- 
tinguisher Sales & Service. 

JOS. F. BECK - Ind. 7497 

Independence, Ky. 



£V£R l/FT '/I PlOW * 
M7W OA/£ F/M<?£% f 



DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCH 

JEWELERS 

6 1 3 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday, 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 




FARMAU-- FIRST IN THE *\ttf> 

Calvin Cress & Sons mm 

BURLINGTON, KY. PHONE 79 ^|jf 







Pontiac Trade-in Sale 

Reconditioned - Guaranteed 

'49 Pontiac "6" sedan; Hy dramatic, 2-tone grey $1995 
'49 Chevrolet deluxe sedan coupe; looks new $1595 
'48 Oldsmobile "6" Hy dramatic, 2iDoor . . $1695 
'47 Chevrolet Stylemaster 2-door, beautiful blue $1095 
'47 Dodge black de luxe sedan $1295 

'46 Ford super de luxe maroon club coupe; unusual $895 

'41 Pontiac, black 2-door, 6 cylinder .... $695 

*39 Dodge club coupe . . # . $395 

'37 Ford Fordor sedan, very clean . . * . $295 
'37 Chevrolet 2-door sedan, good transportation $195 
'47 Alma House Trailer, 24rft, Frigidaire, range $1595 

Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 
TERMS TO SUIT! " UP TO 24 MONTHS TO PAY! 

Castleman Pontiac 



1722 MADISON AVE. 



CO 4224 



COVINGTON, KY. 







<£$ 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, March 2, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION '^W 



Classified advertising rate is 25c 

per ad for less than 25 words; 

over 25 words, lc per word. 

All ads cash in advance. 



FOR SALE— Case pickup baler, 4- 
cylinder Wiscnosin air colled mo- 
to, in, A-l shape. Phone Burling- 
ton 7§ or 481X. 2t-9* 



SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if ordered 
now! For prices and information, 
call A. R. Kwozalla, Erlanger, Ky., 
Route 4. Phone Florence 593. tf-49 

REFRIGERATOR, &x2% K self-ervice, 
electric, used as vegetable case, 
butter box, bottle cooler ; also one 
deep freeze box, 10 cu. ft. Phone 
HEmlock 5652. Very reasonable. 

2t-9 



STARTED CHICKS at Bargain Prices! 
Thousands on hand. All breeds. 
One week old, $13.90 per 100; two 
weeks old, $17.90; three weeks old, 
$22.90. Plenty of feed, brooders and 
poultry supplies. Come to Che 
hatchery and see these bargains. 
Vicitors welcome. Mt. Healthy 
Hatcheries, Wlnton & McKelvey 
Roads, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. Phone 
Jackson 9354. lit-6 



FOR SALE — 75 tons good quality 
mixed clover and timothy hay, 
70% clover. Ralph Jones, Pleasant 
Plain, Ohio; 30 miles Northeast of 
Cincinnati. „ 4t-6* 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — It works, 
it pays, it gets calves. Sign up In 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J. M. Tay- 
lor, Walton 582. . tf-45 



FOR SALE — Jersey cows, heifers, 
calves artificially sired and bred, 
some open; T. B. and Bang tested. 
Ishmael & Jackson, Kenton, Ky. 
Phone Ind. 6408. 4t-9 



FOR SALE— First, second and third 
cutting of alfalfa, baled; timothy 
and cloyer; also timothy and c^"* 
er, mixed. McBee Bros., Williams- 
town. Phone Williamstown 4192 
or 4073. 8t-4* 



FOR SALE— Set work harness and 
turning plow. Eli Russell, Bank 
Lick Station. Phone Ind. 6252. 

2t-9* 



FOR SALE— Kentucky U. S. approv- 
ed, pullorum passed chicks, White 
Rocks and N. H. Reds. Pollett's 
Hatchery & Supplies, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 159. Jamesway Equipment, 
Salisbury Remedies and Provico 
Feeds. - - • " 4t-6 



WANTED — "A" harrow, in good 
condition. Joe Messingschlager, 
1 mile from Kenton Station. Phone 
Ind. 6422. uq* 

FOR SALE — Team of work horses, 
cheap— $150.00. Ind. 5064. Old 
Kentucky Home Farm, Nicholson, 
Ky- . 2t-8 

FOR SALE — Eleven ewes and 16 
lambs; 9 shoats, weigh about 70 
pounds each. Bruce Allen, Wal- 
ton-Nicholson Highway. lt-9* 



BABY CHICKS, AAAA Grade Rocks, 
Reds, Wyandottes, Orphingtons, 
Australorps, Leghorns, Anconas. 
Also special table grade chicks, 
no sex or breed guaranteed and 
brooder plans $6.95 per 100. Pre- 1 
paid. From U. S. Approved Pul- 
lorum Passed Flocks. Breeder plans 
without chicks for making oil or! 
electric brooder to raise 50 to 200 
chicks to fryers $2.00. HoosierJ 
716 West Jefferson, Louisville, Ky. | 

tf-7, 



FOR SALE— All-white Estate coal or 
wood range, good condition. Mel- 
vin Piatt, Walton, Route 1, Green 
RoSB. Phone Ind. 7127. lt-9* 



FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR-r 
_Ficst class v^-'- jwmnteed, go/^ 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf-2 



FOR SALE— Fresh cows, Jersey and 
Holstein, Guernseys with calves by | 
side, also heavy springers, and; 
stock cattle. James Coyle, Veronaf 
Ky- 2t-9* 



FARMS WANTED— Small or large; < 
we have a large list of customers 
iBg. For quick, reliable realty 
service, call us. Sallee Real Estate 
Co., 108 Locust St., Erlanger, Ky. 
Phone Dixie 7119. tf-4 



Hamilton & Jones 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



Invites You to Shop! 






The Capehart Prelude $279.95 

with Polat Mina (built-in atrial) 

NOW 

TELEVISION 

with 2 Great Exclusi ves 

Exclusive Capehart Tone 

brings television to life! 

Exclusive Polatron* Tube 

brings new clarity to every 
image! 

SEE... HEAR CAPEHART TODAY! 
Prices start at $239.95 



To Prove You Can't Match a 

FRIGIDAIRE 

Master Model fcr 1950 



Service on all types of 
household electric appli- 
ances by Hall's Electric 
and Appliance Service lo- 
cated in store basement. 



Immediate 
Delivery 




Monthly Terms 
If Desired 



Wherever you live — whatever 
rhe size of your family, kitchen 
or budget— be sure to see the 
new Frigidaire Refrigerators 
for 1950. See the complete 
line of sizes from 4 to 17 cu. ft. 
— see all the reasons why your 
No. 1 choice is America's No. 1 
Refrigerator, FRIGIDAIRE! 

NEW gold-and-white "target" 
latch and trim 

NEW Super-Storage design 
with full-length door on larger 
models 



NEW improved Meter-Miser 

NEW shelves are all-alumi- 
num and rust-proof 

NEW split shelf allows room 
for large, bulky items 

NEW swing -down shelf for 
butter, cheese, small items 

NEW all -porcelain Twin Hy- 
drators that stack up 

NEW all-porcelain Meat 
Storage Tray 



| CONRAD HARDWARE 



RD^ 



1 950 IS HERE 



and this is going to be a great year 
Just as the years we have left behind us while living in and around Walton. It is 
a small, country town, but I like it don't you? We want you to visit Conrad Hard- 
ware this year every time you want to loaf or buy something or even borrow. We 
try to keep a good fire, plenty of seats, and lots of ice water. We. I mean Ray. 
Chick and Powers, do now and always try to give the best of service. 

We have added a drill press to our work shop to drill holes in steel for you. as 
we carry flat, round and angle soft steel bars. We also have an electric pipe 
threading machine and carry all sizes of galvanized pipe and fittings, y 8 " to 2". 
Do you want to wire your barn or house or put in some extra floor plugs? We have 
all the material. Do you need some new window shades, any size? We cut them 
"off for only a dime. You always need to replace the worn linoleum rug with a new 
one. either 9'xl2'. 12'xl2' or 12'xl5'. Every person on a rural route needs their name 
on the mail box. We will put it on one side for S1.00 or both sides for $1.75. This 
name plate is an aluminum strip with baked black enameled letters, to bolt on 
your box— or we will sell you a new box and put letters on it- *~ 

When you need a new range to cook on, we have some of the best. In electric 
it is Perfection and Gibson; in gas it is Perfection, Maytag and Vesta; in kerosene 
it is Perfection, Boss or Quick Meal. When you need a coal range, always buy 
Knox Mealmaster, Brown or Red Mountain. 

We have added a small line of farm tools, such as Cobey all-metal tractor 
manure spreader. l.^ey. Harris horse drawn manure spreader. Vulcan 12-16 horse 
drawn disc harrow, rubber tired wagon tractor hitch, Massey- Harris, Bemis, Tiger 
and New Holland tobacco setters. Chicken raising is a profitable business this year 
with Jamesway oil and electric brooders; also those sanitary Jamesway feeders 
and fountains. If you raise chickens profitably, you have to keep them warm and 
have clean food for them. For those who'do not want to work, or do not have to. 
we have a good stock of fishing tackle, guns and rifles. 

For the ladies, who will soon start housecleaning and redecorating, we have 
that good Bolce paints and enamels; also Flozotone cosine water mix paint and 
that wine finish Interior Gloss paint for walls and woodwork. We also have Cincy 
and Wallwet wallpaper cleaner, Magic-Foam, Old English cleaning powder, and 
Soilax powdered cleaner. Do you n«ed Venetian blinds? We have stock sizes or 
we can measure your windows and have them made, very reasonably. 

We cannot have everything for everyone's needs and wants, but we try to have 
the most of them, at reasonable prices, and try to give you a little extra service at 
a little or no charge. Come in and look around—we are always glad to have you 
whether you buy or not. 




! •„»-.. 



for Service 



Large or Small 
. . . See Powerj 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES OF HOUSEHOLD 
duawc 07 APPLIA\CLS 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKy 



. . ' . . ■**'" 



FOR SALE — Horse-drawn manure 
spreader, ohn Deere, model "E." 
$150.00. Sam Jackson, Kenton, 
Ky. lt-9* 



SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE— All nationally advertised 
sewing (machines sold and repair- 
ed ait reasonable prices. Free home I 
estimates. Phone E. Thobe, AXtel ! 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine Co., Cin- 
oinnatl's largest Independent sew- 

ing machine dealers. tf-1 I 

, • , 

LOOK FOLKS— 100 Whjte Leghorn 
cockerels, $3.00. First come, first 
served. A bargain. Fine for broil- 
ers. Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, Win- 
ton & McKelvey Roads, Mt. 
Healthy, Ohio. lt-8 



FOR SALE— Two-row cultivator for 
Case tractor; also roan mare, a- 
bout 1400 lbs. Phone Ind. 6435. 

jat-8* 

FOR SALE— 5-tier electric chicken 
battery, in fine shape; 4-tier fin- 
ishing battery; 6 wire coops. H. 
C. Bacon, Walton, Route 2, first 
house North of Beacon Lite. 2t-8 



FOR SALE— Large Estate Heatrola,. 
gas, 5-room size, can be converted 
toJtKrttle gas; also two smaill gas 
heaters. Phone Walton 526. lt-9 



Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued on Page 7) 



FOR SALE — Piano, cheap; 2-unit 
Farm (Master electric milker; 6- 
can Farm Master cooler; team of 
horses, large, well broke, 11 years 
old. C. H. Hand, near Piner, Ky. 
Phone Ind. 6197. Will tirade for 
young cattle or sheep. 2t-9* 



FOR SALE — 200 bushels of corn. 
Henry Brewster. Phone Walton 
783. 2t-9* 



FOR SALE— Some walnut and red 
oak timber in the tree, also some 
■large sycamore .trees. Call on or 
phone, Roy D. Webster, Verona, 
Ky., Route 1; Gdencoe 2673. 2t-8 

FOR SALE or TRADE-^Hammermill 
with gasoline motor. P. J. Maddin, 
Walton, Ky., Route 2. Phone Wal- 
ton 271. 2t-9 



FOR SALE— Six -room modern home,. 
16 Edwards Ave., Walton. Apply 
H. R. Fisher. 2t-9* 



WANTED — Load of wood, cut in 
lengths of 1 foot or thereabout, for 
furnace. Emma Jane Miller, the 
Rawleigh Dealer, 107 South Main 
St., Walton. Phone 565. lt-9 



FOR SALE— 40 or 50 bales alfalfa, 
second or third cutting, good sheep 
hay; also 60 bushels hand picked 
ear corn. G. H. Moore. Phone 
Walton 516. 2t-9* 



FOR SALE— Registered Angus male,. 
Quisenberry breed. R. D. Hogan, 
Dry Ridge, Ky. Phone Williams- 
town 8231. 2t-9* 



YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. tf-46 



FOR SALE— Alfalfa hay, 2 to 3 tons, 
first and second cuttings, good 
sheep hay. Ben Menke, Walton, 
Ky. • lt-9* 



INSURANCE SERVICE —Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers it's 
members life insurance, auto and 
truck insurance (largest in Ken- 
tucky), fire and windstorm cover- 
age, corruprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tf-2 



FOR SALE — Two horses, coming 4 
and 9, weigh 1400 each, good work- 
ers, 1 good single liner, ready to 
work. M. J. Worthington, Braeht- 
Piner Road. 2t-9* 




'46 Chev. 2-Door Fleetline 
clean — » 

'48 Chev. 2-Door Fleetline 
clean — 



'41 Plymouth 2-Door 
'37 Chevrolet Coupe 

'49 Ford V-8 4-Door 

• clean — 



'41 Chev. 5-Pass. Coupe 

excellent — 



'48 Chevrolet Truck 

2-ton- 161" 

Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 



Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE'IND. 5004 



Also Cooking, 
Water Heating 
and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, KY. 






WALT 





— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — <■ 

■ BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 



Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



serving a progressive community • 

Walton, Kentucky — Thursday, march 9, 1950 



JL 




Volume 35 — Number 10 



Boone Citizens Health 
Commitee is Planned 



Every Organization 
Asfced to Cooperate 



Every organization in the county 
is urged to send a representative to 
a meeting to be held in the Burling- 
ton Courthouse on Tuesday, March 
14, 1950 at 8:00 p. in. The meeting 
will be open to all who wish to at- 
tend, but each organization repre 



Mt. Zion Homemakers 

The Mt. Zion Homemakers held 
their regular monthly meeting on 
March 1st at the home of Mrs. Frank 
Bresser. 

The meeting was called to order 
by the president, Mrs. Frank Do- 
maschko. The Homemakers were 
glad to have with them at this meet- 



ing, iMiss Nancy McClaskey, newiaje of Walton-Verona High School 

\f\Y\ Arrant sit Urtn'^ia ^^ -o -h ^ * 



'|w* serve-W #* Citizens- Health Com 
mlttee for Boone county. The four 
citizens selected will serve with a 
physician, a- dentist and* a magistrate 
(to form the Committee. 



Home Demonstration Agent of Boone 

.County. The club was pleased to 

sented will be entitled to only one welcome Mrs . Euge ne Parson as a 

vote each. * • | new member 

This meeting is being held to se- 1 Mter a ^^ Ju h m ]addes 

^J^^^L^L^t^ 1 ^^^^ Jr^^^Stttrmiesson, 

"Planning Everyday Meals," given 

by Mrs. Roger McGuire and; Mrs. 

William Miller. ♦ 

Those attending were Mesdaines 

. Romer Burns, Orville Noel, Frank 
Complete details will be presented Domaschk0| A> j Albe ' Frank 

at the meeting Every organization Bresser Robert Wood ^ M 
in the county is urged to send one Guire William Miller> an | David 

official representative to the meet- . Volz Pub 0hm 

ing. _> 

Mre. Roy C. Lutes, Florence, has 
been requested by Dr. Bruce Under- 
wood, State Health Commissioner, to 
assist in the organization of the 
Committee for our county, 



The cooperation of the organiza- 
tions and the people of Boone coun- 
ty is requested in this endeavor to 
give the people a greater opportuni- 
ty to develop the type of public 
health program they want. 

Training Class On Foods 

The second "Foods Class," will be 
held at the Florence Community 
Hall at 10 o'clock, Thursday, March 
16th. Mrs. Pearl J. Haak, Food 
Specialist from the University of 
Kentucky, will give the -lesson on 
"Social Hour Refreshments For Any 
Occasion." 

Remember, two leaders from each 
club, and we will have a 100% at- 
tendance. 

Northern Kentucky District 
Federation Planning Meeting 

The Northern Kentucky District 
Federation Planning meeting will be 
held in Covington, March 10 in the 
Federal Building at 10:00 a. m. 

Mrs. Clyde Arnold, District Pub- 
licity Chairman; Mrs. Earl More- 
head, County Homemakers Presi- 
dent, and Miss Nancy McClaskey, 
Home Demonstration Agent, will at- 
tend this meeting Friday. 

Happy Helpers Meet 

"The Church Serving In a Rural 
Community," was the topic discuss- 
ed by Rev. Vilas Hill, of the Boone 
County Parish, before members of 
the Happy Helpers class of the Wal- 
ton Methodist Church, which was 
held recently in the home of Miss 
Louise Conrad. 

The yearbook committee reported 
that the books wuld be ready for the 
March meeting, which Is to foe held 
in the home of iMr. and Mrs. Dan 
Roberts. Miss Emma Jane Miller 
gave a report on the rug fund, how- 
ever, quite a few .more dollars are 
needed. She was appointed chair- 
man of this committee. The class 
selected the type rug which they 
thought would >be more serviceable 
and urable. The class is to foe host 
to the District Methodist Men's Club 
on March 9th. Please make reserva- 
tions with Rev. G. W. Hoffman or 
Mrs. Andrew Penn, who is general 
chairman for the supper. Mrs. C. O. 
Carlisle is chairman of the dining 
roam. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Brown were 
presented a nice gift and many good 
wishes from the class. 

Residing In Washington 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ashlin Logan are 
now residing in Washington, D. C, 
where Mr. Logan Is special assistant 
to the Compensation Board of the 
Federal Security Agency. Mrs. Lo- 
gan was, before her marriage, Miss 
Mary Ella Bedinger, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. B. F. Bedinger of Riohwood 
Road, Walton. 

Mr. Logan, prior to entering the 
federal government service, was as- 
sociated with B. R. Jouett in the law 
firm of Jouett and Logan, Winches- 
ter, Ky. 

Visalia WMS to Meet 

ThYw. M. S. of the Visalia Baptist 
Church, will meet in the home of 
Mrs. Edith Ware on Thursday, March 
16 for the observance- of the annual 
Week of Prayer. 



Examination Scheduled 
To Fill Postmaster 
Position in Verona 



Has 3-Point Standing 

Stanley L. McElroy, son of Mrs. 
Hazel McElroy of Walton, and a stu- 
dent at the University of Kentucky, 
is one of 11 students in the U. K. 
College of Commerce to attain a per- 
fect three-point scholastic standing 
for the fall semester for the 1949-50 
academic year. 

Announcement of Mr. McElroy's 
stradght-A record was made by Dri 
Cecil C. Carpenter, dean of the Col- 
lege of Commerce. 

McElroy, a senior, was a member 
of Phi Eta Sigma honorary society 
during his freshman year, and is 
now a member of Beta Gamma Sig- 
ma, scholastic honorary society for 
commerce students. Ht is a gradu- 



The 



Sunday School Meeting at 
Walton Baptist Church 

Boone County Sunday Schools of 
the' Baptist Church will itim 1 ^ #it 
Walton Baptist Church, Monday 
evening, March 13 at 7:45. At (he 
last meeting there were 271 present; 
help us to make three hundred, Mon- 
day night. 

These meetings are proving to be 
a real blessing to the Sunday school 
work in all the churches. It is an 
hour when we come together in a 
great fellowship meeting with great 
singing by all present, as well as 
special music. This is all prepared 
by Joe Rouse, of Verona. There is 
always- a good inspirational mes- 
sage, 



Walton Wins 34th District Crown; 
Lose Regional Game to Newport 



YOUNG PHYSICIST 




Walton Homemakers to Meet 

The Walton Homemakers will hold 
their regular monthly meeting in the 
home of Mrs. John Wood, North Main 
Street. The lesson will be on "Pre- 
paring Food." The complete meal 
will be prepared there, so no covered 
dish is required, as is usually true. 



Joseph Messingschlager 

Kenton county has produced a 
young physicist, who is making note- 
worthy progress in the scientific 
world. He is Joseph Messingschlager, 



wro excells in Mathematics, Atomic 
Wonder who will take .that cup and Nucleur Physics at Villa Ma- 
home this time? Big Bone did it a- donna college, 
gain with 78 percent. What do you ' Young Messingschlager is the son 

Ser^Vm^thSTn tTepaXd ftlSFJ^lgSS^JS^ >"* Noe ' ^ Ma ^ ** *» 
1^5^-2!* ^™ ce «* .« * can go your way. I of the K M S JJ^ar? well-known ^J^£^*^L*™*!1 



Visalia Cooking School 

The Visalia P. T. A. will sponsor a 
cooking school on Monday evening, 
March 13, beginning at 8:00 p. m. 
i The public is cordially invited to at- 
Uend. The program will be enter- 
taining and instructive. Door prizes 
will be given. 

12- Year-Old Boone 

Child Needs Blood 

There is a child, 12 years old, in 
Boone county who needs blood. If 
you are able to help by donating a 
pint of blood for this child, please 
call Mrs. Elizabeth G. Nestor, Flor- 
ence 84, Boone County Red Cross. 

Union O. E. S. to Meet 

Union Chapter, 461, Order Eastern 
Star, will meet on Thursday, March 
9th in the Boone-Union Masonic Hall 
in Union, Ky. 

Initiation is scheduled- Mrs. Mary 



End Season With 
24 Wins, 4 Loses 



Commission has announced an ex- past, so may it be Monday night A e^£^$^Tcn^'w» -~f*£ side - A11 members of the Eastern 

rur?h at class t0 poSmai e er T^Ll ^TJ^T^ *Z* ^^ SSo^^SSST arS*"- Star ™ inVite * 

Verona, 'church in the county represented, in tral Kentucky for many years 



Ky. The examination will be held great numbers'— Pub Chin" 
at Walton. Receipt of applications ' 
will close on March 23, 1950. The 
salary is $2,079. 
The examination 



Sermon Topics Announced 
is open to ail .For Local Baptist Church 



Messingschlager graduated from 
Simon Kenton High School in 1946, 
receivdng the math award from this 
f*chool, under the excellent instruc- 
tion of Miss Alma Taylor. Joe is 



Old-fashioned Dinner 
Honors Baptist Pastor 
On 6th Anniversary 

Sunday, March 5th, marked the 



who are citizens of, or owe allegiance I Sermon topics at the Walton Bap- ., + A'ima lay 

o, the United States who reside with- tist Church for Sunday will be "The f undin « u ou } ' his sen or v «ar at col- 
dn the territory supplied by the post Miracles of Calvary," and "The JS? w i th , f S" weeks ?f Practice 
office for which this examination is, Fountain of Youth." Many ask to- '£ lg t h s £ ho ° 1 s I ud ^ nt teachln « at <*• 

announced and who are at least 21, day if miracles are still possible?; " ame Aca demy. 

years of age, but not yet 65, on the .Come and bear this subject discuss- _. ~ . . \7ZT~1 ~. 

date of the close of receipt of appH- ,ed. Everyone would like to find the ■ ° Celebrate 50th Anniversary completion of six successful years 

cations for, this examination. "Fountain of Youth." Many havel Mr. and Mrs. Carl Neumeister are wM:h Bev - B - C Garrett as. pastor of 

Application blanks and full infor- [spent years in looking for it. There to celebrate their 50th wedding an- tne Walton Baptist Church, 
matlon about the requirements of , is a fountain of youth to be found. ! niversary on Sunday, March 12th After the services Sunday, he and 
the examination may be secured i Would you like to find it? Ifrom 2:00 to 5:00 p. m., with an open hls wife were lnvit6d to the base " 

from the post office for which this Our Sunday school invites you to house reception at their home 2 ment of the ohurcn > where a boun- 
examination is announced, or from .study God's word, and our B. T. U.l miles South of Walton, on the Dixie ^QMS feast was spread. A long table 
the United States Civil Service Com- offers you an opportunity to train for Highway. the ful1 ten©** 1 of tne dining room, 

mission, Washington 25, D. C. Ap- 1 Christian service. We have a group! They are (the parents of Mrs Dan was laden wlth a11 kinds of good 
plications must be on fide with the for every age. The Sunday school at- j Roberts, Mrs. W. E Duchemin Joe food ' P re P ared :bv the ladies of the 
Commission in Washington, D.'C, on, tendance last Sunday was 281— the Neumeister and Charles Neumeister church and many other friends. ., 

goal was 310. They have eight grandchildren. The . R( ^ Ga "ett and bis wife and 

The ordinance of Baptism will be public Is invited family are well liked in Walton, and 



the date specified above. 

The date of examination will be 
stated on admission cards maided to 
applicants after the close of receipt 
of applications. 

Wa-Na Club to Meet 

The Wa-Na Club will meet Mon- 
day evening at 8 o'clock In the 
Phoenix Hotel, with Mrs. Clayton 
Renaker, hostess. 



administered at the conclusion of 
the evening service, Sunday. 

Lebanon Aid to Meet 

The Ladies Aid Society of the Leb- 
anon Presbyterian Church will meet 
today (March 9) at 11 a. m. in the 
home of Mrs. Donald Hopkins at 
Richwood. 



District Men's Meeting 

The District dinner meeting of the 
Methodist Men's Brotherhood will be 
held tonight (March 9) at the Wal- 
ton Methodist Church. One hundred 
fifty to 200 men are expected to be 
present. Dinner is to be served at 
6:30 p. <m. 



Walton-Verona Bearcats - 34th District Champions 




Front row (left to right) Dike Vest, Don Rice, Johnny Mctddox, Mike Ryan, and Maynard Meadows. 
Second row (left to right) Coach Hayes. Dennis Glacken, Tommy Johnson. Ronnie Cleek, and Layne 
Cheeseman.! Bob Hall, a member of the "first ten" was absent when the picture was taken: 



he has been a good pastor and will 
continue to be a good pastor. 

A purse of money was presented to 
he and his wife as a love gift from 
the church. 

Rev. and Mrs. Barnes and daugh- 
ter, and his brother and wife, of 
Latonia, also Rev. and Mrs. Hoff- 
man were among those present. 
"Our Pastor" 
Our Pastor has been with us six 

long years, 
He has shared our joys and also 

our tears; 
Have we been faithful as we 

ought to be? 
If we examine our hearts, I am 

sure we will see, 
We should give him our help and 

prayers, too — 
For let us remember, he is 

human, too. 
Let's try to do our- best in the years 
•that are ahead, 
Then when we each are called, 

we'll have nothing to dread. 

Masonic Meeting FrfrJay 

According to the Worthy Master, 
Eugene Sizemore, a call meeting of 
Walton Lodge, 719, F. & A. M. will 
be held Friday, March 10th at 7:30 
p. m. There will be work in the 
Fellowcraft degree, and all Master 
Masons are invited. 



Dayton and Dry Ridge, and after a 
stiff battle, Dayton was the winner 
37-35. Newport and Walton-Verona 
came together next, and what was 
expected to be "the game" of the 
tournament, turned out to be pretty 
much of a route of ibhe Bearcats. 
The Wildcats, led by Moeves, as- 
sumed a 17-12 adventage at the 
quarter and were never seriously 
threatened. At the intermission the 
Newporters were in front 36-21, and 
at the third quarter 49-37. In the 
closing period Newport outscored the 
losers 19-17, to win 68-54. 

Moeves led the Wildcats with 22 
points, while Sheanshang added 13 
and Knapp 15. Vest and Maddox 
scored 12 each fox the Bearcats, and 
Cleek-had 11. 



In many communities throughout 
the country the basketball season is 
over, and Walton-Verona can be in- 
cluded in this category. The Bear- 
cats were not extended too greatly 
in winning the 34th District crown, 
taking the finals last Saturday night 
from Erlanger Lloyd, but the Ninth" 
Regional tilt Tuesday night against 
Newport Public was a different story 
—but more of that later, the District 
comes first. ■ " 
The -District 

Last Wednesday night at Simon 
Kenton's gym, the W-V Bearcats 
lowered the boom on St. Henry, to 
win 60-31, being in front all the way. 
Dike Vest tallied 15 points for the 
winners, and Don Rice added 10, to 
lead all scorers. Coach Hayes used 
his entire squad in this victory. 

In the other opening- round game, 
at St. Henry, Burlington whopped 
Florence to the tune of 62-40. The 
score was tied at 20-20 at the half. 
McBee and Jim Ryle led the attack 
for the Eagles, with 16 points each, 
while Roland was best for the losers 
with 19 tallies. Markesbery added 
14 for the Knights. 

Thursday night's games saw the 
Simon Kenton Pioneers oust Hebron 
54-37, at Simon Kenton, and Erlanger 
Lloyd humble New Haven 83-30 at 
St. Henry's gym. 

The Pioneers received unexpected 
opposition from the Cards, leading 
at the half only 22-20. High point 
men for the winners were Henzman 
and Irvin, who divided 21 markers. 
Abdon was tops for Hebron with 8 
tallies. 

Erlanger used -it's entire squad in 
downing trte New Haven Tigers. 
The winners were on top all the way, 
the halftime score being 35-13. Five 
Juggernauts scored in double fig- 
ures, with Johnson being high with 
13, and Graham and Haven tallying 
11 each. Crume led the attack for 
New Haven with 13 points. 

The semi-finals on Friday night, 
brought about the defeat of Burl- 
ington at the hands of Erlanger, and 
the elimination of Simon Kenton 
by Walton. 

At St. Henry, the Lloyd Jugger- 
nauts were never in trouble as they 
raced to a 11-6 lead in the first per- 
iod and were never headed. The 
count at th ehalf was 27-17 in favor 
of Erlanger. Burlington came out 
after the intermission and outscored 
Lloyd 12-11, but the quarter ended 
with the winners leading 38-29. The 
Juggs poured in 20 points during 
the fourth ^period to win 58-39. Jones 
registered 20 points for Lloyd, to 
lead his team, and McBee rattled 
the nets for 25 markers in the cause 
of Burlington. 

At the Simon Kenton gym, the 
Pioneers battled the Bearcats, and 
for the third time this season, it was 
the Hayesmen. W.-V. took a 12-5 
lead in the first period and were 
never headed, being in front 22-15 
at the half; 37-27 at the close of the 
third period, and 50-33 as the game 
ended. Vest was top man for the 
winners with 17 points, followed 
closely by Layne Cheeseman, who 
registered 14. Gene Coppage had 
15 points for the Pioneers to be top 
man. ..,..-. 

The finals, Saturday night at the 
Simon Kenton hardwood, brought 
together the Lloyd Juggernauts and 
the Walton-Verona Bearcats. The 
game was close during the first 
half. Walton took a 2-point lead in 
the first quarter to lead 13-11 as the 
period ended. In the second frame 
each team tallied 15 points, for a 
halftime score of 28-26 in Walton's 
honor. The winners outscored their 
opponents 17-7, to lead at the close 
of the third quarter, 45-33. The 
final period was must like the third ° 
with the Cats again outscoring the 
Juggs, this .time 20-13, to* take the 
crown 65-46( Vest was again high 
for the winners with 20 .points. John 
Maddox had 18, Johnson 11, and 
Cheeseman 10. Haven was best for 
Lloyd with 13 markers and Jones 
was next with 10. 
The Regional 

The Ninth Regional tourney, com- 
posed of teams from Dayton, Dry 
Ridge, Newport, Walton, Williams- 
town, Erlanger, Covington, and Lud- 
low, got under way Tuesday night 
at the Newport gym. The first con- 
test of the meet brought together 



..../' 



Page Two 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, March 9, 1950 



WALTON 
ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 



Entered as Second Class Matter 

January 1, 1916 at the Post 

Office at Walton, Ky. 



Mark M. Meadows 
Editor and Owner 

MALCOLM SIMPSON 

Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 

S1.50 PER YEAR 
*, (In Advance) 



MEMBER 

KENTUCKY PRES! 
AS SOCIATION , 

"otCAUhlb lAHUAItilttt 



At least 25 electric sewing ma- 
chines were bought toy Montgomery 
county homemakers in January. 



[ FLORENCE NEWS 



Mrs. L. J. Thompson was called to' 
Springfield, Ohio, recently by the 
passing of her brother, Rev. Otis E. 
Watson, who had been ill two years. 

Mr. and tMfs. Paul Aylor were a- 
mong the guests in the home of a 
daughter, Mrs. Harold Rogers, and 
Mr. Rogers of Petersburg, Sunday. 
Guests from a distance were, an- 
other daughter, Mrs. Pauline Reed, 
her husband and son of Indianapolis, 
Ind., Mrs. Reed being honor guest, 
as she was celebrating a birthday. 

Mrs. Geneva Arnold and Mrs. Dor- 
othy Easton entertained with a 
shower Saturday evening at the 
home of the former, honoring Root. 
Reinhart and bride, who were mar- 
ried recently. 

Mrs. L. D. Daugherty of Devon, 
who has been very ill in a hospital, 
is improving, according to Jaite re- 
ports. 



. L J. METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST 

and 

OPTICIAN 

631 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 0535 

Office Hours . *• . 

9:00 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



J 



— new — 



S 



ame 

THEATER 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 



FRI. & SAT. 

Mark Stevens 
« 



MARCH 10-11 

Coleen Gray 



SAND" 



SUN. & MON. :: MARCH 12 - 13 

Spencer TRACY and 

Katharine HEPBURN— in * 

"ADAM'S RIB" 



Chas. Corbdn and wife of Coving 
ton were weekend guests of his mo 
ther here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Ndeberdlng have 
sold their home in Erlanger and de- 
parted for Hialeah, Fla., to make 
their home. 

"Miss Ruth Bristow, a student at 
U. K., spent the weekend with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Bristow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Sininger and 
family are now occupying their new 
home recently completed on Russell 
Street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Watson have 
moved to the Paul Aylor farm on 
Gunpowder Creek Road. 

Sympathy is extended the family 
of Thomas Marshall, who passed a- 
way recently. 

Me. and Mrs. Geo. Black are now 
residents of Beaver, having purchas- 
ed property there. 

Friends and relatives in the com- 
munity .of Mrs. Curtie Mannin ex- 
tend sympathy to her in the death 
of her husband, John Mannin. 

Robt. Reinhart of Price Road, and 
I Miss Betty Buckley, of New Rich- 
) mond, Ohio, were united in marriage 
i February 11 at Immanuel Reformed 
I Church, Bromley. (May they enjoy 
I health, happiness and prosperity as 
they go through life together. 

Weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Clyde Arnold were Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Bonta and son, their dau- 
ghter, Mrs. Moulder, and husband, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Edmonds of 
Latonia. ^ 



VERONA 



[ STAFFORDSBURG [ 



TUE. & WED. :: MARCH 14 - 15 

Ray Milland - Jean peters 
— in — 

"IT HAPPENS 

EVERY SPRING" 




THURSDAY :: MARCH 16 

Jimmy Lydon - Lois Bollier 



— in- 



•MISS MINK OF 1949" 



are 



We are glad to report that Mrs 
Lucille Webb was able to return to 
her home recently after spending 
several weeks in Booth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dawson returned re- 
cently from their two and one-half 
months stay in Arizona. We 
glad to see them back. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barnett enjoyed 
a surprise visit from their son, How- 
ard, who is attending school in In- 
diana. In the afternoon they re- 
turned, with their daughter, Mrs. 
Roy Martin and son, to her home in 
Lexington. They had spent .the past 
week here. Mr- and Mrs. Barnett 
returned Monday. 

—IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID?- 



This community sympathizes with 
Miss Anna Chapman and the family 
in the death of her sister Miss Mollie 
Chapman. 

Several from New Bethel went to 
Union to the Sunday school meeting 
and congratulated the church there 
on their nice, new building. 

The Verona Homemakers met re 
cently with Mrs. Stanley Fooks, to 
finish their . hat making project. 
Several hats were made and the olub 
was especially grateful ito Mrs. 
Fooks for entertaining the club for 
two days, and the aid she gave out 
of her vast knowledge and experi- 
ence on hat making. 

W. E. Waller and family joined 
with Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Vest and 
family on February 19 dn celebrat- 
ing Mr. Waller's and Mr. Vest's bir- 
thdays. Those enjoying the occas- 
ion at the Vest home, besides the 
Wallers and Vests, were Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Houston and Mrs. Marie Pen- 
nington. 

This community sympathizes with 
the family of Mr. Scott, who .passed 
away recently. 

Floria Adams and family have 
moved to the store building of Wal- 
ter Brown, and J. T. Glore and wife 
have moved to their side of the 
house vacated hy the Adams. 

The R. A.'s met at the ohurch re- 
cently, with several ahsetit because 
of sickness. The next meeting will 
be held March 15. All boys under 
15 are invited; 

Billy Mac Waller of Richmond, 
spent a recent weekend with his 
.jirente, Mr/ and Mrs. W. E. Waller, 
and Marion Arch, and attended the 
birthday celebration at the home of 
j his uncle, H. L. Vest. 

Those at the W. E. Waller home 
on February 26 to celebrate Mrs? 
Waller's birthday, were Mr. and Mrs 
Marvin Waller and Mr. and Mrs..Earl 
Jones of Criftenden, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry. Waller of Lexington, and 
Lizzie Noel of Verona. 




We have a car of American Wire Fence . . . priced to 
sell immediately ... we must get rid of this fence . . . 
come in and see us! 



FERTILIZER 

The best Agrico ... for Tobacco and Corn . . . 
for Immediate Delivery! 

Also Full Line of 

Ubiko Feed - Seed 

Straw and Hay 

Allen's Coal & Feed 

(FORMERLY WALTON & READNOUS) 

Phone 154 * Walton, Ky. 




When The Crash 

Comes - Be 

Protected 

PuMP^utomobih 
P~^&{utual Insurance 
^r Company 

J. B. JOHNSON 

AGENT 
PHONE 112 WALTON. KY. 



ft. 



w. & w. 

Electrical Contractors 

WIRING 

Of All Kinds — Guaranteed! 

w. w. Ryu p hone 26J 

W. W. Green walton 



| DIAMOND 
VALUE . . . 



Because their beauty 
and value remain un- 
changed, diamonds are 
universally regarded 
as the supreme ex- 
pression of love and 
admiration. 

Come to Match's for 
diamonds of carefully 
selected quality and 
priced in strict con- 
formity with value. 

Our 90 years' experi- 
ence in this one loca- 
tion is your assurance 
of getting dollar for 
dollar value, in your 
purchase. 

Weekly or 
Monthly Payments! 



MOTCH 

Jeweler and Optician 

—Since 1857— 

613 Madison Avenue 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

NEW SHIPMENTS! 

TOBACCO CANVAS, 32x28, 9 ft. wide, 100 ft. 

long, metal eyelets— NOW $9.75 

TOBACCO CANVAS, 32j<28, 12 ft. wide, 100 ft. 

long, metal eyelets— NOW ..,_ $12.75 



Adam Hats — latest for Spring, fur felt _ 



$5.00 



Ladies' Polo Shirts, asst. styles and colors .....":. ,„„ 98c 

Plastic Drapes, solid colors Now $1.00 

(Also Complete Line of Kitchen and Ruffled Curtains) 

Reg. 98c "Bates" Prints, new shipment, now, yd. 59c 
Reg. 1.19 Gabardine, rayon & cotton,, 42" wide, yd. 89c 

Children's & Girls' Spring Coats ..; Now $6.75 up 

New Shipment Boys' Gabardine Pants Now $3.98 

— Other New Shipments Arriving Daily — 

You get more quality for your money when 
you buy "STAR BRAND," "POLL PARROTT" 
and "ENDICOTT JOHNSON" shoes. We sell 
better shoes at lower prices. Compare the 
quality and price of our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. P. F. Gym Shoes. 

■ —WE FIT BY X-RAY— 

Morris Dept. Store 

The House of Quality" — Tour Money's Worth 01 Money Back 

ERLANGER -:. KENTUCKY 




tikoose four 7?#cfbr 







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fARMAU.- FIRST IN THE I ICI-D 

BUTLER BROS. 

Phone Ind. 5053 Nicholson, Ky. 





-The 

JOHN DEERE 

Model "MC" 

Come what may— light, loose foils; 
wet, soggy fields; rough terrain; or 
extreme hillsides— the extra stability, 
flotation, and sure-footed traction of 
the John Deere Model "MC" make it 
the boss on every job. Light tractor 
economy, convenient controls, roomy 
platform, air-cushion seat, and other 
outstanding features are yours in the 
"MC," the little giant of the track, 
types. See us for details ... soon. 



JOHN DEERE 2 Cylinder TRACTORS 



Yours in • 

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Whether you farm large, medium, 
or small acreages, it will pay you to 
investigate the advantages of owning a 
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I 



It's jam-packed with extra value 
such outstanding features as Dual 
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operation. 

Get all the facts about the "MT." 
Come in soon. 



The Jansen Hardware Co. 



110 PIKE STREET 



COVINGTON, KY. 



I 



Thursday, March 9, 1950, 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, ^Kentucky 



Page Three 




WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. B. C. Garrett, Pastor 

Bryan Rector, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship r 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Warship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Frank Penlck, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

WALTON METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. G. W. Hoffman, Pastor 
Dan Roberts, Supt. 

Sunday Serfttol 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Youth Fellowship 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. __ 7:30 p. m. 

. ST. PATRICK CHURCH. VERONA 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a. m. 
2nd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

3rd Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
5th Sunday of month ___ 8:30 a. m. 

XLL SAINTS MISSION, WALTON 

Rev. Henry A. Busemeyer, Pastor 
1st Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 
2nd Supday of month ___ 8:30 a. m. 
3rd Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

4th Sunday of month 8:30 a. m. 

5th Sunday of month __ 10:00 a. m. 

KENTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Frank Lipscomb, Pastor 
Walter W. Roden, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

Cottage Prayer Meet., Fri. 8:00 p. m. 

— Services Every Sunday — 

INDEPENDENCE CHRISTIAN CH. 

Rev. Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed 8:00 p. m. 

NEW BANK LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 
S. Webster, Pastor 
• Harold Callen, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. :.__ 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 8:00 p. m. 

Bible Study Wed. 8:00 p. m. 

CRITTENDEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Walter Kidwell, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays) 

CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

Pastor — Vernor F. Lipscomb, Jr. 
S. S. Supt. — Harvey Hughes 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a.m. 

Evening Worship _ 8:00 p. m 



PAINT LICK BAPTIST CHURCH 

G. Jackson Stafford, Pastor 
J. E. Peny, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Worship Service 11:00 a. m, 

Evening Service 7:30 p. m, 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 



GOSHEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Jack Daniels, Pastor 
Carl H. Justice, Supt 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Service 8:00 p. m. 

(First and Third Sundays) 



FLORENCE METHODIST CHURCH 

Rev. O. W. Robinson, Pastor 
Carroll Washburn, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 

Young People 7:00 p. m. 

Evening Services 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting Wed. ___ 7:30 p. m 



GLENCOE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

J. B. VanHorn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m, 

Morning W ors hip 11:00 a. m. 

Christian Endeavor 6:30 p. m. 

Filing Worship 7:30 p. am, 




J^JOJ^Jt-^ 



International Uniform 
UUJPT l Sunday School Lbwi H i 



KENNETH J. rOREiJUK^ 

SCRIPTURE: Acts 6:1-0; 20:17—31:6; 
Cor' ' 
DEI 
13:3-6 



I Corinthian* 12: I Timothy 3. 
DEVOTIONAL READING: Roman! 



Church Leadership 



ii Lesson for March 12, 1950. 



1 



SOUTH FORK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Joe Johnson, Pastor- - 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Service 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Services 7:00 p. on. 

Young People's Meeting _ 6:15 p. m. 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN CH. 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 

Worship Service , 11:30 a. m. 



LEBANON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

On Verona-Crittenden Pike 

Rev. Don Hopkins, Pastor 

Worship Service 3:00 p. m. 



BEAVER LICK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

Rev. Grayson Ensign, Pastor 

Preaching Services 2:00 p. m. 

(Every 4th Sunday) 



VISALIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Bob Brown, Pastor 
Willard Anderson, Supt. 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Services 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:30 p. m. 

Evening Services — ___ 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Meeting, Wed. — 7:30 p. m. 



RHEUMATISM 
NERVOUSNESS 
HEADACHE 
BACKACHE 
SINUSITIS 

Dr. Thomas Sullivan 

CHIROPRACTOR 
1038 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

— HEmlock 7980— 
Hours: 1-4 and 7-8 X-Ray 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

COVINGTON -:- KENTUCKY 



♦ 



DEPOSITS INSURED UNDER THE FEDERAL 
DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 




If YOU ARE INTERESTED in investing funds 
you will be pleased with, what we have to 
offer. We are proud of our experience, repu- 
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Choose the Federal Plan where funds ore 

permanently Insured against loss and 

Supervised by the U. S. Government 



FIRST FEDERAL loan assn. 

501-503 MAIN ST. - HE 6480 - COVINGTON, KY. 




NEW BETHEL BAPTIST, VERONA 

Rev. R. F. DeMolsey, Pastor 
Joe Rouse, Supt. 

Sunday School i 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wed. 7:30 p. m. 

—Services Every Sunday — 



WILMINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

Grover F. Tyrter, Jr., Pastor 
Fred McMillian, Supt. 

Sunday School __! 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Mid -Week Service, Fri. _ 8:30 p. m. 



"HVHAT'S in a name?" Different 
" churches have many different 
names for the persons who hold of- 
fice in them. But whatever quarrels 
the churches have had, few of them 
are about these names. The thing 
is more Important than the name. 
All of us agree that churches do 
need organization m^r^amm* — s 

Some people 
would have us go 
back ,o the New 
Testament for our 
pattern of organi- 
zation. We cannot 
quite do this, for 
one important rea- 
son. Where in the 
New Testament _ 
would you dig in? Dr Foreman 
Would you take the letters to 
Timothy and Titus as your guide? 
There you find bishops (overseers, 
superintendents) mentioned, also 
elders and deacons; trm- y^scr <Sttr*&s* 
find their duties laid down. 

Go back into the story of Acts 
and you will find a place where 
elders are first mentioned in the 
Christian chu»ch (11:30); go still 
farther back and you come to the 
first election of deacons (Acts 6). 
In your first Utopian Church, 
will you model it after the 
three-officer plan, or two, or 
one, or (going back before 
Acts fi) none at all? (Apostles, 
of course, are not now avail- 
able, 

Scholars in most churches today 
are pretty well agreed that what 
we have in the New Testament is 
not a rigid pattern of organization, 
but rather certain principles on 
which any successful church must 
be built. Let us see what some of 

these are. 

• • * 

The Job and the Man 

KLL CHURCHES are agreed on 
** one point: A church must 
have leadership. What is every- 
body's business is nobody's busi- 
ness. Some one must draw up 
plans, think ahead. No organiza- 
tion in the world is self-starting 
and self-operating, not even the 
church of Christ. The early church 
knew this. But they elected officers 
only as the need for them arose. 
In Jerusalem there was not a dea- 
con in the place until that emer- 
gency came up in the matter oi 
relief. 

In St. Paul's first missionary 
church (Acts 13, 14) he did not 
get the elders first, and then 
find churches for them. On the 
contrary, he founded the 
churches first and then ap- 
pointed elders for them. 
It would be a good idea for a 
church today to take stock of its 
officers once in a while. Are they 
necessary? For example, do you 
elect a deacon to "take the place" 
of one who has moved away, or do 
you elect a deacon to do a job that 

can't otherwise be done? 

• * * 

Sweetness No Substitute 
For Skill 

NOT ALL CHRISTIANS are qual- 
ified to hold office in the 
church, and very few, if any, 
would be equally good in any office. 
A Sunday school superintendent, 
for example, might make a poor 
showing at a prayer-meeting talk. 
A man who can conduct a success- 
ful financial campaign and keep 
the church up to a high level of 
generosity the year round, may not 
be just the man to plan the educa- 
tional program. A lovely sweet 
lady might turn out to be a stupid 
Madam Chairman. 

Paul knew all this and in 
faet insisted on it. Each sep- 
arate kind of job In the church 
calls for distinct qualifica- 
tions. 
-Just being a good Christian was 
never enough to Insure a man's 
(or a woman's) being a good of- 
ficer. 

Personality 

HFTER AT J ■, however, personal 
** character means more than 
technical skill. A man may have 
such flaws in his character that 
his influence does more harm than 
good, so that even if he is an ac- 
complished musician you still 
would not want him as "Minister 
of Music." or even as choir-leader. 
A man whose own home to 
always at sizes and sevens (as 
Paul pointed out) is a poor candi- 
date for any executive post In 
the church. A man who can't 
keep from quarreling in every- 
day life to no man to entrust 
with responsibility in the 
church. 

A man of good character can, and 
will want to, learn the skills his 
job calls for; but a man of sleazy 
character just does not care. Be 
careful of the sorj of man you 
elect to office, in church or out; 
for the rank and file are not going 
to rise above their leaders. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
W. E. Maners, Pastor 

Sunday School 1 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. i 7:00 p. m. 

Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer-Bible Study Wed. _ 7:30 p. m. 



STAFFORDSBURfli CHURCH 
Rev. John Wheary, Pastor 

Sabbath School __"_ 10:00 a. m. 

Paul Damon, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:45 p. m. 




• ♦:♦—♦:♦— 




SERVICE 
ANYWHERE IN AMERICAI 

Through out nation-wide connection!, we have the faculties lor handling a 
funeral from any point in America. fa 

We offar our tarvleai with pride blowing that wa can relieve the famlty of 
el burdens incident to any death away from home. 

CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 

FUNERAL HOMES 




UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Rev. D. R. Hopkins, Pastor 

Grace Grader, Supt. 

Sunday School 9:30 

Worship Service 10:30 



m. 
m, 



Walton, Ky. 
Phone 352 



About a fourth of Bath county 
farm families have butchering done 
at frozen food locker plants. 

Seventy-five Sheep worth $809 
were killed by dogs in Boyle county 
in 1949. 



Florence, Ky. 
Phone 193 



Homemakers in Webster county 
wired 130 kerosene lamps for elec- 
tricity in one month. 

Tobacco checks cleared through 
the bank in Jackson, Breathitt co- 
unty, totalled around $360,000. 



OAK ISLAND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Robert Browning, Pastor 
C. C. Northcutt, S. S. Supt. 

■JJhfifcy.&hool ->- W .. 

Worship, 1st & 3rd Sun. _ 11:00 a. m. , 

Training Union r 7:00 p. m.| I 

Worship 8:00 p. m.j j 

More registered beef cattle were j 
purchased and brought into Mar- 
shall county in the past two months j j 
than in any previous year. • 




For A Rainy Day! 



Establish the habit of regular 
saving. Open a savings ac- 
count with us now by deposit- 
ing as>little as $1.00! - ■ 

Personal and Business Loans I 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

WALTON. KY. 



ONE GREATHOURof SHARING 




k^t_MttM| 




These are days of many and serious world pioblema. 
which America cannot ignore. Cold war. strikes, revolution. 
Conflict are the phrase* that make) today's headlines. 

Numerous ara the theories advanced for solving these 
problems. Statesmen, economists, and diplomats have tried 
and failed to achieve their goal oi world peace. 

But there is another fore* at work that promises 
greater success. This is the- power of love, fellowship, 
and understanding — and it takes its banner under the 
name of Christianity. 

On Sunday, March 12. Christians the nation over will 
gather together to pool their wealth, talents, and faith in 
ONE GREAT HOUR OF SHARING. Only through such 
united efforts as this can the world come to know the peace 
that it desires. 

Com* to Church this Sunday morning and share with 
Others the peace and security that you know will come from 
Christian living and Christian faith. 



The Church For All . . . 
All For The Church 

The Church is the areata* 
factor oa earth for the building oi 
character and good citizenship. 
It is a storehouse oi ■piritual values. 
Without a strong Church, neither 
democracy nor civilisation eaa 
survive. There are lour eound 
reasons why every person should 
attend aervicea regularly and 
support the Chnrch. They are: 
(1) For hie own aake. (2) For hie 
children's sake. (3) For the sake 
oi his community and nation. (4) 
For the aake oi the Church itself, 
which needs his moral and material 
support. Plan to go to church 
regularly and read your Bible daily. 



Sunday.... Matthew 8 38-42 

Monday-. ■Matthew 14 16-81 

Tuesday.... Matthew 18 18-22 

Wedneed'y Mask 8 1-8 

Thursday... Luke 12 28-34 

Friday Acts 2 43-47 

Seturday...Acts 4 32-38 






Linton's Barber Shop 

Walton, Kentucky 

Florence Deposit Bank 

Florence, Kentucky 

Hamilton and Jones 

Walton, Kentucky 

Consolidated Telephone Co. 

Florence, Kentucky 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 
Phone Walton 95 



Copyright I960, t.lslll Adv. Service, SUsebnig. Vs. 

Conrad Hardware 

For Service, Large or Small — See Powers I 

Dixie State Bank 

/ Walton, Kentucky 

Meador's Grocery 

Home of Fine Foods. Vegetables, Meats 

Roberts Grocery 

Where You Get Quality and Price 

Community Public Service Co., Inc. 
Walton, Kentucky 



."<*■ 



/ 



fc 



Page Four 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, March 9, 1950 





OIL AND ELECTRIC BROODERS 
WATER FOUNTAINS - FEEDERS 
POULTRY UTTER - REMEDIES 

TUXEDO FEEDS 

Garden Seed - Fertilizer 



LANG'S 

Feed & Seed 

512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. HE 9168 



Sheriff's Sale 

By virtue of Judgment and Order 
of Sale directed to me, which issued 
from the Office of the Judge of the 
Boone Quarterly Court, in favor of 
Colonial Finance Co., in the case of 
Colonial Finance Co., a corporation, 
Plaintiff, against Lawrence Vest and 



EXTERIOR & INTERIOR 

PAINTING 

Paper Hanging 

Also Steaming Off Wallpaper 

LUKE BROS. 

Phone: JUniper 4084 
or Independence 6329 



Emma Vest, Defendants, I, or one of 
my Deputies, will on Friday, the 17th 
day of March, 1950, between the 
hours of 1:00 o'clock P. M., and 2:00 
o'clock P. M., at Home of Lawrence 
Vest, Walton, Boone County, Ken- 
tucky, expose, to public sale, to the 
highest bidder, the following de- 
scribed property, to-wit: 

1 cream Kitchen Cabinet; 4 Maple 
Kitchen Chairs; 1 Frigidaire; 1 Boss 
Kerosene Range; 1 Round Maple 
Table; 3 Metal Beds; 1 Baby Walnut 
Bed; 1 Walnut Rocker; 1 Walnut 
Dresser; 1 painted blue Dresser; 1 
straight back Walnut Chair; 1 wine 
Davenport; 1 Bridge Lamp; 2 End 
Tables, Walnut; 2 Walnut Rockers; 
1 9'xl2' Rug; 1 Estate Heatrola; 1 
Davenette, black leather; 1 Philco 
Radio. 

The amount of the Judgment is 
$119.98, plus interest and costs. 

Terms: Cash Sale. 

This 27th day of February, 1950. 

W. H. EASTON, 

3t-9 » Sheriff Boone County, Ky. 




Try 



Our 



"WANT ADS" for Results! 



EXPERT 
WASHER 
REPAIR 

Any Make 

Parts for All 
Popular Makes 

Just Give Us A Call 
DIXIE 7113 




JEST 
JESTIN 



Just Wanted To Know 



HAGEDORN'S 



856 Dixie Highway 



Erlanger, Kentucky 



Hamilton & Jones 



Invites You to Shop! 



Inlaid Linoleum 

"MANY NEW PATTERNS" 
-LOWEST PRICES 



9x12 Rugs - Linoleum by the Yard 

CALL WALTON 99— FOR FREE ESTIMATE 



A rather smallish man was 
hailed into court charged with 
picking a man's pocket. The com- 
plainant was very near-sighted and 
didn't seem very sure of his facts. 
He couldn't positively identify the 
other man as the one who stole his 
watch. 

The. *'«*«f « — *> jjMfa th* -lack 
bl eviaerice, was 'forced to dis- 
charge the alleged pickpocket. 
When the man stood there, as if 
he didn't comprehend the meaning 
of the justice's words, the judge 
repeated the words which dis- 
missed him. 

"All right," he said, "you're free 
to go. You may leave. You are 
judged not guilty. Go on." 

The man still wasn't sure. "Does 
that mean," he asked, "that I can 
keep the watch?" 



Gr-rr! 




Beechgrove Homemakers 

Mrs. Joe Kunkle, Sr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Schadler were hostesses to the 
Beechgrove Homemakers Club for 
the February meeting, held in the 
home of Mrs. Kunkle on Turkey Foot 
Road. Mrs. William P. Meyers con- 
ducted the business session. Mem- 
bers answered roll call by naming 
their favorite flower. A detailed .re- 
port on Farm and Home Week was 
given toy Mrs. Bryan Armstrong. 
Bach member read an interesting 
fact about Kentucky. Mrs. Joe 
Brunck gave a lesson in basket 
weaving. Mrs. Wm. Endres display- 
ed papers and documents over 100 
years old, among wihich were the 
IBotanico Medical Recorder, printed 
in Cincinnati, Aug. 26, 1848; a pam- 
phlet of the Annual Fair staged on 
the Covtngton and Lexington Turn- 
pike in 1837. These papers and doc- 
uments were found in a secret hid- 
ing place of the old home of the 
Endres, before tearing it down. 

Member Jffcsent were Mrs. Br^ 
Armstrong, Mrs. Joe Brunck, Mrs. H.- 
L. Clark, Mrs. W. M. Clinkenbeard, 
Mis. Wm. Endres, Mrs. Joe Kunkle, 
Sr., Mrs. Joe Kunkle, Jr., Mrs. Wm 
P. Meyer, Mrs. C. McFarland, Mrs. F. 
M. Powers, Mrs. R. Robinson and 
Mrs. Gus Schadler. 







./- m I 



Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



THE BEST PLACE 

EAT 

IN COVINGTON 

Lang's Cafeteria 

623-625 Madison Ave. 






7%r?M/iu cua 



iM«**e^ 






FARMAtt-TlMe-PROVEP FOR IMPROVED FARMING- 

Butler Bros. 

Phone Ind. 5053 Nicholson, Ky. 




Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 




GENERAL 



TRUCKING 



Dentist's wife— "Have you been 
able to collect that bill Mr. Jones 
has owed you for so long?" 

Dentist— "No, darn it. I met the 
guy on the**street yesterday and he 
had the nerve to snap at me with 
the teeth I made for him." 



We Haul . . . Cinders, Gravel and Stone for Driveways 
and Roads; also Concrete, Gravel and Sand. 

Joe Kennedy 

PHONE: WALTON 18 or IND. 6495 

: DAY or NIGHT: 




l - MASTER MIX 

f/) COMPLETE 

Crrrtja' CONCENTRATES 

STRAIGHT FEED., 



Bring In 250 lbs. Corn and Mix with 10Q lbs. Master 
Mix Sow and Pig Concentrate, which makes you an 
18% Pig Starter at a low cost of only $3.15 per 100 lbs. 



First Choice 

A prospective father had become 
so keyed up with the waiting that 
he staged a premature celebration. 
He managed to break away from 
his drinking companions soon after 
midnight and headed for home. He 
was helped through the door by the 
nurse. 

"Is my son here yet?" he de- 
manded, and without waiting for 
a reply, continued, "Oh, he must 
be. Show him to me, will you, 
please?" 

The nurse, without a word, 
pulled back some covers and re- 
vealed triplets. He blinked his eyes 
several times, counted them again 
to make sure it wasn't the alcohol 
multiplying for him, then seemed 
to brighten all of a sudden. 

"I'll keep the one in the middle," 
he announced. 



AUCTION 




WALTON, KY. 



PHONE '57 



i 



DR. PAUL J. 

TABELING 

—OPTOMETRIST— 

5 W. Pike St., Covington 
HEmlock 0700 

Successor To 
Dr. Jos. B. Schnippering 



Being unable to secure the proper help to continue the dairy business, I will sell 
at Public Auction my entire dairy herd, equipment and beef cattle at my farm — 
2 MILES WEST of FLORENCE, KY., on the Burlington Road, U. S. 18, on 

Sat., March 1 1 



12:30 
P.M. 



For the Best In Heating 



J anata Heating Service 

-y . • iWflJUTON ... 524 
Engineered Heating— CoaL Oil, 

Gas Furnaces and Stokers. 
Heating & Plumbing Supplies 



12 HEAD DAIRY CATTLE— 2 6-year-old Holstein cows with calves by side; 
8-year-old registered Holstein cow with calf by side; 6-year-old registered Jersey 
cow with calf by side; 4-year-old Jersey cow, giving good flow of milk; 5-year-old 
Holstein cow, giving good flow of milk ; 6-year-old Holstein cow, giving good flow 
of milk ; 6-year-old Holstein cow, close springer ; Guernsey heifer, close springer ; 
3-year-old registered Holstein bull; 1 8-months-old purebred Holstein bull; Jersey 
bull, 10 months oldl, purebred. This herd has recently been T. B. and Bangs tested 
and is an exceptionally good dairy herd. 

10 HEAD BEEF CATTLE— 3-year-old Hereford cow; 3-yr.-old Shorthorn cow ; 
Hereford heifer, springer; Shorthorn heifer, yearling; 2 Whiteface heifers, yearlings; 
Hereford heifer; Red heifer, yearling; 1 4-months-old Hereford bull; 5-months-old 
Hereford bull. 

DAIRY EQUIPMENT— DeLaval milking machine with 2 units; Esco 4-can milk 
cooler; 7 ten-gallon milk cans. This equipment is practically new. 

: TERMS CASH : 



James R. Rice 

- . S m 

Tanner Bros., Auctioneers 

Chas. M. Tanner, Florence — Phone 728 David L. Tanner, Walton — Phone 155 



.wv 



^■™™ 



Thursday, March 9, 1 950 



SPARTA R. 2 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Page Five 




Euel Snell has moved to Owen co- 
unty; Charles Beaoh moved to the 
farm he purchased from Mr. Snell; 
Mono Lillard to the farm he purch- 
ased from Alfred Kemper; Howard 
Beaoh to the Phil Stallard farm; 
Perl Beach to the Paul Carver fawn; 



Elmer Henderson to the Hobart Eas- 
ton farm; Ralph Boots to the Elf nie 
Henderson farm; Henry Gross to the 
Manuel Richardson farm, and Fayne 
Boaz to his farm vacated by Mr. 
Gross. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boots called on their 
son, Ralph Boots, and family Sunday 
evening. 

Elmer Henderson and children 
called on his 'parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Elfrie Henderson, Sunday afternoon. 



...V. 



GRfiNT 

WILLIAMS TOWN (O 



MS 2020 



SATURDAY ONLY :: MARCH 11 

2 ACTION HITS 2 

hit no. 1 

Allan "Rocky" Lane — dn 

"BANDIT KING OF TEXAS" 

hit no. 2 

Johnny Sheffield— in 

"BOMBA ON PANTHER ISLAND" 



2 DAYS . . . STARTING SUNDAY 

HIGH ADVENTURE ON THE HIGH SEAS 

^•am MMni 



John Payne * Gall Russell 
Jeffrey Lynn * Lon Chaney in 
Edgar Bergen * Michael O'Shea 



CAPTAIN 
CHINA 



TUE. <S WED. :: MARCH 14-15 



JciA Wkm, 

8AUH0LDEN 



$yiiss (;i?vvr 
KICIfMOiVP 



mm 1 

LDEN 



THUR. & FRI. :: MARCH 16-17 

2 BIG HITS 2 

—Hit No. 1— 

Paul HenreTd - Joan Bennett in 

'THE SCAR" 

; ~* —Hit N" . *Jrr • 
Jungle Thrills" In Color 
.<- "SAVAGE SPLENDOR" 



Excellent Boone County Farm 

74 ACRES, rich, clean land; No. 1 fence throughout; well watered, 
3 ponds, spring and 2 cisterns; 10 acres alfalfa, rest in grass, ex- 
cept 6 acres, but was cultivated last year; every inch of this farm, 
can be cultivated with a tractor; tobacco base; also 8-roora mod- 
ern home, full basement, built-in garage, furnace, bath, hot and 
cold water; combination barn. 8 cow stanchions; stripping room; 
corn crib; meat house; chicken house; brooder house. This farm 
is located on a good road, in the heart of Boone county. Shown 
by appointment only. 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SPECIAL 

61 ACRES, good rolling land, well watered, all in grass except what 
was cultivated in 1949; 1-acre tobacco base; good fence; some 
timber; 3 houses, one good 4-room house, one 3-room modern 
house with basement, built-in garage, and one 2-room house; 
god combination barn, and outbuildings. All goes for $7,500. 

FLORENCE — On Burlington Pike, 1 Vz miles from Florence; 5-room 
modern home, hardwood flors, oil-fired furnace, modern bath, 
2-car garage; iy« acres land; first time offered; possession with 
deed.| A real buy — $10400. 

WALTON — Six-room modern home, stoker-fired furnace; well lo- 
cated; lot 50x140; $7,500. 

i 

WALTON — Beautiful building lot for ranch -type, home, 100x800-' 
only $1,500. 

ERLANGER — If you like large rooms, don't fail to see this modern 
4-room home with unfinished second; marble sills, steel win- 
dows, Venetian blinds; lot 100x125— a good buy. 

Moss & Gillispie 

Real Estate Brokers 
PHONE: DIXIE 8175 or ERLANGER 6704W— Day or Night 




KJTASJ this new bathroom beauty treatment now! Install 
quality plumbing fixtures by American-Standard for the luting beauty, 
luxury and convenience that »uure» lifetime satisfaction. The Rozbury 
Lavatory with its wide ledges ... the corner model Nee-Angle Bath 
made of rigid cast iron with a heavy coating of acid-resisting enamel, 
comfortable, spacious, safe . . the quiet genuine vitreous china Master 
Onc-Plece Water Qoiet ... the unique Madena Dental Lavatory for 
extra convenience ... all with sparkling Ch r omard fittings . . an 
.Bad* in lustrous white and a wide variety of exquisite -colors. 

STOP in now. Ltt as show you these products and the other quality 
units in the complete line of American-Standard Heating Equipment 
and Plumbing Fixtures. Easy time payment plan for modernlaation, II 

you desire. 

GnmAs. . . w uMftr fill imftrmstim 

A. & M. SUPPLY CO. 

106 East Fourth Street Covington, Ky. 

Phone — JUniper 3500 . 



Floyd Peak is on the sick list. We 
hope for his speedy recovery. 

Ralph Boots and Sonny attended 
Church at Glencoe, Sunday morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cain were callers in 
this community Friday. , 

If all reports are true, wedding 
bells wdlil soon be ringing here. 

(Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Swango at- 
tended the funeral of W. W. Scott on 
Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Billy Crouch* and 
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. William 
Hemingway and daughter spent the 
weekend with their parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edgar Hemingway. 

CARD OF THANKS 

We take this means to thank our 
dear friends and neighbors for their 
kindness to us in the illness and 
death of our beloved husband and 
father, Thomas W. Marshall. 

Mrs. Stella A. Marshall, 
Ellen Marshall Kosebrook, 
Charles J. Rosebrook. 
lt-10 

About 75 homemakers in 'Boyd co- 
unty plan to make tailored coats or 
suits this spring, having had special 
lessons in tailoring. 

Muhlenberg county has 18 4-H 
clubs with a total enrollment of 564 
boys and gdrls. 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

•All persons having claims against 
the estate of Thomas W. Marshall, 
deceased, please present same, prov- 
en according to law; all persons in- 
debted to said estate are requested 
(to settle at once with the under- 
signed. 

Mrs. Stella A. Marshall, Admr. 
2t-10 

DAIRYING IN STATE 
SECOND TO TOBACCO 

Dairying provides about a fifth of 
the farm income in Kentucky and 
ranks second only to tobacco, accord-, 
ing to a new circular called "Feed- 
ing Dairy Cows," published by the 
College of Agriculture and Home 
Economics, University of Kentucky. 

The number of dairy cows in Ken- 
tucky could profitably be increased 
in step with the expansion in the 
production of pasture and hay, it is 
stated. Dr. D. M. Seath, head of the 
college's dadry section, is the author 
of the circular. 

The publication deals with every- 
think about feeding, which is the 
most important part of dairying. 
Copies may be had at county agent 
offices or by writing to the college at 
Lexington. 

Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



Artistic Beauty Salon 

REOPENS TODAY 

(Thursday, March 9th) 

The shop has been clased due to .illness 
of the manager, Miss Mary R. Yealey, 
but is now open for business. 

Phone Walton 144 For Appointment 



<.,_ < M 



SEE 



EED FAMILY FINANCE 



MONEY? 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 




ADVERTISED SHOES 

First-Steps ^ *jg& 

WORK SHOES , PLAY SANDALS - GYM SHOES 

Open Saturday Until 9 p. m. - Week Days, 9 a. m. to 6:15 p. m. 

Henry's Bootery 

- "SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY" 

Next to Kroger Super Market Erlanger, Ky. 






Diesels for 




Dixie! 



Diesel locomotives . . . like dollars . . . don't grow on 
trees. Those 603 powerful Diesel units*the Southern 
Railway System now has in service and on order 
cost about $80 million! 

That's a lot of money. But it bought a lo: of 
modern horsepower. . .to give a modern fast-growing 
Dixieland the best in transportation service. 

These "Diesels fdr Dixie" are just one indication 
of our determination to keep pace with the increas- 
ing transportation needs of the South. , 

To do that takes a lot of money. And it takes 
FAITH. Faith in the bright future of Dixie. Faith 
that some day soon our country will insist, in the 
public interest, that all form9 of commercial inter- 
city transportation must stand independently on their 
own financial feet . . . without support from the fax- 
payer ... as only the railroads now do. 

President 







SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 



Page Six 



WALTON - ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



•»&..» 



Social Security Representative 
At Erlanger and Williamstown 

On March 16, 1950, Edward J. Bolte, 
Field Representative of tihe Social 
Security Administration will be at 
ithe Erlanger Post Office from 10 a. 
.an. to 11 a. m. and at the Williams- 
town Post Of flee from 2 p. m. to 3 p. 
im. All persons Interested in fflhe Old - 
Age and Survivors Insurance pro- 
gram, or applicants for soolal secur- 
ity cards should consult this repre- 
sentative. Each worker upon (reach- 



ing age €5 should call at the nearest 
office of the Social Security Admin- 
istration to determine his status un- 
der this program. When a worker 
dies Ms survivors should get 8n 
touch with the social security office 
for assistance in filing claim fox 
death benefits. \ 

More than 100 soil samples for 
testing were brought to the Breckin- 
ridge county soils laboratory the 
first week it was dn operation. 



AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

fOR CHICKS THAT PAY... 
SOUND YOUR " 




Buy Pullorum Clean 

chicks 

TODAY 



A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

CMCKJPA 

A aukey'sco. A 

A mo MIU.8 J\ 

'aaaaaaaA, 



—ADDITIONAL— 

Want Ads 



FOR SALE— Case pickup baler, 4- 
cylinder Wiscnosin air colled mo- 
te, in A-l shape. Phone Burling- 
ton 79 or 481X. 2t-9* 



FOR RENT— TThree-room apartment 
with bath. Phone Walton 524. 

tf-10 



— U. S. Certified Pullorum Clean— 

MENEFEE HATCHERY: 



CRITTENDEN, KY 




PHONE W'MSTOWN 4201 



SILOS — Erect a Kalamazoo Rib- 
stone silo. 10% discount if ordered 
now! For prices and information, 
call A. R. Kwozalla, Erlanger, Ky., 
Route 4. Phone Florence 593. tf-49 

FOR SALE — Golden Yellow Rasp- 
berry, Honey Sweet Black Rasp- 
berry, and Boysenberry plants. P. 
R. Connelly, 44 High St., Walton, 
Ky. ' it-io* 

REFRIGERATOR, 8'x2%' self-ervice, 
electric, used as vegetable case, 
butter box, bottle cooler; also one 
deep freeze box, 10 cu. ft. Phone 
HEmlock 5652. Very reasonable. 

2t-9 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING — It works, 
it pays, it gets calves. Sign up in 
the Boone County Artificial Breed- 
ing Cooperative. Call J* M. Tay- 
lor, Walton 582, tf-45 



FOR SALE — Jersey cows, heifers, 
calves artificially sired and bred, 
some open; T. B. and Bang tested. 
Ishmael & Jackson, Kenton, Ky. 
Phone Ind. 6408. . 4t-9 



Thursday, March 9, 1950 



FOR RENT— Acre for tomatoes, in 
Walton. Phone Walton 512X. 

lt-10* 



FOR SALE— Timothy hay, baled. J. 
E. Huff, 4 miles South of Walton, 
1% miles North of C«Hfenden, U. 
S. 25, West side reakoad. Phone 
Ind. 6499. 2t-10* 



FOR SALE — Fryers, dressed or on 
foot. Mrs. Ethel Sheppard. Phone 
Walton 1813. lt-10* 



FOR SALE— Set work harness and 
turning plow. Ell Russell, Bank 
Lick Station. Phone Ind. 6252. 

2t-9« 



FINE WATCH & CLOCK REPAIR— 
. First class work, guaranteed, good 
service. Give us a trial. Huber's 
Jewelry, 124 Dixie Highway, Erl- 
anger, Ky. tf-2 



FOR SALE or TRADE— Hammermill 
with gasoline motor. P. J. Maddin, 
Walton, Ky., Route 2. Phone Wal- 
ton 271. 2t-9 



FARMS WANTED-Small or large; 
we have a large list of customers 
waiting. For quick, reliable realty 
service, call us. Sallee Real Estate 
Co., 108 Locust St., Erlanger, Ky. 
Phone Dixie 7119. tf-4 



SEWING MACHINE SALES & SER- 
VICE—AH nationally advertised 
sewing machines sold and repair- 
ed at reasonable prices. Free home 
estimates. Phone E. Tnobe, AXtel 
7002, Ludlow, Ky. Representing 
Brant Sewing Machine Co., Cin- 
cinnati's largest Independent sew- 
ing machine dealers. tf -1 



FOR RENT — Six -room house, coal 
furnace, running water; garage, 
chicken house, garden. Phone Wal- 
ton 512X. lt-10* 



FOR SALE-T-First, second and, third 
cutting of alfalfa, baled; timothy 
and clover; also timothy and clov 
er, mixed. McBee Bros., Williams 
town. Phone Williamstown 4192 
or 4073. 8t-4" 

STARTED CHICKS at Bargain Prices! 
Thousands on hand. All breeds. 
One week old, $13.90 per 100; two 
weeks old, $17.90; three weeks old, 
$22.90. Plenty of feed, brooders and 
poultry supplies. Come to the 
hatchery and see these bargains. 
Vicitors welcome. Mt. Healthy 
Hatcheries, Winton & McKelvey 
Roads, Mt. Healthy, Ohio. Phone 
Jackson 9354. lt-8 



Farm Auction 



.-00 P. M. 

Fast Time 



63V2 ACRES - FURNITURE - ANTIQUES 

Tuesday, March 14 ' 

Property of S. H. Northcutt, located on the Lemon and Northcutt Pike, about 2 x / 2 
Miles off U. S. 25, intersecting about midway between Dry Ridge and Sherman, in 
Grant County, Kentucky. Look for Auction Signs! 

Due to Mr. Northcutt's age and health, he has decided to sell his farm, furniture 
and miscellaneous items on above date, as follows: * 

FARM DESCRIPTION— Mr. Northcutt has owned and lived on this farm for over 
half a century; a lot of the land has not been plowed in this period of time; the farm 
lays well; nice lot of ridg eland; well watered; will be offered in four tracts, with rig 
ht to group any tracts. 

TRACT I — Contains 47 acres, more or less; choice land, with a lot of good ridge 
land; good road frontage; well watered; improvements consist of a 4-room house, 
new roof, combination barn, meat house, poultry house; electric on farm; corn crib 
and stripping room in barn. 

TRACT II — Contains 5 acres, more or less; strong land; lays well; on beautiful 
ridge; good road frontage; joins Tract I; on this tract is large frame building, known 
as Northcutt school house, a good building— four rooms and front porch, one large 
school room could be cut into additional rooms; building is storm sided, weather- 
boarded, all sealed with first class lumber; tihis building is on a solid concrete foun- 
dation; building and land to be offered separately and as a whole; large cistern at 
house; anyone wanting a baby farm — see this one. 

TRACT III — Contains 10 acres, more or less, with lot of locusts, good pond, lot of 
road frontage; has building site; no buildings. 

TRACT IV — Contains 1 ]/ 2 acres, lays well, road frontage, good building site. 

Farrn-is well located, blacktop pike, school bus, milk route, R. F. D. carrier, rolling 
stores, bakery route, telephone and electric. Look this far mover any day by con- 
tacting the agent. Sign on property. 

FURNITURE — Antiques and miscellaneous — will fallow the land sale. 

TERMS — Personal property, cash; real estate, on-e third of purchase price paid 
down day of sale, remainder with deed within 10 days. Immediate possession. 

Sale Conducted By """* 

S. R. ECKLER REALTY & AUCTION CO. 

Dry Ridge, Kentucky Phones: Office, 6581; Residence, 8146 

ft 

OR SEE JAKE LINDSEY 



LOOK FOLKS— 100 White Leghorn 
cockerels, $3.00. First conie, first 
served. A bargain. Fine for broil- 
ers. Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, Win- 
ton & McKelvey Roads, Mt. 
Healthy, Ohio. lt-8 



FOR SALE— 40 bales mixed, good 
quality, timothy and alfalfa hay. 
Goshorn Road, off Fiskburg and 
Morning View Road. R. N. Elliott. 

lt-10* 



WANTED— Part time waitress, and 
woman to cook, good hours. Ap- 
ply Phoenix Hotel, Walton. Phone 
29. tf. 10 



PLAN NOW TO COMBAT 
EUROPEAN CORNBORER 

Since the European comborer has 
been found in 79 Kentucky counties, 
the Agricultural Experiment Station 
at Lexington suggests that farmers 
do whatever they can to avoid dam- 
age by this pest. 

One ithlng they can do is to plant 
only hybrid corn known to be adapt- 
ed to the locality. Hybrid com us- 
ually makes a fair ydeld despite the 
borer. 



Then It is a good Idea to confer 
with the county agent about the 
time of planting. The past year, *he 
most borers were found dn corn 
planted about May 20 around Lex- 
ington. Corn planted early in May 
suffered the least damage. 

'Destruction of cornstalks and other 
refuse in which borers overwinter Is 
considered desirable. This Is best 
done by clean plowing, that is, bury- 
ing the stalks we'll. 

Spraying with DDT and other ma- 
terials has been done with consider- 
able success. sA 

^-1 

Hancock county farmers growing 
two varieties of tobacco found In 
most oases that Ky. 35 was as good, 
and frequently better, than the other 
variety. 

In Garrard county, 458 boys and 
girls have enrolled in 12 organized 
4-H clubs. ' 



YOU BREAK 'EM — We fix 'em. 
Hagedorn Maytag Sales & Service, 
Erlanger, Kentucky. Phone Dixie 
7113. » tf-46 



INSURANCE SERVICE — Boone Co- 
unty Farm Bureau now offers it's 
members life insurance, auto and 
truck insurance (largest dn Ken- 
tucky), fire and windstorm cover- 
age, comprehensive liability in- 
surance and Blue Cross Hospitali- 
zation. John E. Crigler, agent, 
Burlington, Ky. tf-2 



JOHNNY'S 
GENERAL STORE 

ATWOOD, KY. Phone Ind. 5139 

Now Has a Complete Line of Shoes 
For Every Member Of the Family! 

MEN'S WORK SHOES ... $5.25 to $6.25 

MEN'S DRESS SHOES $4.49 to $5.95 

BOYS' WORK SHOES ... $3.79 

BOYS' DRESS SHOES $4.35 

GIRLS' OXFORDS ^ $3.59 

WOMEN'S OXFORDS— Brown - White $4.10 

MISSES' OXFORDS $2.00 - $3.49 

SMALL GIRLS' PATENT LEATHER $3.10 

INFANT SHOES ..... $1.59 



II 



Here's what BUTTER 
would cost you today 




...if it had come down from its 1939 price 
like the unit cost of ELECTRICITY 

» .. ,. . » 

Other prices have soared in the last 10 years, but your electricity it 
one thing you buy that actually costs less per unit now than pre-war. 

Your electric rates have not been increased, and as use has gone up 
the average price per kilowatt-hour has come down. It is now 30% 
less than in 1939. 

If creamery butter had followed the same trend, the pound that cost 
you 27c in 1939 would cost 19c today, instead of the 65c or more you 
are now paying. 

true, your electric bill may be higher, because if yours is the average 
household you're using 68% more electricity than in 1939. But the 
price you pay per kilowatt-hour was never lower than it is today! 

) 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

p IHCC — 

I/O** QtdutdLf, 



INCORPORATED 



*" 



I 



Thursday, March 9, 1 950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 




Mr. and Mrs. Grover Young of La- 
tonla, were Sunday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clinton F. Cleek. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Callen were the 
Sunday afternoon callers on Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Wood of Richwood. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Chapman had 
as Sunday guests, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. 
King of Latonia, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Bernard Wilson of Verona. 

Mrs. Joe Wilson of Fiskhurg spent 
Monday with her daughter, Mrs. 
George Bickers. 



Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Lusby visited 
Mt. Lusby's sister, Mrs. Ann Perkins, 
in Owenton, Saturday night and 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Lusby and 
children spent Saturday with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. V. Raymond in Warsaw. 

Jean Burton spent Sunday with 
Janet Webb. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Summey of 
Whites Tower and Mrs. Jim Stone 
spent Monday with Mr. and Mrs. Leo 
Flynn and family. 




I 
I 

I 

I 

I 



1947 INTERNATIONAL l/ 2 -ton Panel Truck, extra 
» good condition, only 20,000 acual miles, will 
guarantee. ■ r t . 

1935 FORD 1 |/2-ton Truck, box and rack body, ex- 
cellent condition. 

1 946 FORD Coupe, real clean car, only 24,000 miles, 
runs perfect, will sacrifice for quick sale. 

1940 OLDS 4-Door Sedan, motor recently overhauled, 
good tires and finish, new slhocks; a real buy. 

1940 PONTIAC 4-Door Sedan, good upholstering and 
finish, runs good. 

1 939 CHEVROLET Town Sedan, motor just overhaul- 
ed, good upholstering, finish, tires, runs perfect. 

1935 CHEVROLET 4-Door Sedan, good solid car, runs 
good; for cheap transportation, don't miss this. 

Dixie Chevrolet Sales 

Jack Sahnger— SALESMEN — Joe Dringenburg 
PHONE 95 WALTON, KY. 



Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Daniels of Ve- 
rona Road entertained for dinner on 
Saturday, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. JToLmer 
and son of Covington, Route 3, Mr. 
and Mrs. Blaine Daniels of Kenton 
Vales, and M*. and Mrs. Marvin 
Pennington of Washington, D. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Praither and 
Mr. and Mis. Franklin Breeden had 
as their weekend guests, Mr. and 
Mrs. Estle E. Hughes, Carl Hughes, 
and Walter Hughes, all of St. Alban, 
W. Va., and Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Austin of Columbus, Ohio. 

Mrs, Reamy Simpson hSs return- 
ed home from the hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Pennington 
•left Sunday for Washington, X). C, 
after a (twelve-day visit with rela- 
tives and friends here. 



Page Seven 



Albert Day had as Sunday guests 
Robert Morris and family of Rose- 
dale; Mrs. Georgia Wilson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. 
M. S. Caswell and son, Mrs. Norvln 
Sharon "and son, and Miss Maggie 
Caswell, of Covington; Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Day and son, of Morrow, O.; 
Clyne Bickers, of Fiskburg; Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Sowder, of Erlahger; 
Mrs. Annie Burton and family and 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day and fam- 
ily. 

Curtis Goodpaster is ill at his home 

on North Main Street. 

<» 

Mrs. Claude Vice of Gardnersville 
is visiting her sister and husband, 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Vallanding- 
ham. 

Mrs. Pearl R. Johnson of Covington 
was* the guest of relatives here last 
Wednesday and attended the Wo- 
man's LiteraTy Club meeting at the 
home of Mrs. C. Scott Chambers. 

Misses Ruth Ann and Louise Is- 
bell of Russell Springs, were week- 
end guest of their aunt, Mrs. P. R. 
Connelly. 

Mrs. Leo Flynn and daughter, 
Lynnelle, are ill at their home on 
Stephenson Mill Road. 

Mrs. C. S. Vallandingham, Mrs. 
Gordon Philips, Mrs. Eugene Size- 
more, Mrs. J. T. Stone and Mrs. Pearl 
Johnson attended the Past Matrons 
and Past Patrons banquet at the 
Masonic Temple, Covington, Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Pennington and 
Clarence Walton and friend from 
Upper Sandusky, Ohio attended 
church services in Walton, Sunday 
and were afternoon callers on Mr. 
and Mrs. Aubrey Eckler. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Ferguson and 
son Norman were Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Porter, Verona. 

Try Our "WANT ADS" for Results! 



Raising of Adapted Hybrid 
Corn Will Increase Profits 




The planting of adapted hybrid 
corn will retain profits to the pro- 
ducer by saving labor, increasing 
yields, lowering production costs and 
promoting better fanning practices. 
Hybrid corn will have labor because 
(1) it is not generally necessary to 
thiin or replant the crop, (2) the 
stalks of most hybrids stand up, even 
against heavy winds, and the corn 
ds therefore more easly ^handled, and 
(3) hybrid corn husks easier than 
open pollinated varieties. Certified 
seed of hybrid 



com is accurately 
graded and at least 90% of it ger- . 
minates with strong sprouts. It is i h *S' ner yielding white hybrids bring 



Ky. 102. It is later and taller than 
US 13, 'but earlier and not as tall as 
Ky. 102. Very dependable under all 
conditions, one of the most popular 
hybrids in the state. A yellow hy- 
brid, 128 days to maturity. 

Ky. 203 is a high yielding whdte 
hybrid, moderately early, with good 
sized ears, grains are not too hard. 
It ds dependable ver a wide area; 
128 days to maturity. 

The decision of planting white or 
yellow hybrids depends on the use 
to which .the corn will be put. The 



farm homes, 
tool sheds. 



\ 

Come See! Come Drive! 

1950 STUDEBAKER 

* * 

Now at New 

Low Prices 



therefore safe to plant It at the de- 
sired thickness so the crop will not 
have to he thinned. 

In many tests throughout the 
state, Kentucky hybrids produced 
mote corn than local varieties. Hy- 
brids are more dependable than the !££££ p 1 ™,*' 
open-pollinated varieties, especially ' 
in hot, dry seasons and when there 
are heaivy winds. Hybrid corn, by 
saving labor and increasing yields, 
lowers the production cost per acre 
resulting in higher profits to the pro- 
ducer. 

Hybrid corn promotes better farm- 
ing practices because it's higher 
yields will produce the needed a- 
mount of corn on fewer acres, leav- 
ing less productive land in sod. As 
hybrid corn matures earlier than 
open-pollinated varieties cover crops 
can be seeded earlier and do a bet- 
ter job of protecting land during the 
winter. 

While hybrid corn will average 
higher yields than other varieties it 
must ibe remembered that moist 
fertile soils increase yields more than 
any other thing. The plowing under 
of cover crops, manure and straw do 
much to build up the humus' in the 
soil and increase 'its water holding 
capacity. The addition of lime, phos- 
phate and complete fertilizer go a 
long way in increasing yields. 

US 13 is the earliest hybrid re- 
commended for Kentucky. It has a 
low, strong stalk and an excellent 
root. A yellow hybrid, 125 days to 
maturity. 

Ky. 102 is about 10 days later than 
US 13. It has a strong stalk, it is 
leafy and useful for silage as well 
as grain. A yellow byhrid, 135 days 
to maturity. 

Ky. 103 falls between US 13 and 



more for milking purposes, and are 
less damaged by earworms. The 
yellow hybrids are best for feeding, 
especially where green feed ds lack- 
ing, as they contain more Vitamin A. 
Two hew hybrids have bean de- 
veloped that give promise of foe- 
They are, Ky. 158, 
a yellow hybrid, and Ky. 405 B, a 
white hybrid. Both have been tried 
exteinsively and compare favorably 
in yields with Ky. 103 and Ky. 203. 



Having pastured sheep on Ky. 31 
fescue and Ladino clover since 1946, 
G. E. Jones of Lyon county sowed 95 
additional acres last fall. 

Dtiring the past month, Union co- 
unty farmers requested from their 
county agent building plans for 



NOW 

is the time 
to get your 

DEKALB 

HYBRID 
SEED CORN 

See Either of These Dealers: 

Joe Neumeister 
Clayton Percival 

Phone Ind. 6114 



poultry houses and 




Vick's Sales & Service 

South Main Street Walton, Kentucky 

PHONE: WALTON 18 or IND. 6495 

WRECKER SERVICE 

(Day or Night) 

GULF GAS - OIL - GREASING 

FREE— Grease Job with Each 75 Gallons of 
Regular or Ethyl Gas Purchased! 



w 



AUCTION 






Down 



YOU CAN DRIVE AWAY 

A New 1950 

STUDEBAKER 

6-Passenger 2-Door Sedan 

For As Low As 

STUDEBAKER BJEST MILEAGE CAR 
IN THE LOW PRICED FIELD! 

FRIED! 

Your Friendly Studebaker Dealer 
105 EAST 4th NEAR 4th & SCOTT COLONIAL 024S 

COVINGTON, KY. 



1:00 
p. in. 



Sat'day, March 18 

Having sold my farm, located 1 Mile West of Verona, 

I am offering for sale my nice dairy herd, with 

the other following described property: 

LIVESTOSK — Spotted Jersey cow, 6 years old, giving 3 gallons milk daily; Hol- 
stein cow, 4 years old, will freshen in April; Jersey cow, 3 years old, will freshen in 
March ; 2 Jersey cows, 5 years old, giving 3 gallons of milk daily, fresh in June ; 
Jersey cow, 5 years old, fresh in July, giving 3 gallons milk daily ; Guernsey cow, 6 
years old, fresh in June, giving good flow of milk ; large Jersey & Shorthorn cow, 6 
years old, giving 3 gallons milk daily, will be fresh in July; Jersey heifer, with calf 
by side; Guernsey cow, 6 years old, giving 4 gallons milk daily, freshened first day 
of March ; Whitef ace cow, 3 years old, fresh this month ; .1 6-months-old Guernsey 
bull; 4-months-old heifer calf; 2 Guernsey heifer calves, ready to turn out; Guern- 
sey bull calf, 8 weeks old. 

DAIRY EQUIPMENT— New 6-can Wilson milk cooler; washing vat; 12-gallon 
eectric heater for milk house ; 7 ten-gallon milk cans. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS — Disc harrow; far mwagon; 2-horse sled; 2-horse corn 
drill; Rastus plow; chilled plow; lay-off plow; team of white mares. ' „ 

CECIL SEBREE 



VERONA, KY. 



PHONE WALTON 845 



Sale Conducted By 



HARRY F. JOHNSON 

AUCTION CO.— PHONE IND. 6196 



n 



Page Eight 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, March 9, 1950 




Mr a^nd Mrs. Allen Rogers had as but kept the check so long that it 
a weekend guest, Miss Mildred Zim- | can no longer be cashed. Many 
merman of Staffordsburg. Sunday other checks are older than the ten 
callers were Mr. and Mrs. Virgil year statute of limitations and there- 
Hensley, John and children of Port- fore void. The writers of other 
land and Freddy Sharon. checks have either died or disap- 

Mrs. Allen Rogers and Miss Mild- peared. Tom Qlsen in "Now," sug- 
red were in Cincinnati, Saturday, gests that before criticizing the wid- 
shopping. ow for not making real use of all her 

Claude Williamson remains quite riches, if you are a believer in the 
ill at his home. Lord Jesus Christ, ask yourself this 

The Independence Homemakers question: "What real use am I mak- 
will meet with Mrs. J. C. Reynolds ing of the room after Toom of spirit- 
on March 9th at her home on Taylor ual treasurers to be found in the 
Mill Road Holy scriptures?" The Bible con- 

Week of Prover Program tains the mind of God> the state of 

On Wednesday night of last week man, the way ? «£*««Mh« doom 
the Woman's Missionary society of £ sinners and thehappiness of be- 
the Independence Baptist Church ."ever*. #'« doctrines are h°ly, *ts 
gave a special Week of Prayer pro- precepts are binding ts histories 
|ram at the prayer meeting hour, art true, and it's decisions are im- 
Rev. Chase Jennings, city mission- mutab ^ ®f ad " ^ %2\?Z 
ary, due to slippery roads, failed to «e« ft to be safe and practice it to 
arrive for a special talk. Mrs. Agnes De ' nolv - 
Dorsey and Mrs. ALf B'Hymer made Girl Scout Cookie Sale 
impromptu talks and John Houston The Girl scouts of Kenton county 
and T. J. Cain gave instrumental begin their cookie sa i e March 11th 
duet, which was foHowed by- vocal and it will con tinue through March, 
duet by Miss JanetMcGraw and Miss The local droops w jh take orders for 

cookies and deliver later. Proceeds 



go for upkeep of the county office 



Charlene Mills. The pastor, W. E 

Maners, brought a special message 

on prayer from the 5th Psalm. There and the cause of Scouts. 

'were several compliments on the 

program. 

The younger children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lee Houston, Dorothy, David 
and Paul, were in bed last week due 
to thg lagrippe. 
Mrs. Swinford Passes * * 



The Kenton County Girl Scout 
banquet is to be held at the Elk's 
Hall, Covington, March 14. Members 
of the Scouts from Independence are 
going. Parents of these Scouts are 
also invited. The county organiza- 
tion of Girl Scouts will be 38 years 



Office Brightened Up Mrs. Wallace Williams has been 

The Clerk's office in Independence' under the weather with a cold, but 
is brightened up with new, needed j s out again. 

files and equipment to .the amount Claude Reeves of near Banklick 
of $600, which was a surplus earned station is back from the hospital and 
in this office and retained for home working again. 

use rather than being sent to Frank- 1 mjs. Baldwin of Covington, grand- ! 
fort. The county's money Is toeing mother of Harold Callen of Maher 
used here as far as possible. R oa d, was buried last week. 

George A. Damon, deputy clerk, rj ew Games 
reports that of March 3rd, there have The Independence Baptist church 
been 207 more auto registrations has purchased some new games for 
th«n of the same date of last year, the regular Saturday night recrea- 
This refers to passenger cars. tion for young people. A survey was! 

Wilbur Stith and family, nephew ma 4 e some weeks ago of the reore- 
of local barber, L. M. Stith, left Or- ational equipment of some of the 
lando, Fla., by plane Friday, Feb. 24 i g cnurches in the city and it was; 
after school was out, and visited here learned this local church possessed 
and at Sherman and Williamstown, more equipment for physical exer- 
and returned Monday morning in dse than any church interviewed, 
time for the children to get back in Mrs. Mary Collins is in charge of 
school. i this clean wholesome passtime for 

The WMS of the Independence youngsters, who have been enjoying 
Baptist Church will have the next it about a year. Careful Christian 
program at 10:30, March 16 at the supervision is maintained and noth- 
home of Mrs. George Riley. i ing is .permitted that savors of 

Those from Independence visiting gambling, dancing or drinking of 
the funeral home and attending the anything other than soft drinks 
funeral of Mrs. W. K. Swinford at which are furnished by the church. 
Cyrnthiana, were: Mr. and Mrs. C. E.» • Ethel Millbaugh, daughter of Mr. 
McGraw, Mrs. John Shaw, Mrs. H. L. and Mrs. Ohas. Millbaugh, who was 
Faulkner, Rev. W. E. Maners and injured playing with a sled last 
Walter Moffett. | week, came home Friday from the 

B. Cummins, who was recently hospital but is to stay in for a week. 

kicked by a horse, is home from the , ■ 

hospital. in an official rating of all Ayr- 

Leslie Damon of Taylor Mill Road, shire dairy herds in the United 
has sold his interest in the Whites states, the herd at Pine Mountain 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

rVfnitfFY CORP. 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 

Phone HEmlock 2458 



E. B. Swinford, deacon and ,ro»m. ld on the date of tMs banquet. The 



ber of the offkiz! " :ii*-TJf»the In- 
dependence Baptist Church, lost his 
[mother, Mrs. Mitylene Swinford, 79, 
of Cynthiana. She died at the Harris 
Memorial Hospital there Wednesday 
at 2 a. m. The survivors are the hus- 
band, W. K. Swinford; five sons, E. 
B. and James Swinford, Covington, 
Route 3, Carl Swinford, Versailles, 
Alvin Swinford, New York, and Otis 
Swinford, Albuquerque, N. M., and 
•one sister, Mrs. Clay Berry of Cynth- 
dana. Funeral services were held 
last Friday at 2 p. m. All the chil- 
dren were present. 
The Wealthy Widow? 

Mrs. Linda Belle Titus Knox, 94, a 
widow who lived in a small room on 
the third floor at 1500 Jackson Blvd., 
Chicago, died No. 9, 1949. She was 
known as a purchaser of antiques. 
After her death, the administrator 
of the estate found a 50-year-old ac- 
cumulation of valuable chinaware, 
paintings and unopened crates and 
trunks crowding the ceiling of more 
than a dozen, dust-filled unlighted 
rooms. Also, twenty other rooms 
full of antique furniture have been 
found in a River Forest mansion, 
which Mrs. Knox purchased in 1932. 
Various desks contained $5,000 in 
cash and $22,000 in uncashed checks 
and money orders. The money ord- 
ers for several hundred dollars had 
been kept too long to be redeemed. 
She wrote to Washington to ex- 
change them for a treasury check, 



DR. WALTER E. TAIT 
DR. PAUL H. BALDWIN 

— OPTOMETRISTS — 

Hours: 9:30 to 5:00. Wednesday. 9:30 to 12:00 

27 East 7th St. Covington, Ky. HEmlock 2088 



§m 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 






Independence Girl Scouts will be 
four years old the day after this 
banquet — March 15. Independence 
has three troops, Brownies, Intermed- 
iates and Seniors. 

The Girl Scout Leaders' Associa- 
tion is planning a trip to Washing- 
ton, D. C, and 'will leave on the B. 
& O., March 31st and return April 3. 
Some of the local girls will be in this 
group which expects to . see Vice 
President Barkley, who has written 
that he will 'be glad to receive them 
if he is in the city. Other .points of 
interest to be visited are Annapolis, 
Mt. Vernon and Alexandria. Some of 
the girls planning to go are: Lavara 
Deirtz, Dorothy Boyd, Nancy Arm- 
strong and some others along with 
leaders, Miss Madeline Selman, Mrs. 
Carl Moon and Mrs. Wilma Moore. 
In previous years the Leaders' As- 
sociation has visited Lexington and 
My Old Kentucky Home. 

George Riley, sales manager of the 
Kenton County Motors, was shut in 
last week due to influenza, but is 
on the go again. 

Benson-Coppage 

Congratulations go this week to 
Donald Lee Coppage and Rdselyn 
Benson, who were married Feb. 25. 
Mr. Coppage is a former basketball 
player at Simon Kenton and is now 
a professional baseball player, be- 
ing a pitoher with the Detroit Tigers. 



Tower Grocery tp his co-owner bro 
ther, Gilbert Damon. 

Ralph Beech, formed tenant on the 
Allie Allnubt farm south of town, 
has become the tenant df John Shaw 
on Taylor, Mill Road. This farm is 
milking 20 cows and consists of 150 
acres. — • . ■•. >» 

Oval Petty, formerly of Taylor Mill 
community, but now in Covington, 
is reported in poor health. 

Ruth Ann, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Cox of McMill}an Drive, I 
took sick last weekend and is still; 
shut in. 

Kenneth Galloway", carpenter, and j 
father of L. M. Galloway, local groc- 1 
er, fell from a low scaffold while 
working on the new brick .home of 
his son and fractured his hip. The 1 
local fire department ambulance I 
brought him to the office of Dr. 
Kratz for a hypodermic and theni 
took him on to Covington for X-rays. 



Settlement School was placed in the 
upper 10%. . . • 

The Davis Dairy of Hager Hill, Ky., 
has installed a pasteurizing plant, 
making the second in Johnson coun- 
ty. ; . : _ • . 

:"»»•,:■- ''■:.-'»■ " " ' j :«» ; 



Sturgeon Electric 

LIGHT & POWER WIRING 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 
AND APPLIANCES 

Stove & Water Heater Installation 

Ph. Walton 71 or 1396 



i 



FOR SALE 

FISKBURG, KY.— Corner of Elliott road and LLL concrete highway; 

' beautiful 7-room home, large living room with fireplace, full 
basement, furnace, built-in garage, large shady front yard, 23/ 4 
acres level land, fa-cu..* r tobacco base, double deck chicken house 
and other outbuildings; bus service; this is a real country home, 
ideal location; drive out and look it over— $7,500. 

U. S. 42—18 miles from Florence, 5 acres with y 4 -mile frontage on 
U. S. 42; 3-room cottage and other outbuildings; bus service; 
VACANT. Full price. $2,175; $400 down, balance. $25 per month. 

M. "Ted" Williams, Realtor - Dl 8017 

2636 DIXIE HIGHWAY, LAKESIDE PARK. COVINGTON. KY. 
(Next door to Retschulte) 



TELEVISION 

— General Electric, Emerson and Crosley — 

G. E. and Philco Refrigerators; G. E. and Easy Washers; 
G. E. and Philco Home Freezers ; we also have our ser- 
vice department for televisions and refrigerators. 

Easy Terms! Liberal Trade-In Allowance! 

R. W. Gross Appliances 



Phone Ind. 5111 



Independence, Ky. 



Farms-Homes rc R sale 

100 ACRES— 6 rooms and bath, full basement, furnace, running 
water; this house is strictly modern; buildings are extra good. 
If you want a nice farm, this will suit anybody. Only 15 minutes 
drive from Florence, on State Highway. Price $19X100. 

56V2 ACRES — 6 miles from Walton; 4 rooms and bath, basement, 
furnace, running water, hot and cold, wired for electric stove; 
combination barn, fixed for cows; lot of outbuildings; this is a 
nice one. Price $14,000. 

51 ACRES — New 2-room house. Price $8,500. 

81/2 ACRES — 4 rooms and bath, full basement, furnace, hardwood 
floors, running water. Price $7,500. 

FLORENCE — 4-room house with bathroom, running water, screen- 
ed-in porch, city water and gas, lot 95x140. Price 58,000. 

WALTON — 3-room house, two large porches, one-half block from 
bus line. Price $2,750. '' 

VERONA— 10-room house, basement, furnace, fixed for 2 families, 
double garage, two chicken houses, approximately 1 acre of 
ground, 2/10 acre tobacco base; bus service. Price $6,800. 

10 MILES from Florence — About one block off Highway 42; 5 -room 
house, water in kitchen, garage, close to church, busses, tele- 
phone. Price $3,000. 

50 ACRES — 9 miles from Florence; good land. Price $8,500. 

R.P.COLEMAN 



Real Estate and Auction Sales 



FLORENCE. KY. 



PHONE FLORENCE 148 



146 Acres . At Absolute 



To Be Sold In 3 Tracts - Will Not Be Grouped 

Mrs. Eula Alexander and son, Holly Alexander, have contracted with me to sell at Absolute Auction, their 146- 
acre farm (to be sold in 3 tracts), and all Livestock and Farming Implements, located in sight of Route 42, on 
RICE PIKE, near UNION, KY., and only 6 miles from Florence, Ky., (follow auction arrows) on 



Friday, March 1 7 



10:30 a.m. 
Sharp 



PROPERTY TO BE SOLD AT 2:00 P. M. 

TRACT NO.- 1—100 acres, all factor land with 
5 -room house, combination barn fixed for dairy, milk 
house, corn crib, smoke house with basement, chicken 
house, and other outbuilding's ; this 1 00 acres has ap- 
proximately i/2-mile road frontage, well watered, lot 
of hay, including some new alfalfa. 

TRACT NO. 2 — 30 acres, no buildings, has beau- 
tiful building site, with natural drainage, lot of road 
frontage. 

TRACT NO. 3 — 16 acres, no buildings. 
Acreages are approximate, survey is being completed. 

Reason for selling on account of the death of Mr. 
Alexander. LUNCH WILL BE SERVED! 



LIVESTOCK Q FARMING IMPLEMENTS— 

10 DAIRY COWS— 6 Holstein, and 4 Jersey and 
Guernsey, some fresh and balance springers ; 2 bulls ; 
8 small heifers; 2 bull calves, and 4 Holstein- Jersey 
heifers, springers. 

Single unit milker; 6-can cooler; electric water 
heater; washing vat; 8 milk cans; milking utensils. 

3 work horses and harness; 1 sow and 4 gilts, to 
farrow, Duroc; chickens and turkeys. 

International tractor; plows and harrows; cut-off 
saw; horse mower; hay rake; wagon and hay frame; 
2-horse cultivator; 2-row corn planter; 4 plows; 
Hammermill and belt ; sled; small tools, too numerous 
to mention; fence stretchers; tobacco sticks, and 100 
bushels of corn. 



TERMS: Cash on all chattels; real estate, 20% down day of sale, and balance with deed on or before 30 days. 

Here's your chance to buy some of Boone county's fertile land, ideally located, just a nice distance off main 
highway^oh good road, close to town, schools and churches. Drive out and see' me property &t your convenience 
— -will be glad to sbow anyone. 



R. P. COLEMAN 

Real Estate & Auction Sales 



Highway 42 - Florence, Ky. 
Phone Florence 148 



y\ 



Thursday, March 9, 1 950 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Wakon, Kentucky 



Page Nine 



Baby Chicks 



Pullorum Passed N. H. Reds - White Rocks 

Member of Kentucky Poultry Improving Assn. 

Jamesway Equipment - Salisbury Remedies 

Provico Feeds 



Pollitt's Hatchery & Supplies 



FLORENCE, KY. 



PHONE 159 



We Will Have A Carload of Blue Diamond 
Block Coal This Week ... Also A Car of 
Stoker Coal! 

Allen's Coal & Feed 

(Formerly Walton & Readnour) 

PHONE 154 . WAfc.xJrVtfY. 



" • ANNOUNCEMENT 

TRY OUR NEW . . . 

Laundry Service 

. . . AND BE SATISFIED! 

Beginning Monday, March 6th, we will pick up and 
deliver laundry. All work done in a first class plant. 
Men's shirts* finished the way they like them. 

Modern Dry Cleaners 

WILLIAMSTOWN, KY. * PHONE 6951 

WE PICK UP AND DELIVER ' 

ALTERATIONS - DYEING - WEAVING 



BEAVER LICK 



Mrs. Mary Alien spent the week 
end with her daughter and family 
of Verona. 

Quite a ,few from this community 
have been enjoying the basketball 
tournaments. 

Mrs. Zetita Hamilton of Piner and 
Mr. and Mrs. James Hamilton of 
Covington spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Elbert Moore and family. 

Mrs. J. K. Henry of Constance and 
Miss Evelyn Henry and J. T. Mulli- 
gan spent Sunday evening with Mr. 
and Mrs. Elbert Moore. 

Alford Stephenson has purchased 
a new car. 

Miss Jessie Stephenson is spend- 
ing a week at Independence, with 
her grandparents. 



PAINT LICK 



Just Try a "WANT AD" in The ADVERTISER and See! 



Public Sale 

1 am retiring from the farm and will sell at Auction 

2 MILES WEST OF VERONA, KENTUCKY 

(At the Nell Hamilton Farm) 

Sat'day, March 1 1 

— Beginning at 1 : 00 P. M. — 

2 mares, good workers; 2-year-old unbroke colt; cow, 
5 years old, calf just gone; 3-year-old cow, milking well; 
40 laying hens; wagon and box bed; 2-horse sled; mow- 
ing machine; disc harrow; hay rake; new Rastus plow; 
land plow; hoes, forks, and other small tools of all kinds; 
gas stove with meter; bedstead; couch; table and six 
chairs; wood heater; 8-day clock, and other items too 
numerous to mention. 

JAMES BREWER 

HARRY F. JOHNSON 



Auctioneer — Phone Independence 6196 
CLERK: CARL JUSTICE 



■■■ 



Linda Hopperton spent Wednes- 
day with her grandparents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Basil Rider. 

Edgar Stahl and little daughters 
called on his mother, Mrs. R. M. Fin- 
n~" \fd Mr. Tinnell, Monday after- 
noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Rider and Wil- 
son Densler spent Monday afternoon 
with Helen Densler and family. 

C. L. Noel was a business visitor 
in Carrol Lton, one day recently. 

Emmiletta Lawson spent Wednes- 
day with Helen Densler and family. 

Basil Rider and Dickey Densler 
were callers in Warsaw, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Sutton, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Hopperton attended the 
funeral of Mr. Sutton's sister, Mrs. 
Rose Turner, Wednesday. We ex- 
tend sympathy to the relatives and 
friends. 

R. M. Finnell spent Friday at Val- 
ley View. 

Sile Rider called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Jake Rider, Monday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. L. French were 
the past weekend guests of her mo- 
ther, Mrs. Baker, and family. 

Mr. ando Mrs. Clifford Rider and 
two sons were visitors in Warsaw, 
Monday. 

Helen M. Sisson, daughter of Mr: 
and Mrs. Iahjnael Sdsson of Indiana, 
is ill with" pneumonia. 

Mrs. Gilbert C. Beall was shopping 
in Cincinnati, Saturday. 

Mrs. Lula Sisson and grandson, 
Dickey Densler, have been very ill 
with the flu. 

Basil Rider caJled on Sile Rider, 
Friday morniing. 



. J. 0. TYSON 

OPTOMETRIST 

Offices At 

MOTCff 

JEWELERS 

613 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours; 10:00 to 5:30 
Wednesday, 10:00 to 12:00 
PHONE: HEMLOCK 1746 



C. L. Noel and son Billy Louis were 
shopping in Cincinnati, Friday. 

Sorry to hear of Walter Noel of 
South Fork falling and cutting his 
head, which required several stdtch- 
es. 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Sutton visit- 
ed relatives in Covington, Saturday 
night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Junior Rider spent 
the weekend with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Vastine. 

Mrs. John Parker, Jo Ann Smith, 
Dorothy O'Donnell, Barbara Craft, 
and Juanita Thomas attended the G. 
A. and coronation services Friday 
until Sunday at Georgetown College! I 

Sorry to hear of Edgap Stahl and 
family moving from our midst, but 
wish to welcome in itheir place, Mr. 
and Mrs. iMelvin Smith and children. 

Mrs, Helen Densler and family had , 
as Sunday guests, Mr. and Mrs. C. ; 
L. Noel and son, Mrs. Gilbert Beall 
and little son and Mills Hemphill. S 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Sutton, Mrs.' 
Mary Rider attended the funeral of i 
Mr. Sutton's aunt, Mrs. Rose Turn- 
er. 



SEE 



NEED FAMILY FINANCE 

UAMITY^ corp. 



CORP. 

427 Madison Ave., Cov. 
Phone HEmlock 2458 



In Loving Memory 

Of Our Dear Husband and Father, 
Charles Elzworth Densler — * 
Just one year ago, today---Maroh 8 
L*rai «t<,<?<,/,.i7ou passed away, 
How we miss you no one knows, 
Why you were taken we don't 
understand, no one knows 4>ut 
God, who can; 

It's so hard to live without you 
But was God's will; 
Sleep on Dear Que, you are at rest 
For God knew best. 
Sadly missed by his wife, Helen, 
and little son, Dickey. 




RAY HALL 

Manufacturing Optician 

Doctor's Optical Prescriptions 

Accurately Filled, Broken 

Lenses Replaced. Expert 

Optical Repairing 

122 PIKE ST. COVINGTON 
HEmlock 1932 




LITTLE SOUTH FORK 



Several in the community attend- 
ed the District tournament held at" 
Gallatin County High School, last 
week. 

Mrs. Raymond Baker, Mrs. Julius 
Sutton, Mrs. Rea Scudder and Mrs. 
Harry Baker attended a Stanley 
party Tuesday evening at Mrs. Mar- 
gie Scudder's. 

Mrs. Rea Scudder had a birthday 
supper Wednesday night in honor 
of her husband's birthday. Those in 
attendance were Mr.< and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Baker and children, Charlie 
Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Scudder 
and daughter, Mrs. Eliza Scudder, 
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Sutton and dau- 
ghter and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Baker 
and daughters. 

Miss Dorothy Boots spent Wednes- 
day night with Miss Barbara Craft. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Sutton were 
callers in Covington, Friday and 
went to see Charles E. Perry at Booth 
Hospital. 

Harry Baker called on Mr. and 
Mrs. C. P. Baker at Walton, Friday 
evening. 

Rev. Joe Johnson, Sally Baker and 
Shirley Sutton spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baker and sons 
of Covington. 




— SERVICE THAT SATISFIES — 

TUNE to WLW, Cincinnati, 12:40, 
Dial 700 for daily market reports 



Norris Brock' Co. 



Cincinnati Stock Yards 

Live Wire and Progressive 
organization, second to none. 
We are strictly sellers on the 
best all-around market in tfie 
country. We hope you will 
eventually ship to us. Why 
not now? 

Reference: Ask the first 
man you meet 



■ *<. 



CALVIN CRESS 

OUR, FARMA.LL MAN , SAYS : 



"drive: this 

F/IRMAt-L CUB 



lil^dl 





FARMAU.-TIME-PR0V6P FOR IMPROVED FARMING- 

CALVIN CRESS & SONS 

Phone 79 Burlington, Ky. 




<i 



Pontiac Trade-in Sale 

Reconditioned - Guaranteed 

'49 CHEVROLET 2-door deluxe $1995 

'48 OLDSMOBILE "6" black 2-door $16.95 

'47 DODGE black deluxe sedan $1295 

'46 FORD super deluxe dub coupe : $895 

'41 PONTIAC black 2-door $695 

'41 PACKARD 6-cylinder sedan . ... $595 

'37 PONTIAC "6" business coupe $695 

'36 DODGE 4-door sedan $195 

Most cars have radios and heaters. Kentucky licenses and tax free. 
TERMS TO SUIT! UP TO 24 MONTHS TO PAY! 

Castleman Pontiac 

1722 Madison CO. 4224 Covington 



I 



Page Ten 



WALTON ADVERTISER, Walton. Kentucky 



Thursday, March 9, 1950 



WANT AD SECTION «jmr 



Classified advertising rat* is 25c 

par ad for leu than 25 words; 

over 25 words, le per word. 

All ads cash In advance. 

FOR SALE — 3 Registered Brown 
Swiss bulls. See R. D. Fettit, Wil- 
liamstown, Ky., or Fred MaGee, 
• Folsom, Ky. Phone 4931 or 5348. 

lt-10 



FOR THE BEST in Electric Wiring- 
Call John T. Campbell, Walton 157. 
Trouble calls day or night. 8t-10* 



FOR SALE— 1946 Farmall "H," two 
14" plows, 7' mower, 7' harrow; all 
In A-l condition. Phone Walton 
S21X. lt-10* 



POR SALE — O. I. C. male hog, can 
be registered. Phone Independence 
6740. lt-10* 

FOR SALE — Antique Cherry chest, 
u silver tea set (4-pdece), marble-top 
tables, and dresser with pivot mir- 
ror. (Mrs. Louella Pettit, Williams- 
town, Ky. lt-10 

FOR SALE — Key making machine I 
and blanks; value, $150.00; will! 
sacrifice for $75.00. Phone Wil- 
liamstown 6951. Modern Dry, 

lt-10* 



FOR SALE — Alfalfa hay, second cut- 
ting; also 200 locust posts. R. 
Casey, Morning View, Ky. 2t-10* 



FOR SALE — Team mare mules, six 
and seven years old; also harness; 
priced to sell. Arthur Brewster, 
Verona, Ky. 2t-10* 



FOR SALE— Wood, 
or 203X. 



Call Walton 707 
2t-10* 



Cleaners. 



FOR SALE — Thor electric washing 
machine, good condition, $15.00. 
Herman Rader, Stephenson Mill 
Road, Walton. lt-10* 



FOR -SALE — 12 ewes and lambs. 
C. L. Leek, Verona, Ky. , Phone 
Walton 847. lt-10* 

FOR SALE — 1948 Hudson 4-door 
Commodore, excellent condition 
mileage 14,00.; " ~'. -oJ * . I 
to setUa estate. Mary L. Rensler, 
158 North Main St., Walton, Ky. 

tf-lO 



FOR SALE — Turkeys, 2 hens and 4 
toms, Broadbreasted Bronze, for 
stock. Myrtle Gatewood, Union, 
Ky. " lt-10 

FOR SALE-<-Used washers, gas or 
electric, guaranteed 1 year. Hage- 
dorn, 856 Dixie Highway, Erlang- 
er, Ky. . , tf-1 

FOR SALE— 3 fuel oil heaters, 50,000 
BTU each, with 55- gallon drums 
and pipe. Mary Lou Tavern, Dixie 
Highway, South of Bnacht Station. 

2t-10* 



FOR SALE-^Good, clean baled hay. 
Soybean at $25.00, alfalfa at $30.00 
ton ; truck load lots. Ryle Ewbank, 
Warsaw, or James Perry, Steeles 
Bottom. 2t-10 



HARDWARE 



FOR SALE— Team of work horses, 8 
years old. G. R. Epperly, Bullock 
Pen Road. Phone Ind. 6696. 4t-8* 



FOR SALE— No. 1 farm horse; set 
of platform scales. Howard Moore, 
Beaver Lick, Ky. lt-10 

RUSSELL'S Refrigeration and Appli- 
ance Service — Refrigerators, milk 
coolers, pumps, etc. Phone Inde- 
pendence 7430. 4t-7* 



FOR SALE— Good work horse, 7 years 
old, sound. E. E. Wilson, Verona, | 
Ky. Phone Walton 765. 2t-10* 



FOR SALE — Hay, straw, corn, alf- 
alfa, mixed hay, timothy, wheat 
or oat straw. Russell Klein, 
Morning Viey, Ky. Phone Ind. 6427 

6t-5* 



BABY CHICKS— 200,000 AAAA grade 
big husky chicks, make excellent 
layers; large fryers^ 21 breeds, , 
blood tested from U. S. Approved ' 
Pullorum passed flocks. Thousands I 
at store every day, also ship Parcel I 
Post $5.95 per 100 and up. Write 
for prices before you buy. Many 
customers report they raise 100%. 
Hoosier, 716 West Jefferson, Louis- j 
ville, Kentucky. tf-10 



FOR RENT— Garden, on shares, al- 
ready plowed. Erma Stockman, 
74 &«**• *£&*■ St, Waltorv ' 



FOR SALE— Fresh cow. Phone Ind. 
7604. Paul Staley, Riggs Road. 

lt-10 



Hamilton & Jones 



Phone 99 



Walton, Ky. 



. Invites You to Shop! 






The Capehart Prelude $279.95 

with Polaf tma (built-in ottial) 

NOW 

TELEVISION 

with 2 Great Exclusive* j 

Exclusive Capehart Tone 

brings television to life! 

Exclusive Polatron* Tuba 

brings new clarity to every 
image! 

ME... HEAR CAPEHART TODAY! 
Prices start at $239.95 



To Prove Yon Can't Match a 

FRIGIDAIRE 

Master Model for 1950 



Service on all types of 
household electric appli- 
ances by Hall's Electric 
and Appliance Service lo- 
cated in store basement. 



Immediate 
Delivery 




Monthly Terms 
If Desired 



Wherever you live — whatever 
the size of your family, kitchen 
or budget — be sure to see the 
'new Frigidajre Refrigerators 
for 1950. See the complete 
line of sizes from 4 to 17 cu. ft. 
— see all the reasons why your 
No. 1 choice is America's No: 1 
Refrigerator, FRIGIDAIRE h 

NEW gold-and-white"target" 
latch and trim 

NEW Super-Storage design 
with full-length door on larger 

modeh 



NEW improved Meter-Miser 

NEW shelves are all-alumi- 
num and rust-proof — 

NEW split shelf allows room 
for large, bulky items 

NEW swing -down shelf for 
butter, cheese, small items 

NEW all -porcelain Twin Hy- 
drators that stack up 

NEW all-porcelain Meat 
Storage Tray 



SPRING Is Just Around the Corner 

and we have a very nice stock of Spring Hardware and Household Supplies ... we 
have just added a new line of electric fixtures and fishing tackle — come in and see 
our displays . . . just received a large shipment of Wolverine gloves — try them on 
and see how soft they are . . . we have a good line of harness, collars, saddles, and 
all parts of harness ... 

50-lb. Cotton Mattress ., ____ 11.75 

9'xl2' Manitex Rugs ___„.„_ 4.95 

9'xl2' Gold Seal Rugs 8.95 

12'xl2' Armstrong Rugs „_„„„__ 15.95 

12'xl5' Armstrong Rugs 18.95 

Linoleum by Sq. Yd. 89c 

Lentex Window 65c 

Plastic Window Shdaes 1.59 

24"x42" Wool Scatter Rugs 1.69 

All Metal Iron Board 8.95 

Heavy Iron Board, pad, cover 2.00 

Plastic Cake Cover _ 1.98 

4-piece Cannister Set 59c 

Folding Wood Clothes Rack 2.25^ 

Baby Ben,, Alarm Clocks _ _<*.*«*" 

Westclox Electric Alarm ..: 4.95 

Sessions Kitchen Clock +'. 4.95 

Taylor-Tot 8.95 

Folding All Aluminum Stroller 1 17.95 

Boy's or Girl's Bicycle 37.00 up 

Maytag Washers , 124.95 up 

Portable Oil Heaters 9.95 up 

Perfection Gas Range ....... 269.50 

Perfection Electric Range 299.50 

Perfection Kerosene Range 139.00 

Perfection 2-burner Cook 39.50 

Knox Coal Range 139.00 

Quick Meal Kerosene Range 59.00 

Used Kelvinator Refrigerator __ 50.00 
New 7 cu. ft. Gibson Refrig. 189.95 
All Kinds of Paint, Enamels, Shellac, 

Varnish, etc. 
Large stock Round, Flat and Angle Iron 



Plow Handles __ 85c 

Wheelbarrow Handles :.. 1.15 

Wheelbarrows 8.75 

Lawn Roller 14.50 

Eclipse Power Lawn Mower . 114.50 

Reo Power Lawn Mower 104.50 

52-gal. Elec. Water Heater .. 129.00 
Perfection Kero. Water Heater 39.00 

Portable Elec. Water Heater _ 1.95 

Dayton Water System ..___ 74.50 

Dempster Heavy Duty * 

Water System ..'. . . 99.50 

Jamesway Electric and Oil Brooders, 
Feeders, Founts and Heaters 

~2-it. Metal Hog Trough : . 2.15 

4-ft. Metal Hog Trough . 3.25 

Hog Waterers for barrel _.__'..._ 3.95 

30-gal. Range Boilers 16.50 

Cobey Manure Spreader 

on rubber 375.00 

Massey-Harris Horse Drawn 

Manure Spreader on steel .... 290.00 
8-f t. Judson Lime Spreader 

on rubber „• 185.00 

Little Giant Lime Spreader 

on steel 69.50 

Tobacco Setters- — Massey-Harris, 

Bemis, Tiger, New Holland 195.00 
12-16 Horse Drawn Disc 105.00 

12-ft. Metal Gate 22.50 

Wire Fence, Barb Wire, Poultry Fence, 

Poultry Netting. 
Vulcan Plows and Repairs 



for Service 



Largo or Small 



See Powers 



CONRAD HARDWARE 

ALL TYPES OF HOUSEHOLD 
APPUASCES 



PHONE 23 



WALTON. KENTUCKV 



FOR SALE— -Beautiful building lot, 
level, pavement laid, fenced, ap- 
proximately 70'x280', about 200 ft. 
from Dixie Highway, $1,000. J. T. 
Cooke, Crittenden, Ky. 2t-9» 



FOR SALE — Eleven ewes and 16 
lambs; 9 shoats, weigh about 70 
pounds each. Bruce Allen, Wal- 
ton-Nicholson Highway. lt-10* 

PLUMBING & HEATING— Repairs or 
new installations, furnace clean- 
ing and service on stokers, gas or 
oil furnaces. Tri -County Heating 
and Plumbing Co. Florence 593. 

tf-10 



F O 'R SALE — Automatic record 
changer, battery & electric radio. 
Box 174, Walton, Ky., Route 2. 
B. Witty. * 2M0* 



FOR SALE— New Jamesway electric 
floor brooder, 350-chick capacity. 
A. R. Kwozalia. Phone Florence 
593. 2t-10 

FOR SALE — 200 bushels of corn. 
Henry Brewster. Phone Walton 
783. 2t-9* 



Additional WANT ADS 

(Continued On Page 6) 



FOR SALE— 25 White Rock pullets, 
$1.75 each. Oscar Moore, Moffett 
Road, from Atwood. lt-10* 



BABY CHICKS— Ohio U. S. Approved 
—Pullorum Controlled. Chicks aire 
hatching every Sunday, Monday, 
and Thursday. Plenty of chicks on 
hand at all times. Open day and 
night. New Hampshires, White & 
Barred Rocks, $10.90 per 100; ail 
pullets, $13.90; cockerels, $11.50. 
S. C. White Leghorns, $11.90 per 
100; pullets, $24.50; cockerels, $3. 
Buff, White & Black, Minoxcas, 
Buff Leghorns, Austra Whites, 
$12.90 per 100; pullets, $26.00; 
cockerels, $6.00. S. C. Reds, Buff 
Rocks, Buff Orphingtons, White 
Wyandottes, Rock X Hamps, Hamp 
X Rocks, $11.90; pullets, $14.90; 
cockerels, $12.50. White & Black 
Giants, . Light Brahmas, $13.95. 
Heavy assorted, all heavies, $9.50. 
Plenty of started chicks. One week 
old," $13.90 per 100; two weeks old, 
$17.90; three weeks old, $22.90. 
White Pekin Ducklings, $30.00 per 
100. Order your turkey poults now, 
for delivery any time after March 
15, at $89.00 per 100. Turkeys and 
Ducks hatching on Sundays only. 
We carry a fulll line of poultry sup- 
plies, feeders and founts, poultry 
remedies and thermometers. Drive 
too this modern hatchery and see 
these exceptional bargains. > Visit- 
ors welcome. Phone Jackson 9354. 
Mt. Healthy Hatcheries, wmton & 
McKelvey Roads, Mt. Healthy, O 

lt-8 



FOR SALE— Six-room modern home, 
16 Edwards Ave., Walton. Apply 
H. R. Fisher. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE— Registered Angus male, 
Quisenberry breed. R. D. Hogan, 
Dry Ridge, Ky. Phone Williams - 
town 8231. 2t^9* 



FOR SALE— 40 or 50 bales alfalfa, 
second or third cutting, good sheep 
hay; also 60 bushels hand picked 
ear corn. G. H. Moore. Phone 
Walton 516. 2t-9* 



FOR SALE — Fresh cows, Jersey and 
Holstein, Guernseys with calves by 
side, also heavy springers, and 
stock cattle. James Coyle, Verona, 
Ky. . 2t-9* 

FOR SALE— Two horses, corning 4 
and 9, weigh 1400 each, good work- 
ers, 1 good single liner, ready to 
work. M. J. Worthington, Bracht- 

. Finer Road. 2t-9* 



FOR SALE — Piano, cheap; 2-unit 
Farm (Master electric milker; 6- 
can Farm Master cooler; team of 
horses, large, well broke, 11 years 
old. C. H. Hand, near Finer, Ky. 
Rhone Ind. 6197. Will tirade for 
young cattle or sheep. 2t-9* 





4> 




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iiirsi 


jpjj 




> 




■ 


• 



USED CBBS 



'46 Chevrolet Fleetline 

2-Door; clean. 

'49 Ford V-8 Custom 

very clean. 

'41 Plymouth 2-Door 
'37 Chevrolet Coupe 



'41 Chrysler 4-Door 
'41 Dodge 4-Door 
'37 Plymouth 2-Door 

TRUCKS— 

'48 Chev. 2-ton 161" 

'46 Chev. %-ton Stake 



Heavy Duty Wrecker Service 

Kenton Co. Motors 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. PHONE IND. 5004 



w 



Also Cooking, 
Water Heating 
and Refrigeration! 



PHONE 1372 

WALTON, KY. 



«;,, 



*«?S5ff* 



o« 



^fi/%* 



**»?^ 



WALT 




OVER 







— Northern Kentucky's Fastest Growing Weekly Newspaper — 
SERVING A PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY — BOONE, KENTON, GRANT AND GALLATIN COUNTIES 




Subscription $1.50 Per Year in Advance 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 1950 



Volume 35 — Number 1 1 



Organization Meeting 
For Historical Society 
Set For March 17 



On February 17, more than thirty 
residents of Boone County met at 
the Florence Town Hall to consider 
the formation of a Boone County 
Historical Society. The interest dis- 
played indicated a desire for such 
an organization, to preserve the dis- 
tory and folk-lore of the community. 
Mrs. J. P. Brothers of Limaburg, was 
awarded a copy of the life of Daniel 
Boone for telling the most interest- 
ing story of early life in the county. 

It was agreed to meet again on 
March IT, at the Florence Town Hall, 
at 8:00 p. m. for organization. A com- 
mittee composed of Mrs. E. G. Nes- 
tor, Mrs. J. P. Brothers, Mrs. Ann 
Connor and John Gault, was appoint- 
ed to nominate candidates for the 
offices of the society. The commit- 
tee, will report at the meeting Friday 
night, at which time officers will be 
elected. 

Lucian Bradford presided at the 
meeting and William Fitzgerald was 
secretary. 

Ryland Homemakers 

Twenty-four pieces of furniture 
were refinished by members of the 
Rylaml Homemakers Club, reported 
Mrs. Shelby Martin, leader, when 
the group met recently in the home 
of Mrs. Oliver Gee. Mrs. William 
Damon presided over the meeting. 

Mrs. William Dickman opened.her 
program with the Lord's prayer, re- 
peated in unison, followed by a 
biblical reading by Mrs. Gee.. An 
amusing poem, entitled "Do Some- 
thing," was given « by Mts. John 
Murchison. Songs were sung, in- 
cluding "Wild Irish Rose," favoring 
St Patrick's Day, this month. 

(Mrs. J. H. Frakes gave a lengthy 
book review on the novel, Mary," by 
Sholem Asoh. Mrs. W. H. Bagby, 
garfden leader, gave instructions in 
planting and transplanting flowers, 
also the proper treatment given po- 
tatoes before planting. 

Mrs. John Murchison, leader, gave 
the highlights of the lesson on "Dec- 
orative Stitches." A special work- 
shop day for that project will be held 
March 16 at the home of Mts. She! 
by Martin. 

Miss Zeima Byenly, home demon 
stration agent, gave interesting in 
formation on sewing secrets, also 
displayed a homemakers "All-In- 
One" .portable sewdng kit outfitted 
to be a real time saver. She also 
stated the District Federation meet- 
ing would be held May 3rd. 

The following members answered 
roll call by recalling their most em- 
barrassing mement, were Mesdames 
R. (B. Frakes, John Murchison, F. B. 
Hermes, R. L. Gibson, J. A. Rich, N. 
L. (Leach, W. H. Bagby, O. J. Will- 
iams, R. C. Fomash, William Damon, 
J. H. Frakes, William Dickman, 
Shelby Martin, Miss Zelma Byerly, 
and the hostess. 

• The April meeting will convene at 
the home of Mrs. O. J. Williams. 



"He Couldn't Marry Five," 

At New Haven, March 31 

The production, "He Couldn't Mar- 
ry Five," will be presented by the 
Junior class of New Haven High 
School in the school auditorium on 
Friday evening, March 31 at 8:00. 
The cast is working hard to make 
this as finished and polished as a 
professional stage performance. 

The cast includes Faye Judge, 
Joan Anderson, Delia Jones, Frances 
Conley, Sarah Cook, Norma Snow, 
Lizzie Rosenstiel, Babe Kenney, G. 
W. Baker and Scottie Friend. Mrs. 
Walton Smith is directing and doing 
a fine job. 

FISKBURG OES TO MEET 

Fiskburg Chapter, 334, Order of 
Eastern Star, will hold it's regular 
monthly meeting Saturday, March 
J8 at 8 p. m., in the Wilmington Ma- 
sonic hall, Fiskburg. There will be 
initiation for four candidates. 

Mrs. Zella Steeley, Worthy Matron, 
and Walter Rhoden, Worthy Patron, 
will preside. All O. E.-S. members 
are invited to attend. ' 

Mrs. Fisk Hostess to 
Nicholson-Atwood 
Homemakers Club 



Walton Literary Club 
Holds March Meet 
In Chambers Home 



The March meeting of the Walton from each of the other teams 



Piner Homemakers - 

Mrs. Owen Flynn entertained 
members of the Piner Homemakers 
Club in her home March 9th. 

The meeting was called to order 
by Mrs. William Walterman, presi- 
dent, and fourteen members answer- 
ed roll call with "A Book I Have Read 
This Year." 

Mrs. Dewey Fisk, reading chair- 
man, gave an excellent reading in 
connection with National Brother- 
hood Week. 

Miss Zelma Byerly, home demon- 
stration agent, gave a talk on